County: Farolito Sand Available For Holiday Season

first_imgCOUNTY News:The Los Alamos County Traffic and Streets Division has placed sand at the following locations to fill farolito bags:North Road at Lower Pueblo Canyon crossing;Deer Trap on Barranca Mesa;Soccer Field parking lot on North Mesa; andThe parking lot by the transfer station in White Rock.last_img

Continue reading

Slithery customer

first_img Obiter is intrigued as to why it was the snake and not the judge that was deemed to be worthy of rescue, however. Does this say something about the esteem in which the Indian judiciary is held? Obiter is grateful to professor Phil Thomas of Cardiff Law School for sending in a news snippet from the Hindu English language newspaper in India. A four-foot snake slithered into a judge’s chambers last month, and had to be ‘rescued’ by Fire and Rescue Service personnel, it relates. The snake was then safely handed over to Forest Department officials, the report said, and presumably released into the wild to live happily ever after. last_img read more

Continue reading

Dan-Czech moves passenger bridges

first_imgThe passenger boarding bridges were transported from the port by road. When loaded on the semi-trailers for the road transport, the cargo measured almost 4 m tall.www.dan-czech.czlast_img

Continue reading

Legal regulators must have lay chairs, LSB decides

first_imgThe Solicitors Regulation Authority and other legal regulators will have to appoint lay chairmen or women under plans announced by the Legal Services Board this morning.Announcing the response to a consultation opened last October, the super-regulator said that lay chairs are a likely route to improved outcomes and greater independence not only from the representative bodies, but also from the profession as the regulated community.The board said it has concluded that amending the governance to require lay chairs for regulatory bodies ‘provides a workable and proportionate route to increased independence in legal services. The LSB reached the view that greater independence will help safeguard the delivery of the regulatory objectives aligned to the principles of better regulation’. The Law Society and SRA both opposed the change. Current rules for the composition of regulatory boards were set by the LSB in 2009. The changes to the internal governance rules (IGRs) come into effect immediately and will apply to all new appointments.David Edmonds, the board’s chair, said: ‘Independent regulation is central to the aims of the 2007 Legal Services Act. This decision to require lay chairs for regulatory bodies represents a significant and sensible step towards embedding and strengthening independence in legal services regulation. It brings the regulatory bodies into line with the LSB’s own lay-chair requirements set out in the 2007 act. ‘I also believe that restructuring the appointments and reappointments process would be a proportionate further step to safeguard the independence of regulatory boards. We therefore set out, for further consultation, a series of detailed additional changes to the IGRs to strengthen the ability of the regulators to run their own appointments processes.’Charles Plant, chair of the SRA, is a solicitor and former litigation partner at a City firm. Lady Deech, chair of the Bar Standards Board, is an academic and non-practising barrister. The LSB stressed that its position on lay chairs ‘is in no sense a comment on the commitment to good regulation’ of the existing chairs – rather it is ‘an institutional issue’.The SRA said in a statement: ‘We understand the LSB decision on lay chairs. The SRA thought it was a finely balanced issue and we respect that, in exercising its statutory role, the LSB has reached this conclusion. The board will be discussing the implications in due course.’Vanessa Davies, director of the BSB, said: ‘Chairs of regulatory boards should be appointed on merit. The LSB’s decision is based on an assumption that lay chairs will behave independently in circumstances where legally qualified chairs would not, and we believe there is little evidence to support this conclusion.’A spokesperson for the Law Society said: ‘We are disappointed but not surprised with the LSB’s decision.  We strongly believe that regulators should be free to choose the best person for the job regardless of their background.’last_img read more

Continue reading

Olympic S-Bahn revived

first_imgBERLIN S-Bahn trains returned to the city’s famous Olympiastadion station on January 16, with the reinstatement of a further 4·8 km section of the network disused since 1980. The Westkreuz – Pichelsberg line serves the Charlottenburg quarter in the northwest of the city, with intermediate stations at Eichkamp, Heerstra§e and Olympiastadion.The line is served by routes S5 from Strausberg Nord and S75 from Wartenberg, which combine to provide a basic 10min interval service from the cross-city Stadtbahn to Pichelsberg. Both will be extended to Stresow and Spandau in December when a further 4·4 km is reopened. Renovation began in April 1996, and has cost a total of DM165m.As well as the 1936 Olympic stadium, the new route serves the Berlin trade fair, ice skating stadium and the Deutschlandhalle, which are linked by a new footway to Eichkamp station. Local bus routes have been restructured to feed into the S-Bahn services at Heerstra§e station.S-Bahn Berlin GmbH expects to reopen two further sections of the network later this year: S25 will be extended by 2·5 km from Lichterfelde Ost to Lichterfelde Süd in September, and the 8·5 km Tegel – Hennigsdorf line is due to reopen in December. Completion of the final 8·4 km section of the S-Bahn north ring between Jungfernheide and Schlast_img read more

Continue reading

‘We are making steady efforts to become a global leader’

first_imgINDUSTRY:?Last year’s rebranding of Hyundai Rotem is a key element in strengthening the company’s image in the international market. Chief Operating Officer of Total Rail Systems Lee Sang-Kil tells Chris Jackson that the company is looking to raise its export business to 70% of turnover.,The award of a contract to supply cars for the Almaty metro in Kazakhstan earlier this year marks Hyundai Rotem’s entry into the CIS market. This was followed by orders to supply double-deck coaches to Boston — the company’s third contract from a US commuter rail operator — and electrical equipment for metro Line 3 in Shenzhen. It all underlines Hyundai Rotem’s drive to become a global player, according to COO Lee Sang-Kil. Although the company in its current form only dates back to the July 1999 merger of the rolling stock business units of Hyundai, Daewoo and Hanjin to form Koros, Lee says the three firms brought many years’ experience in the domestic rail market. And since the Rotem name was adopted in January 2002, the company has become increasingly prominent on the international stage. As well as metro cars for Hong Kong, Delhi and Athens, the company supplied DMUs to Syria and Iran, breaking into the European market with a build of 120 inter-city DMUs now being delivered to Iarnród Éireann in Ireland. It is also supplying 12 two-car DMUs for TCDD in Turkey. At the end of last year the company was rebranded as Hyundai Rotem, which Lee says is ‘intended to establish an integrated image of “trustworthy” and “systematic” as a member of the Hyundai Motor Group, while maintaining Rotem’s speciality that has been nurtured over the past four decades’. Based on these values and experience, he says Hyundai Rotem will ‘contribute to the development of the domestic railway industry and make steady efforts to become a global leader’. With activities in the defence sector, plant and machinery as well as rail, Hyundai Rotem has around 3800 employees. Turnover in 2007 was US$19bn, of which 50% was generated by the rail sector. With global demand forecast to increase steadily over the next few years, Hyundai Rotem is investing more than US$50m to increase capacity at its Changwon plant by 2010. All production in Korea has been concentrated here since in 2006. At that time the plant had seven assembly lines: five for stainless steel carbodies, one for aluminum and one for mild steel shells. A second mild steel line and a sixth stainless-steel line were added in 2007, and a further aluminium body assembly line will be inaugurated this year, bringing total capacity to 850 vehicles/year. To accommodate the extra assembly lines, the plant is being expanded by 14%, from 106000 to 121000 m2. New buildings for testing, painting and warehousing are to be constructed by 2010, and two-shift working began in 2007 to accommodate the increase in production volume. Additional capacity is being added through the establishment of local subsidiaries and manufacturing plants to support recent contracts in the USA and Turkey. These work closely with the manufacturing plant in Changwon and the R&D centre in Uiwang. Lee says ‘we are using our US and Turkish subsidiaries as an advance base for our business extension, and in parallel we are extending outsourcing by co-operating with local construction, engineering and manufacturing companies’. He adds that Hyundai Rotem has a number of overseas offices, including Canada, India, Hong Kong, Greece and Ireland. Hyundai Rotem was one of the main local sponsors of the recent World Congress on Railway Research in Seoul, which Lee said offered a very important platform for the Korean railway industry. As well as giving the different companies ‘a foothold in the world market’, WCRR also enabled them to become aware of ‘bright technologies’ from other countries with a more advanced railway sector. Expanding the business Over the next two or three years, Lee expects Hyundai Rotem to ‘move into new markets, diversify our product range and expand our market share in target markets’. In 2007, he says, turnover in the domestic and international businesses was approximately equal, but ‘export is growing very rapidly’. He says the company’s longer-term target is to achieve a split of 70% export, 30% domestic. Lee believes that ‘opportunities in the domestic market are limited, as most city governments have already finished their major rail projects, although some are still planning light rail lines’. Increasingly, he says, metro and light rail projects are being structured as public-private partnerships, ‘but it takes a long time to negotiate the finance for these, and the rolling stock is not a big element in the whole package’. As a result, he explains, the company is ‘diversifying its product range to become a total rail systems supplier’, moving beyond its established base in the rolling stock sector. Hyundai Rotem has already started to gain prominence in the domestic E&M and signalling sectors. As consortium leader for Seoul metro Line 9, the company is ‘responsible for a range of construction activities including buildings, machinery and elevators, platform screen doors, signalling, telecommunications and trackwork, as well as the rolling stock’. Hyundai Rotem is also responsible for E&M work on the Busan – Gimhae automated light metro and the Sin Bundang line (RG 4.08 p231). Asked whether the company has identified specific targets for international expansion, Lee says ‘our major focus is on the metro market and high speed trains for the next few years. KTX-II deliveries are due to start next year — so we will have a proven high speed technology with which we can go into the export market’. He emphasises that KTX-II is not a derivative of the original KTX trains, which were essentially locally-built French TGV sets. ‘Korea carried out its own high speed train project as a government-led R&D project, and successfully developed the 350 km/h Hanvit 350 over 10 years. KTX-II is the commercial outcome of this work, based on our own know-how.’ Korail has now ordered 19 10-car KTX-II trainsets to operate the Seoul – Mokpo (Honam), Iksan – Yeosu (Jeolla) and Milyang – Masan (Gyeongjeon) lines, with six sets to be delivered in June 2009, four in June 2010 and nine in December 2010. In addition, Lee sees opportunities for Hyundai Rotem to export Korean high speed trains to Turkey and Brazil, ‘and maybe to the southeast Asian market — it would even be possible to consider Russia’. But he rules out China as a potential market, ‘because there are four big international players already established there, with local partners and subsidiaries which are already manufacturing their own models of high speed train.’ He also rules out expansion into the tram sector for similar reasons. ‘Siemens, Alstom and Bombardier already occupy the major portion of this market, and we think there is no profit in being a latecomer to the business’. Instead, ‘we are planning to increase our market share by developing high-value rolling stock like high speed trains, next-generation EMUs and maglev trainsets.’ Table I. Major rolling stock orders Year Customer Quantity Delivery LRVs and light metro cars 2000 Adana 36 2000 2005 Istanbul 34 2008 2005 Vancouver Canada Line 40 cars 2008-09 2006 Busan – Gimhae 50 2010 Metro cars 1998 Hong Kong MTR 104 cars 2001-02 2001 Delhi MRTC (Phase I) 240 cars 2002-07 2002 Incheon Airport line (AREX) 144 cars 2005-10 2002 Attiko Metro 126 cars 2003-04 2003 Salvador 24 cars 2008 2004 Hong Kong MTR 32 2006 2005 Seoul Line 9 96 cars 2008 2006 Seoul Line 2 354 cars 2007-09 2007 Seoul Line 3 358 cars 2009-10 2007 Sin Bundang Line 72 cars 2009-10 2007 Delhi MRTC (Phase 2) 192 cars 2009-10 2007 São Paulo Line 4 84 cars 2009 2008 Almaty metro 28 cars 2009-10 2008 Shenzhen Line 3 Electrical equipment for 144 cars 2009-10 Commuter rail 2001 Istanbul 92 EMU cars 2008-09 2005 Rio de Janeiro 80 EMU cars 2007 2006 Philadelphia (Septa) 120 EMU cars 2009-10 2006 Los Angeles (Scrra) 107 d/d cars 2009-10 2006 Miami (Sfrta) 14 d/d cars 2009-10 2007 Wellington 70 EMU cars 2010-11 2007 Tunis (Sncft) 76 EMU cars 2010 2008 Boston (MBTA) 75 d/d cars 2009-10 DMUs 2003 CFS (Syria) 50 cars 2006 2004 RAI (Iran) 150 cars 2007-09 2005 Iarnród Éireann 183 cars 2007-08 2005 TCDD (Turkey) 24 2008 High speed trains 2006 Korail (KTX-II) 10 x 10-car 2009-10 2007 Korail (KTX-II) 9 x 10-car 2009-10last_img read more

Continue reading

West Florida Men’s Basketball Announces 2009-10 Schedule

first_img PENSACOLA, Fla. – First year Head Coach Bob Stinnett of the University of West Florida men’s basketball team has announced the schedule for the 2009-2010 season, with the start of the regular season to take place on November 16 at home. The beginning of Gulf South Conference play will be January 7, also to take place in Pensacola. The men will travel to Mobile to play an exhibition match against Division I South Alabama November 5 before hosting their first regular season game against Columbus State at home on November 16. The Argonauts will then travel to the east coast November 20-21 to take on Puerto Rico-Bayamon in Melbourne, Fla. before facing Flagler just up the road in St. Augustine. The men will return home afterward to host the UWF Thanksgiving Classic, first playing Sunshine State Conference opponent Lynn on November 27 and former GSC rival Montevallo next on November 29. Following that, West Florida heads up to Valdosta State’s tournament December 4-5 to face Palm Beach Atlantic and Saint Leo before returning to Pensacola to play a single game against Delta State December 13. The Argonauts will then play two more games before the break, first at Columbus State on December 15 and back at home against Montevallo on December 19. West Florida then remains in Pensacola to host the UWF Christmas Classic December 29-30, where the men will face West Virginia Wesleyan and Virginia State in that order. The Argonauts then enter GSC play to start the New Year, beginning at home January 7 versus West Alabama and January 9 against Alabama-Huntsville. The men visit the Peach State next, playing matches against Valdosta State January 13 and West Georgia January 16. The Argos will return home to host North Alabama and Lambuth at the UWF Field House January 20 and 23, respectively. The last month of play sees the same GSC match-ups from January, where the team will travel to West Alabama February 3 and Alabama-Huntsville February 6 before playing at home against Valdosta State February 10 and West Georgia February 13. The men will then wrap up their regular season, travelling to North Alabama February 18 and Lambuth February 20 before finishing at home against Concordia-Selma February 23.The schedule is subject to change and can be viewed online at www.GoArgos.com. Print Friendly Version West Florida Men’s Basketball Announces 2009-10 Schedule Sharecenter_img Photo by John Blackie last_img read more

Continue reading

Fukabori in front at midway point

first_img GET THE BEST OF THE JAPAN TIMES KATO, Hyogo Pref. (Kyodo) Tour veteran Keiichiro Fukabori took sole possession of the lead with 4-under-par 68 at the midway point of the Mynavi ABC Championship on Friday.Fukabori picked up three shots on a bogey-free front nine at ABC Golf Club and added two more birdies against three bogeys before a superb eagle on the 18th gave him the lead on 9-under 135, boosting his hopes of a ninth career title. Fukabori, who last won on the Japanese tour at the 2005 ANA Open, moved three shots clear of Mamoru Osanai, who also had an eagle en route to a 68 and second place. center_img IN FIVE EASY PIECES WITH TAKE 5last_img read more

Continue reading

Coco Gauff Gets Wild Card For the 2019 US Open

first_img15 year old tennis sensation Coco Gauff has been awarded a wildcard for the women’s singles at the US Open this month.The American teenager became the youngest player in the Open era to qualify for the main draw at Wimbledon, beating former world number one Venus Williams en route to the fourth round.The 2011 champion Sam Stosur will join Gauff in the main draw at the US Open after also accepting a wildcard.The tournament serves off at Flushing Meadows in New York on 26 August.RelatedUS Open: USTA Set to Overlook Age Eligibility for 15-Year-Old Wimbledon Sensation Coco GauffJuly 21, 2019In “Tennis”Coco Gauff Beats Jelena Ostapenko To Win Maiden WTA TitleOctober 13, 2019In “Tennis”Australian Open: Djokovic, Nadal, Williams Get Tricky DrawsJanuary 16, 2020In “Tennis”last_img read more

Continue reading

JAVA addresses preparation concerns for young players

first_imgJackie Cowan, general secretary of the Jamaica Volleyball Association (JaVA), admitted that the preparation for both the male under-19 and female under-18 teams, which are currently competing in the Caribbean Zonal Volleyball Association (CAZOVA) Youth Volleyball Tournament at the G.C. Foster College, was not what they would have wanted due to a number of challenges. Coaches Steve Davis for the boys and female coach Shedieky Hamilton-Barnes expressed concerns over the lack of preparation heading into the six-day tournament after both teams lost their opening games on Monday.Since then, the boys, who are the defending champions from 2015, have bounced back with a 3-1 sets win over the US Virgin Islands. “The team at that time (2015) was a bit more experienced than the team that we have now. What hindered the progress in terms of preparation is that the boys were from all over the country, and training would take place during school time. Many of them wouldn’t get to come into Spanish Town at G.C. Foster College. So we only had weekends when we could get the boys together. It wasn’t until schools went on holidays that we got them into a proper camp,” Cowan said. “In terms of the age group, although it’s an under-19 and under-18 tournament, the players have to be three years younger. It was very difficult to find players. Even though we had trials, the girls that came out, in terms of technical ability, were not at the point where we could build on what they have for competition. Although we have an active primary school league, the level is not yet where we want it to be,” she added. Despite the lack of experience, Cowan believes that the boys still stand a good chance of defending their title and that the girls’ youth programme can continue to develop from this opportunity. “We always have a chance. We won the game on Tuesday against USVI, so, hopefully, we can get into the top two spots to get a favourable semi-final. Once we get there, we always have a chance at the finals, and from there, we have a chance of retaining the title,” Cowan said. “The expectations were not overly high for the girls for obvious reasons, but at the end of the day, we came in with the intention to compete, so if we can get into the semi-finals, that will be great as this tournament was really to see where we are and to develop our youth programme because we really haven’t done that on the girls’ side. So, hopefully, we can keep the girls together and have them transition into the other age groups in the future,” she added.last_img read more

Continue reading