Tornadoes seek victory no. 5

first_imgMOST READ Foton Pilipinas’ Cherry Rondina. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netFoton tries to stay unbeaten in the Philippine Superliga Grand Prix today, hoping to again use a slight change in player positions that coach Moro Branislav experimented with a game ago.Foton will face Cignal at 3 p.m. at Filoil Flying V Centre, with Branislav taking a huge risk by making his players man different positions.ADVERTISEMENT PH among economies most vulnerable to virus POC told: explain use of gov’t money We are young Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. “I prepared a little change to see what it will do to my team’s future,” said Branislav, whose team paces the league at 4-0.He hinted at new positions for open spikers Cherry Rondina and EJ Laure and even for come backing middle spiker Dindin Manabat.Foton will miss ace middle blocker Jaja Santiago, who will join her National U teammates in Japan for the next 10 days.—Marc Anthony ReyesFEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSCone plans to speak with Slaughter, agent Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH EDITORS’ PICK Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine Mainland China virus cases exceed 40,000; deaths rise to 908 As fate of VFA hangs, PH and US forces take to the skies for exercise Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town 30 Filipinos from Wuhan quarantined in Capas Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND Shanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modes Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next View commentslast_img read more

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LA 2024 Olympics bid team tries to soothe nerves over Trump

first_imgDon’t miss out on the latest news and information. Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH Bernard Lapasset said a Paris 2024 Olympics would “see sport as a driver of positive change”.Los Angeles and Paris are seen as the favorites to host the 2024 games.Los Angeles has the games twice before, in 1932 and 1984.Paris hosted the Olympics 100 years before, in 1924.Budapest has never previously hosted.The International Olympic Committee will make its final decision next September.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next We are young FILE – In this Aug. 20, 2016, file photo, United States’ Allyson Felix celebrates after winning the gold medal in the women’s 4×400-meter relay final during the athletics competitions of the 2016 Summer Olympics at the Olympic stadium in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. With 10 months before the vote in the race for the 2024 Summer Games, bid leaders from Los Angeles, Paris and Budapest, Hungary, have traveled to Doha, Monday Nov. 14, 2016, to pitch their case to the general assembly of the Association of National Olympic Committees. The Los Angeles bid team selected sprint star Allyson Felix, a Los Angeles-born African-American athlete who has won six Olympic gold medals and three silvers _ as one of its key speakers for the presentation. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum, File)Six-time Olympic champion Allyson Felix led the Los Angeles 2024 bid delegation in seeking to calm the fears of the “Olympic family” following the election of Donald Trump as president.The American city, alongside rivals Paris and Budapest, unveiled for the first time details of their bids to host the Summer Olympics in eight years’ time to the Association of National Olympic Committees’ General Assembly being held in Qatar.ADVERTISEMENT Mayweather abhors being compared to Conor McGregor EDITORS’ PICK 30 Filipinos from Wuhan quarantined in Capas Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND And although Felix nor LA mayor Eric Garcetti mentioned the president-elect by name, they addressed concerns delegates might have about a US Olympics bid following comments made by Trump during the presidential election.Felix told delegates that America needed the Olympics “now more than ever”.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSCone plans to speak with Slaughter, agent“We have just finished our presidential election and some of you may question America’s commitment to its founding principals,” said Felix.“I have one message to you — please don’t doubt us.” PH among economies most vulnerable to virus “An America that remains actively engaged in the world.“An America that is outward looking, ready to play its role alongside the competing nations to address our world’s most pressing challenges.”Each city gave a 30-minute presentation on their 2024 bid to some 1,000 delegates gathered in Doha.LA went first and was followed by outsider Budapest, which claimed it only needed to build three more arenas to be ready for the games.The chairman of Budapest’s bid, Balazs Furjes, played on the relative small size of the Hungarian capital, claiming a “mid-size global city” should be awarded the Olympics.“We offer something totally different, it’s the right city at the right time,” he said. “A real alternative.Deputy-mayor Alexandra Szalay-Bobrovniczky emphasized the cultural strengths of Budapest’s bid but afterwards refused to be drawn on the issue of Trump, saying that the Hungarians remained confident after their presentation.Sharing the loveLast up was Paris, which included contributions from Tony Estanguet, a three-time Olympic canoe slalom champion and Paris mayor Anne Hidalgo.She emphasized the cultural aspects of the French bid and said: “At Paris 2024, we will swim in the River Seine, we will travel in driver-less vehicles.“We will open our doors and hearts to the world, to share our love of life and love of others. I know, each of you has a unique history with Paris.” Shanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modes As fate of VFA hangs, PH and US forces take to the skies for exercise Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports Mainland China virus cases exceed 40,000; deaths rise to 908 Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine In a stirring address Felix, who was born in Los Angeles, also emphasized America’s “diversity” and also mentioned that her ancestors were transported to America against their will.There has been speculation that Trump’s election victory could harm Los Angeles’ chances.His remarks on policy issues during the campaign, especially regarding a potential ban on Muslims going to America and calling illegal Mexican immigrants rapists, are seen by some as being potentially harmful to LA’s bid outside the US.Felix, who won two relay sprint golds in Rio this year, was followed on stage by Garcetti.“My vision of America is a country that is informed by the Olympic vision,” he said.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town View commentslast_img read more

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Papuan chef Charles Toto serves up sustainability and environmental protection in a platter

first_imgActivism, Conservation, Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Activism, Food, Forest People, Forest Products, Forests, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Indigenous Communities, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Rainforest Conservation, Rainforest People, Rainforests, Saving Rainforests, Sustainability, Traditional People, Tropical Deforestation Charles Toto is the founder of the Jungle Chef Community, a network of enthusiasts from across the Indonesian region of Papua who promote sustainable living and environmental protection through local cuisine.Toto came up with the idea after seeing foreign documentary makers and tour groups embarking on weeks-long treks in the Papuan wilderness with nothing more than instant and canned food.Over the years, he has learned to make the best use of the ingredients served up by the forest and the sea, and has taken his unique mission to culinary shows across Indonesia and abroad.But for Toto and his group, the opening up of Papua’s forests to palm oil and other commercial operators, aided by a government-backed infrastructure push, threatens the region’s natural wealth and heritage. Charles Toto’s epiphany came during his time working in the kitchen at a hotel in his home region of Papua in eastern Indonesia.The hotel catered to foreign visitors, many of whom flew in to shoot documentary films, sometimes for several weeks at a time, in the lush jungles of Papua, home to some of the last unspoiled wilderness areas in the country.“When I saw them bringing in so much luggage, I wondered to myself what they would eat in the forest,” Toto told Mongabay Indonesia.He had friends among the guides who accompanied the groups, and they filled him in: instant food and canned sardines, for the most part.Toto was 16 when he enrolled in a culinary program at a vocational school in Jayapura, the Papua provincial capital. At that point it wasn’t his life’s dream; he’d had his heart set on becoming a lawyer. But after missing out on a place in a regular high school, which would have set him on his way to a career in law, he figured he would sign up for vocational school.After the three-year course, he wound up in an entry-level job washing dishes at the hotel in Jayapura. And that’s when the tourists came into his life, ushering in the epiphany: Why not, he thought, cater to these tour groups by providing them with fresh, wholesome meals during their trips?The idea went over well, and Toto embarked with his first tour group in 1997, a year after leaving vocational school. That inaugural trip lasted some six weeks, with the group trekking through the densely forested Baliem Valley in the Papuan highlands, then heading west to the now-famed coastal paradise of Raja Ampat.“A hotel chef would think to bring his own meat because it’s more hygienic,” Toto says. “But I think food from the forest is more hygienic, it’s cleaner and organic.”Charles Toto serves up sustainability and environmental protection in a platter. Image by Luh De Suriyani/Mongabay-Indonesia.He learned from the locals about the meals that could be conjured up using the resources found nearby, and bartered ingredients with them. It was, in effect, a return to his roots as a native Papuan, and an embrace of the principle that has served him to this day: “The forest is a market for Papuans to shop in without having to spend money.”Toto thrived in his culinary niche, constantly learning something new amid the rigors of trekking and sailing through largely unexplored places. Disaster was no obstacle, either. “We got stranded on an island once for three or four days. We had to make do with whatever [food] was there,” he says.As his business thrived and his renown spread, Toto built up a network of like-minded chefs. In 2008, he founded the Jungle Chef Community, which brings together dozens of local chefs from across Papua who specialize in rustling up meals from ingredients they find in the forests. Toto and his community have appeared at culinary events across Indonesia and around the world, promoting their unique mission.“We train our members how to identify local cooking ingredients and how to make traditional Papuan food,” Toto says.Foraging and hunting locally is widely accepted as a sustainable use of natural resources, and cuts the cost and carbon footprint from shipping in food from farther away. In the case of the Jungle Chef Community, it also helps sustain interest in ancient practices, values and culture that are at risk of slowly dying out as younger generations of Papuans embrace a more modern lifestyle.“The key is to be able to obtain and [creatively] use what nature provides you with at that time and in that place,” Toto says.The Jungle Chef Community also runs a program that teaches cooking traditional food to children, along with other practices to protect the environment, such as waste management and planting mangroves.Charles Toto gives a presentation at an international food festival in Bali. Image courtesy of Ubud Food Festival.But the most intense pressure on the group’s mission comes from the government’s sweeping infrastructure development plan that activists say threatens the pristine forests and rich biodiversity of Papua.“A lot of sago farms are being sold off as [infrastructure] is developed in Papua,” Toto says. Sago has for generations been a staple food for the lowland peoples in the island of New Guinea and the Malukus, but local dietary preferences are increasingly shifting to rice, a more land- and water-intensive crop that is also eating up Papua’s sago farmlands.Another threat to the region’s forests is the arrival of the palm oil industry, in search of new lands after the wholesale deforestation of much of Sumatra and Borneo, and incentivized by the infrastructure expansion. Large swaths of forest-clearing are already being reported in Papua, along with a high number of hotspots — the calling card of an industry notorious for slash-and-burn clearing.Nearly 200 square kilometers (77 square miles) of forest have been cleared in Papua’s Merauke district since 2014 for a single plantation, according to the Washington-based World Resources Institute (WRI), with 10 square kilometers (3.9 square miles) being opened up just since October last year.The challenges are mounting, but if anything they’ve encouraged Toto to come up with even more ways to introduce local Papuan cuisine boasting fresh ingredients from its forests.“Papua is indeed rich in natural resources from its forests,” he says, “and the Jungle Chef Community introduces it through cooking.”Banner image: A river valley in a mountain range in West Papua province, Indonesia.This story was reported by Mongabay’s Indonesia team and was first published on our Indonesian site on May 25, 2017.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Basten Gokkoncenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Palm oil certification? No silver bullet, but essential for sustainability (commentary)

first_imgArticle published by Mike Gaworecki Animals, Climate Change, Commentary, Conservation, Deforestation, Editorials, Environment, Forests, Orangutans, Palm Oil, Palm Oil And Biodiversity, Researcher Perspective Series, Rspo, Wildlife Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img We need a global standard on what constitutes sustainable palm oil and a common system to implement it. Arriving at this consensus requires a convening body to connect every link in the palm oil supply chain, across different countries and jurisdictions.A recent report from Changing Markets Foundation, released with additional comments by NGOs such as FERN, the Environmental Investigation Agency, Mighty Earth, and Friends of the Earth Netherlands, criticizes the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil and proposes that certification standards are — as stated by the same NGOs — ‘holding back the progressive reform of the sector’ and may even be causing ‘active damage.’This report disregards some of the important realities in the industry and on the ground, and fails to offer practical solutions. Simply bashing certification because of its imperfections puts the advances made at risk, instead of helping develop standards and synergies that facilitate compliance across the global palm oil supply chain.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. As one of the world’s most widely traded food and beverage commodities, palm oil is used in everything from baked goods to biofuels. It is produced in Southeast Asia, Africa, and Latin America and sold to customers around the globe. Because no single jurisdiction governs this trade, it is extremely difficult to drive the broad-scale reform needed to counteract the negative impacts of the palm oil industry on forests, climate, biodiversity, and people living in the areas where this crop is produced.So how do we make sustainable palm oil a reality?Foremost, we need a global standard on what constitutes sustainable palm oil and a common system to implement it. Arriving at this consensus requires a convening body to connect every link in the palm oil supply chain, across different countries and jurisdictions. The Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) has worked consistently for the past 14 years to drive this type of industry-wide agreement and change through its voluntary platform.However, a recent report from Changing Markets Foundation, released with additional comments by NGOs such as FERN, the Environmental Investigation Agency, Mighty Earth, and Friends of the Earth Netherlands, criticizes the RSPO and proposes that certification standards are — as stated by the same NGOs — ‘holding back the progressive reform of the sector’ and may even be causing ‘active damage.’This report disregards some of the important realities in the industry and on the ground, and fails to offer practical solutions. Simply bashing certification because of its imperfections puts the advances made at risk, instead of helping develop standards and synergies that facilitate compliance across the global palm oil supply chain.Certification is not perfect, but RSPO has continuously welcomed feedback from NGOs and stakeholders in an effort to strengthen requirements and advance capacity for implementation and verification.Meanwhile, the solutions promoted by RSPO have already brought many tangible impacts. An RSPO/World Resources Institute collaboration has increased transparency through use of tools like GeoRSPO and Global Forest Watch that pinpoint deforestation and fires linked to palm oil. This collaboration has helped RSPO better monitor what is happening in and around its members’ plantations and concessions (like spotting potential forest fires) and assisted RSPO member companies in engaging with their suppliers to solve underlying problems.The 2017 RSPO Impacts Report showed a total of 189,777 hectares of ‘high conservation value’ landscapes (areas that are critical ecosystems for biodiversity and cultural values or have effects on larger landscapes) have been preserved from palm oil expansion and are currently being managed by RSPO members — a 21 percent increase from the previous year. Independent studies have also shown the impact certification has in protecting orangutan habitats and limiting deforestation, in some cases by a factor of 25 times compared to non-certified areas.No silver bullet can tackle the global sustainability challenges of palm oil production. We need all the tools and support we can get. Despite its imperfections, the RSPO global platform and certification system — working across jurisdictions with 3,787 members from over 90 countries — serves as a starting point to unite the palm oil industry in its efforts to tackle this formidable task.It is the shared responsibility of all those involved to improve certification systems, to drive uptake of sustainable products, and to bring into the fold the many actors who still operate without any commitments to sustainability. Only through broader, constructive collaboration can sustainable palm oil succeed.Bornean orangutan. Photo by Rhett Butler.Anne Rosenbarger is a RSPO Board of Governors Environmental NGO Member and Southeast Asia Commodities Manager for the World Resources Institute.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

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Latam Eco Review: Resistance, hope and camera traps

first_imgAnimals, Birds, Camera Trapping, Conservation, Deforestation, Endangered Species, Environment, Fish, Fishing, Forests, Mining, Oceans, Sharks, Turtles, Wildlife Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Maria Salazarcenter_img The recent top stories from Mongabay Latam, our Spanish-language service, include a call to cover climate change, the dangers of opposing Colombia’s largest hydropower plant, and the most inspiring conservation news of 2018.‘We are not doing enough’: 25 media groups commit to cover climate change“Journalists across the continent have a profound obligation to understand the science behind the entire planet’s transition to a different model of growth and development,” says a statement signed by 25 media organizations, including Colombia’s influential El Espectador and Bolivia’s El Deber newspapers, Argentine environmental magazine Claves 21, Peru’s Ojo-Publico.com, and Mexico’s Lado B. The editorial was published by each group, including Mongabay Latam.Image that accompanied the statement on Instagram.Camera traps: The most talked-about videos of 2018Andean bears, jaguars, pumas, brocket deer and mountain tapirs were among the species captured on camera traps across Latin America last year. This important tool allows researchers to observe behavior without disturbing animals in remote zones and to learn more about their habits for conservation efforts. Last year Mongabay Latam shared videos from the forests of Colombia, Peru and Ecuador, among others.On an expedition to the Amazonas region, photographer Michael Tweddle captured this image of a golden Andean bear for the first time. Image by Michael Tweddle.Top 10 most popular conservation interviewsA researcher who lived alone on an island for two years to study penguins; the park ranger who’s worked in Peru’s Manú National Park for 33 years; and the photographer who traveled for 83 days in the most remote site in Chile’s Katalalixar reserve were among the most popular interview subjects by Mongabay Latam last year. Teddy Cairuna Cauper, a Shipibo indigenous leader in Peru who is an expert in drones; Luis Añez, the former manager of the Zulia Metropolitan Zoo in Venezuela; and Walter Bustos, the former director of Galapagos National Park were also featured.Carlos Gaymer was instrumental in the creation of four marine reserves in Chile. Image by Esmoi.The year of living dangerously: Colombia’s Hidroituango murdersThe murder last year of two activists who opposed Hidroituango, Colombia’s largest hydropower project, illustrates the threats that environmental defenders continued to face in the country last year. In 2017, an environmental activist was murdered every two days in Colombia. By February last year, the death toll had surpassed 29 victims.Hidroituango will be the largest hydropower project in Colombia. Image by EPM.Top 8 most inspiring conservation storiesA biocultural map created by Waorani communities in Ecuador in defense against oil drilling was the most inspiring conservation story picked by Mongabay Latam’s editorial team for 2018. Other stories included female rangers who protect sea turtle eggs on Nicaragua’s Pacific coast; and a Peruvian reserve that has helped bring vicuñas back from the brink of extinction.Turtles nesting in La Flor-San Juan del Sur Wildlife Refuge in Nicaragua. Image by Paso Pacifico.Top 8 ocean storiesAn investigation into an iron ore company accused of polluting Chile’s ocean; an interview with the researcher who first found 337 beached whales in Tierra del Fuego; and the revelation that one in three Peruvians unknowingly eat shark were chosen by the Mongabay Latam team for their popularity and news value.The seas off Peru are home to 66 shark species; at least 32 are caught by small-scale fishers. Image courtesy of Oceana.Read these stories in Spanish via Mongabay Latam here.Banner image of capybaras in Colombia by Rhett Butler for Mongabay.last_img read more

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Brazil sees growing wave of anti-indigenous threats, reserve invasions

first_imgAt least 14 indigenous reserves have been invaded or threatened with invasion, according to Repórter Brasil, an online news service and Mongabay media partner. Threats and acts of violence against indigenous communities appear to have escalated significantly since President Jair Bolsonaro assumed office.Indigenous leaders say Bolsonaro’s incendiary language against indigenous people has helped incite that violence, though the government denies this, with one official saying the administration will “stop the illegality.” Indigenous leaders point out that, so far, the government has failed to provide significant law enforcement assistance in the crisisAmong recent threats and attacks: a top indigenous leader, Rosivaldo Ferreira da Silva of the Tupinambá people, claims to have detected a plot by large-scale landowners and military and civilian police to murder him and his family. The Uru-Eu-Wau-Wau and Karipuna reserves in Rondônia state have been invaded by land grabbers and illegal loggers.Another five indigenous territories near the city of Altamira in Pará state have also reportedly been invaded. Illegal deforestation in the Awá Indigenous Reserve in Maranhâo state. Forests are illegally cleared by outsiders in preparation for cattle or crops. Image courtesy of Mário Vilela / FUNAI.In early February, one of Brazil’s main indigenous leaders, Rosivaldo Ferreira da Silva, known as Cacique (chief) Babau, held an emergency meeting with government officials and human rights organizations to denounce a plot to kill him and his family.He called on authorities for urgent action to investigate the plot and provide protection. He then flew to Brasilia where he was received by the head of the Brazilian Federal Prosecution Office (Procuradoria-Geral da República, PGR), the independent federal litigators.Babau is one of the leaders of the 4,600 member Tupinambá indigenous group who live on the 47,000-hectare (116,000-acre) Tupinambá de Olivença Indigenous Reserve in southern Bahia state, within the Caatinga and Atlantic Forest biomes, which has seen soaring deforestation due to agribusiness expansion. Ten years go FUNAI, the government’s indigenous agency, declared the area a reserve but the land has yet to be fully demarcated because of long delays by the Justice Ministry in publishing the final approval document.The reserve’s creation has been a source of ongoing conflict, with local landowners and hotel owners challenging the indigenous group’s right to occupy the territory – especially now that the land has greatly increased in value as large-scale agricultural producers seek more places to grow export crops.Babau said he had “robust evidence” of a recent meeting in the town of Itabuna between big landowners and military and civilian policemen to discuss a plot to kill him. One of the plans, he said, was to stop him and his family on a highway, plant drugs and arms in his car, then murder all passengers, including his two young nieces, claiming that Babau had returned fire.Rosivaldo Ferreira da Silva, Cacique (chief) Babau, the best-known leader of the 4,600 member Tupinambá indigenous group who live on the 47,000-hectare (116,000-acre) Tupinambá de Olivença Indigenous Reserve in southern Bahia state. Image courtesy of Wikipedia.Babau told the Folha de S. Paulo newspaper that the objective of the small group of plotters was “to get their hands on the Tapinambé territory.”  He was troubled above all about the plan to besmirch the Indians’ public image: “We are Tapinambé, and we aren’t afraid of death,” he said. “What revolts us is the plan to blacken our name. We live peacefully all our life and then, when we die, they claim we are drug traffickers! That is to kill someone twice!”So far, the Bahia government’s Justice Secretariat, to which Babau directed his complaint, has refused to comment on the case. The PGR issued a press statement saying that it would “accompany the work of the authorities to guarantee the safety of Babau and his family.”A group of 25 anthropologists and researchers who have worked with the Tapinambé issued a statement on 13 February in which they called on authorities “to carry out an urgent investigation into the threats and assassination plans made against the Tupinambá people,” “to take immediate and effective measures to protect the Tupinambá, particularly Cacique Babau,” and for the government to complete the demarcation process, hopefully ending the years of conflict.However, demarcation may not be likely: President Bolsonaro has long made it known that he vehemently opposes further demarcation of indigenous lands. And the government has specifically mentioned this reserve as one of the ones it wishes to reexamine to see if the indigenous claim is valid.IBAMA, Brazil’s environmental regulatory agency, and Federal Police investigate illegal logging in the Arara Indigenous Reserve in Pará state. IBAMA, which saw its budget slashed by half under President Temer, is increasingly unable to respond to indigenous reserve invasions. Image courtesy of IBAMA.A wave of indigenous conflictsThe threat against the Tupinambá and its leader is no isolated case. Since the beginning of the year, anti-indigenous actions have been reported across Brazil. In a recent article Repórter Brasil, an online non-profit news service and Mongabay media partner, reported that at least 14 indigenous reserves have been invaded or threatened with invasion.Since the start of 2019, land grabbers have been particularly brazen in their actions against two Amazon indigenous groups in Rondônia state, the Uru-Eu-Wau-Wau, which experienced a major invasion by illegal loggers on 12 January, and the Karipuna.On 20 January, two Karipuna men from Panorama village were making their way through the forest for a meeting with medics from the Special Secretariat of Indigenous Health (Secretaria Especial de Saúde Indígena, SESAI), when they discovered 20 invaders on indigenous land.The illegal deforestors ignored the indigenous demand that they move out. “The invaders have built roads and felled a lot of forest!” an indigenous leader told NGO Greenpeace. “They are saying they will invade our village, burn our houses, kill our hens, kill our three main leaders.… Doesn’t FUNAI [Brazil’s indigenous agency] see what they are doing to our people? I don’t understand!”After a major invasion by land grabbers on January 12, 2019, the Uru-eu-wau-wau people organized regular patrols. They are determined to defend their ancestral territory. Image by Divulgação Kanindé.However, it appears that FUNAI under Bolsonaro may no longer be in a position to respond forcefully. The new government removed it from the powerful Justice Ministry and divided it in two, handing over responsibility for indigenous demarcation to the Ministry of Agriculture, well known for its favoritism toward agribusiness and hostility toward indigenous land rights. The everyday tasks of running FUNAI are now housed with the new Ministry for Women, the Family and Human Rights, a catch-all ministry widely expected to be underfunded and weak. “We don’t know how we will do our work without direct contact with the Federal Police [which remain part of the Justice Ministry],” said one FUNAI employee speaking anonymously.Despite these changes, the administration is still obliged to implement the law. The Rondônia branch of the Federal Public Ministry (Ministério Público Federal, MPF), a group of independent litigators, has repeatedly called on the Bolsonaro administration to act and remove invaders from the Uru-Eu-Wau-Wau and Karipuna reserves. It has warned that “the situation is getting worse and worse, becoming unsustainable,” with the risk of “bloody conflicts,”The Karipuna are particularly vulnerable due to successive waves of occupation. The first blow came early in the 20th century when Percival Farquhar, a wealthy entrepreneur from Pennsylvania, U.S., accepted the challenge of building the Madeira-Mamoré railway, linking Brazil and Bolivia for the export of Amazon rubber.Beating immense logistical problems, Farquhar completed the railway. But the human cost was horrific: it is estimated that 6,000 of 20,000 construction workers died, mainly from malaria and yellow fever. The Karipuna, who had attacked the railway workers, were brutally repressed and forced to work for the rubber barons.Throughout the 20th century, the Karipuna continued to suffer and die, particularly from introduced diseases, with their population falling to just four in the 1970s. Then those numbers began to rebound. In the early 1980s, a work group marked out an ancestral territory, and in 1998 a Karipuna reserve was officially inaugurated. Today there are 58 known Karipuna. However, more may live, uncontacted, with small bands sighted on occasion fleeing deeper into the forest.Today, the Karipuna are too few and too weak to organize effective resistance against determined land grabbers. They also believe the current wave of attacks may be especially malicious and motivated by the anger felt by outsiders when Karipuna leader Adriano Karipuna travelled to New York in April 2018 to publicly denounce the threats faced by his people at the U.N. Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues.The Karipuna, like the Uru-Eu-Wau-Wau, have made urgent requests to federal and state authorities for law enforcement protection. They say that, so far, the government hasn’t acted with any significant measures. The MPF fears that the current land grabber offensive may complete the process underway for over a century – the final annihilation of the Karipuna. It is warning of “imminent genocide.”Other violent assaults on indigenous rights are being reported across Brazil. The Pankararu,an indigenous group in the Northeast Brazilian state of Pernambuco has long suffered conflict. But on 28 October, the same day as Bolsonaro’s electoral win, violence against them was ratchetted up when a group of outsiders set fire to the Pankararu’s health clinic.Outsiders are also threatening the Tembés and Timbiras indigenous groups in the Alto Rio Guamá Indigenous Reserve in the Amazonian state of Pará. One of their leaders, who wishes to remain anonymous, said that the Indians have received threatening letters saying that “the time of Lula [the former leftist Workers’ Party president] is over and [rightist] Bolsonaro’s hour has come.” Another five indigenous territories near the city of Altamira in Pará state have also reportedly been invaded.The Karipuna have been denouncing illegal occupation of their land since 2017, but their numbers are so low they find it difficult to resist invaders. Image courtesy of Greenpeace.Indigenous groups making a standSome indigenous groups are fighting back against what some leaders are calling a “free for all.” The Guajajara, a large indigenous group in the Northeast state of Maranhão, have set up “Guardians of the Forest” patrols, now involving as many as 120 Indians. They confront and evict loggers. “I don’t know how many times we’ve kicked loggers off our land,” said Tainaky, one of the Guardians.However, many indigenous people fear that, without decisive action by authorities, the rule of law will deteriorate. “The invasions will intensify,” predicted Adriano Karipuna. “Bolsonaro proclaims that Indians don’t need land and are lazy, that they are like animals in a zoo. And now the man who said these wicked things is in power.”Esequiel Roque do Espírito Santo, Undersecretary for Policies of Promotion of Racial Equity in the new Ministry of Family, Women and Human Rights, denies any holding back of law enforcement by the Bolsonaro administration. On a February visit to the Uru-eu-wau-wau Indigenous Reserve to assess the January invasion, he said, “We want to send a message that the State is close, that we were there to stop the illegality.” However, the Uru-eu-wau-wau Reserve has yet to see a major assist from law enforcement.The anthropologist, Daniela Alarcon, one of the signatories of the Tupinambé letter of support, worries that past Bolsonaro incendiary statements could incite violence. She told Mongabay: “The repeated anti-indigenous statements that Bolsonaro has made operate like a greenlight to those working against the Indians to take the law in their own hands. They believe they will be supported and legitimized by the government if they do so.”Cleber Buzatto, executive secretary of the Catholic Church’s Indigenous Missionary Council (Conselho Indígenista Missionário, CIMI), believes there has been a dangerous shift in policy under the new president: “We are witnessing a new phase in the illegal and criminal takeover of indigenous land by economic groups. The land grabbers are encouraged and protected by the indigenous policies of the Bolsonaro government. The rhetoric against the constitutional rights of the Indians heard during the campaign is now reflected in administrative acts.”Indeed, the president did make extravagant promises to industrial agribusiness and to the ruralistas, the nation’s rural elite, during his electoral campaign; and they responded in kind by becoming his close political ally. If recent events are any indicator, and if rural violence and exploitation escalate, Brazil’s indigenous groups and the Amazon rainforest, could potentially pay a high price to satisfy Bolsonaro’s political base.Correction: This story originally shortened the name of the Tupinambá de Olivença Indigenous Reserve, calling it the Tupinambá Indigenous Reserve. The error has been corrected.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Tupinambá young people perform a ritual dance. There are roughly 900,000 indigenous people in Brazil today. Many are adamant about maintaining their ancestral territories and cultural traditions. That view runs counter to that of many large rural landowners who would like to see indigenous reserves broken up for private ownership and indigenous people absorbed into the general society. Image courtesy of Racismo Ambiental. Article published by Glenn Scherer Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Agriculture, Amazon Agriculture, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Amazon Logging, Amazon People, Conflict, Controversial, Corruption, Culture, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Crime, Environmental Law, Environmental Politics, Ethnocide, Forest Fragmentation, Forests, Governance, Government, Green, Human Rights, Illegal Logging, Indigenous Cultures, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Reserves, Indigenous Rights, Industrial Agriculture, Land Conflict, Land Grabbing, Land Rights, Land Speculation, Land Use Change, Law, Law Enforcement, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest Logging, Rainforests, Regulations, Saving The Amazon, Social Justice, Threats To The Amazon, timber trade, Traditional People, Tropical Deforestation last_img read more

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