Study: Psychedelic drug psilocybin helps depressed patients ‘re-connect’ to the world

first_imgShare on Twitter Share on Facebook Share “Although many of us think of psychedelics as dangerous drugs, it’s time for a rethink,” explained the study’s corresponding author, Rosalind Watts of Imperial College London. “When used carefully in clinical research settings, psychedelics have been reported to have a profoundly beneficial effect on many people’s lives. They are non-toxic, non- addictive, have very few side effects, and could potentially offer relief for people suffering from a range of psychological difficulties.”In the current qualitative study, which was published in the Journal of Humanistic Psychology, researchers interviewed patients from a clinical trial of psilocybin for treatment-resistant depression. (The initial results of the clinical trial were published in The Lancet.)“Working in a community mental health team, I realised that conventional mental health treatments (antidepressants, CBT) were not working for many people. I also watched my best friend struggle with depression for many years,” Watts told PsyPost.“When she told me she was going to do an ayahuasca ceremony in Peru, I knew nothing about psychedelic therapy research, and thought it was a terrible idea. But she came back home with a sparkle in her eye that I hadn’t seen for years, and told me that the depression had finally lifted. So I thought to myself ‘this looks promising, let’s find out more.’”A number of themes emerged after the researchers questioned 6 women and 13 men who had undergone psychedelic therapy 6 months prior.First, the participants described depression as a state of disconnection, which was reversed with psilocybin. Secondly, the psychedelic treatment helped them confront, process, and accept painful memories and thoughts. Thirdly, they described previous depression treatments as reinforcing the disconnection and avoidance they felt — while psilocybin worked in the opposite way.“The reset switch had been pressed so everything could run properly, thoughts could run more freely, all these networks could work again. It unlocked certain parts which were restricted before,” one participant explained.“I got a wider perspective, I stepped back. It helped me appreciate that the world is a big place that there’s a lot more going on than just the minor things that were going on in my head,” another participant told the researchers.A third remarked: “My previous treatments, talking therapy and meds, were next to useless, utterly useless. My experience of psilocybin has been very positive. I believe there is an unknown physiological and neurochemical change in me, I am absolutely convinced of that.”Or as another participante summed it up: “Now there’s a greater sense of ‘we’re all in the same boat’; less unease.”There were no serious adverse events reported during the psilocybin sessions. But a few participants had troubling psychological experiences which resolved themselves before the session was over. A few participants also wished they had received more psychotherapy following the drug session.“The psychedelic experience is not to be taken lightly,” Watts explained. “Participants in our study found psilocybin therapy to be preferable to other treatments they had tried, but that does not mean it was easy. Many of them had experiences of deep grief, sadness and fear, and relied upon the support of their ‘guides’ to enable them to fully accept and process these emotions. If any psychologists are interested in volunteering as a ‘guide’ they can get in touch at ros.watts@yahoo.co.uk.”“It’s very early days: the sample sizes are small, and we need to determine the role of placebo effects. Randomized control trials in the United States (John Hopkins, NYU) have started to address the question about placebo effects with similar promising findings. Upcoming randomized control trials in Europe will continue to investigate.”The study, “Patients’ Accounts of Increased “Connectedness” and “Acceptance” After Psilocybin for Treatment-Resistant Depression“, was also co-authored by Camilla Day, Jacob Krzanowski, David Nutt and Robin Carhart-Harris.Listen to Rosalind Watts discuss psilocybin treatment below: LinkedIncenter_img Email Pinterest New research sheds light on how psilocybin could help people overcome depressive symptoms. The psychedelic drug appears to promote a change from disconnection to connection and a change from avoidance to acceptance.Psilocybin is the primary mind-altering substance in psychedelic “magic” mushrooms. The drug can profoundly alter the way a person experiences the world by producing changes in mood, sensory perception, time perception, and sense of self.Scientists have recently starting re-examining at whether psilocybin can be used in the treatment of mental illnesses — and the initial results are promising.last_img read more

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NWS: Today’s High Near 82; Tonight’s Low Around 58

first_imgThe National Weather Service forecasts today’s high in Los Alamos near 82 with mostly sunny skies and tonight’s low around 58. Courtesy/NWSlast_img

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Norgen technology on show at valve world expo 2012

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

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Government to Invest $1.3 Million in restoration of Cultural Centers

first_img Tweet 354 Views   no discussions Share Share Sharecenter_img Sharing is caring! LocalNews Government to Invest $1.3 Million in restoration of Cultural Centers by: – January 28, 2019 The Ministry of Tourism and Culture has commenced construction, restoration and rehabilitation works at the Arawak House of Culture and the Old Mill Cultural Center.The Arawak House of Culture, one of the main locations for hosting of cultural events was severely impacted by Hurricane Maria.The extensive rehabilitation project valued at over $900,000.00 will include compete rehabilitation of the external and internal structures to include: roof; stage; seating; flooring; foyer and air conditioning.The rehabilitation will also include installation of a new sound and lighting system and artistic indoor and outdoor décor.In keeping with the Ministry’s Vision to develop Heritage Tourism and support the Arts, the Old Mill Cultural Center is also being upgraded. The Old Mill project valued at $600,000.00 includes construction of a permanent stage, restoration of Historic features of the property (Chimneys, Furnaces, Mills and Ruins), and installation of interpretation signage.These projects are geared to provide support for Arts and Culture and to promote Heritage and Cultural Tourism in Dominica and are targeted for completion by May 2019 to accommodate the DOMFESTA Celebrations.last_img read more

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Rosario Dawson says she’s unsure of her Marvel future

first_img Related David Lee/Netflix(LONDON) — Rosario Dawson’s return as Claire Temple in Marvel’s Luke Cage next month could possibly be her last stint as the character.According to ScreenGeek, Dawson, who’s character has appeared in Daredevil, Jessica Jones, Iron Fist and The Defenders, says she’s uncertain of Claire’s future after the second season of Luke Cage.“Yeah, its pretty wild actually,” she said at MCM ComicCon in London over the weekend. “I don’t know if I’ll be back after this, to be honest, but it’s been an amazing few years.”She continued, “I’ve been on a lot of different shows. I mean, I don’t know if maybe they do a third season of Luke Cage potentially, or maybe if they figure out some kind of way for me to be on The Punisher — just so I can feel like I’ve done every show.”According to Dawson, she’s not entirely upset about not returning to the hit series, since it would give her an opportunity to focus on family.“But it’s been like, my daughter is high school, so I kinda wanna not be 3,000 miles away for work,” she adds.Luke Cage Season 2 hits Netflix on June 22.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.Powered by WPeMaticolast_img read more

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Canadian pork exports to Japan catching up to the United States under

first_img Related Stories Canadian pork shipments to Japan saw a 122 per cent increase in February compared to the same month a year ago. February was the second month the new trade agreement was in effect.Scott Olson/Getty Images Twitter Canadian pork exports to Japan catching up to the United States under CPTPP Economists had warned that the preferential tariff treatment the bloc enjoyed would threaten the market share of American producers What you need to know about passing the family cottage to the next generation Canada and 5 other nations pull trigger on world’s biggest trade deal — leaving America out in the cold How government bureaucracy keeps blocking Canadians from building the critical infrastructure we need Comment Naomi Powell Join the conversation → Share this storyCanadian pork exports to Japan catching up to the United States under CPTPP Tumblr Pinterest Google+ LinkedIn Email Canadian pork exports to Mexico soar as trade wars bite U.S. farmers Facebook May 7, 201911:54 AM EDT Filed under News Economy advertisement 1 Comments Canadian pork exports to Japan are closing in on those of the United States as homegrown producers race to take advantage of a new Asia-Pacific trade deal abandoned by the U.S. in 2017.Canadian shipments of chilled pork meat to Japan hit 14,403 tonnes in February, the second month the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) was in effect, according to Japanese customs clearance data. The figure marks a 122 per cent increase compared to the same month a year ago and places Canada just behind the U.S. total of 14,599 tonnes.“The U.S. pulling out of the CPTPP is certainly one of the reasons we have had this chance to get ahead,” said Martin Lavoie, chief executive of Canada Pork International. “This has been a major opportunity and I think you will see the numbers jumping even more shortly.” Canada and 5 other nations pull trigger on world’s biggest trade deal — leaving America out in the cold Why Toyota’s new Canadian investment came for NAFTA but will (likely) stay for CETA First canola, now pigs: China blocks imports from two Canadian pork producers amid diplomatic row One of U.S. President Donald Trump’s first moves following his inauguration in 2017 was to withdraw from the Trans-Pacific Partnership — the signature trade policy of former president Barack Obama. Representing about 40 per cent of the world economy, supporters of the now-defunct TPP had hoped it would create a bloc to counter China’s economic might in the region.Instead, the remaining 11 countries entered into the revised CPTPP, prompting economists to warn that the preferential tariff treatment the bloc enjoyed would threaten the market share of American producers.“It certainly has hurt the U.S. in the short term, I think that’s fairly evident,” said Ted Bilyea, special adviser to the Canadian Agri-Food Policy Institute. “Whether that will be a medium- or long-term problem for them is the question right now.”Rising Canadian beef exports have taken an early spotlight, tripling to 3,545 tonnes in January 2019, according to Japanese import data, as tariffs fell to an initial 27.5 per cent from the standard rate of 38.5 per cent.Canadian pork exports have been making gains too, though the tariff advantage is less dramatic. Japanese levies on pork fell by half to an initial 2.25 per cent, but they will gradually be phased out altogether.Though the expansion in access for pork producers may be more modest, Canadian exporters have been aggressively exploiting it to gain a bigger foothold in the lucrative Japanese market, the largest for Canada by value and the third largest by volume.Companies such as Quebec-based Olymel LP have been retooling operations to produce the higher-value chilled pork favoured by Japanese consumers, Lavoie said, adding that Costco Wholesale Corp.’s 26 stores in Japan have now switched to 100-per-cent Canadian chilled pork.“It’s important for Canada because Japan is a unique market that can afford to pay for quality,” Bilyea said. “There’s a fair bit of value still to be had in these tariffs.”Industry leaders have cautioned that the CPPTP is still in its early days and trade fluctuations due to seasonality and other market factors can occur. Indeed, Japanese imports of Canadian beef slipped to 2,455 tonnes in February, suggesting “importers held back product until the CPTPP came into force in January to get the lower tariffs,” according to the Canadian Cattleman’s Association.Nevertheless, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe touted the benefits of the deal last week, with Trudeau noting that Canadian beef exporters had enjoyed a surge in shipments to Japan, “while the Americans do not have that kind of access.” The deal, he said, stood in “stark contrast” to rising protectionism in the U.S.Canadian pork exports are expected to increase by $639 million or 36.2 per cent, compared to $400 million under the TPP, according to federal government projections. Canadian beef exports to Japan are expected to increase by $378 million or 94.5 per cent, versus $228 million under the TPP.Just how long Canada’s edge lasts will depend on upcoming trade talks between the U.S. and Japan. Facing pressure from farmers, Trump has threatened to impose a 25-per-cent tariff on Japanese automobiles if the country doesn’t open its market to more U.S. beef and other agricultural products.A swift Japan-U.S. deal would dampen Canada’s advantage in commodities exports and could also deter Canadian companies from taking advantage of the opportunities to export value-added products under the deal, Bilyea said.“The issue is I don’t know how much companies would be willing to gear up and invest in producing those things for Japan if the U.S. gets a deal that gives them as much access,” he said. “We’re primarily commodity exporters, but if the U.S. doesn’t enter the agreement shortly, you’ll see a fair number of companies gear up to make products for Japan because it’s a tremendous opportunity.”Financial Post• Email: npowell@nationalpost.com | Twitter: Featured Stories More Sponsored By: Reddit ← Previous Next →last_img read more

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