NWS: Today’s High Near 82; Tonight’s Low Around 58

first_imgThe National Weather Service forecasts today’s high in Los Alamos near 82 with mostly sunny skies and tonight’s low around 58. Courtesy/NWSlast_img

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Air Products in good position

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UAL reaches halfway point of key cement contact

first_imgAccording to Haakon Rostad, UAL-SA managing director, UAL-SA is set to carry 65,000 tonnes of cement in one-tonne bags before completion of the contract in January 2010 for client Bechtel Construction.UAL opened a South African branch in Cape Town in July 2009 with the aim of bringing a local presence to the African market. For three decades, UAL had supplied the West African region from Europe and the US. The establishment of an office in Cape Town allows the line to supply African consignees from within Africa.Company CEO Roger Jungblat says: “South Africa is becoming an increasingly important source of supplies and services to support bustling activity in the West African oil theatre, stretching from Cape Town to Nigeria. The African Union is increasingly in favour of contained African trade, with a wealth of in-country laws requiring a large proportion of procurement to originate on the continent.”last_img read more

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Fandango’s four “Most Anticipated Movies of 2020” are all directed by women

first_img© 2018 WARNER BROS. ENTERTAINMENT INC.(LOS ANGELES) — Fandango has compiled its users’ most anticipated films of 2020, and for the first time ever, the top four are all directed by women. Patty Jenkins’ Wonder Woman 1984, Marvel’s Black Widow, and The Eternals, the latter two directed respectively by Cate Shortland and Chloe Zhao, and Disney’s upcoming live-action version of Mulan, which was directed by Niki Caro, all rank in that order as the year’s most anticipated films. No Time To Die, Daniel Craig’s last go-round as James Bond, ranked fifth.  That film was directed by Cary Joji Fukunaga, the only male director in the top five.Fandango also compiled lists in several categories, including Most Anticipated Villain.  Kristen Wiig as Cheetah in Wonder Woman 1984 topped the list, with Rami Malek as Safin in the Bond movie. Fandango’s Most Anticipated 2020 Movies survey results:Most Anticipated Movie1. Wonder Woman 1984 (release date June 5)2. Marvel’s Black Widow (May 1)3. Marvel’s Eternals (Nov. 6)4. Mulan (March 27)5. No Time to Die (April 10)6. A Quiet Place Part II (March 20)7. Birds of Prey (Feb. 7)8. In the Heights (June 26)9. Pixar’s Soul (June 19)10. Fast & Furious 9 (May 22)Most Anticipated Actress1. Gal Gadot — Wonder Woman 19842. Scarlett Johansson — Black Widow3. Emily Blunt — A Quiet Place Part II, Jungle Cruise4. Margot Robbie — Birds of Prey5. Zendaya — DuneMost Anticipated Actor1. Chris Pine — Wonder Woman 19842. Paul Rudd — Ghostbusters: Afterlife3. Ryan Reynolds — Free Guy4. Daniel Craig — No Time to Die5. Robert Downey Jr. — DolittleMost Anticipated Villain1. Kristen Wiig as Cheetah — Wonder Woman 19842. Rami Malek as Safin — No Time to Die3. McGregor as Black Mask — Birds of Prey4. Jim Carrey as Dr. Ivo Robotnik — Sonic the Hedgehog5. Charlize Theron as Cipher — Fast & Furious 9Most Anticipated Family Film1. Mulan2. Pixar’s Soul3. Sonic the Hedgehog4. Dolittle5. Jungle CruiseMost Anticipated Horror Film1. A Quiet Place Part II2. Halloween Kills3. The Invisible Man4. The Conjuring: The Devil Made Me Do It5. The GrudgeMost Anticipated Live-Action Comedy1. Ghostbusters: Afterlife2. Bill & Ted Face the Music3. Bad Boys For Life4. Legally Blonde 35. The LovebirdsCopyright © 2019, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Motel 6 faces another suit alleging it helped ICE target Latino guests

first_imgiStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) —  Motel 6 is facing a new federal lawsuit over allegations that the hotel chain’s employees regularly turned over guest information to immigration agents who scanned the lists and targeted people for detention.This is the second such lawsuit against the budget hotel chain this month, the first being filed by the Washington state Attorney General’s Office making similar allegations.The latest suit, filed Tuesday in U.S. District Court in Arizona as a class-action complaint by the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund (MALDEF) on behalf of unidentified Latino guests, calls the practice “racially discriminatory, unconstitutional, and violates laws that protect privacy rights and the rights of consumers.”The defendants are listed in the suit as Motel 6 Operating, L.P., a limited partnership that owns and manages Motel 6 hotels throughout the United States; G6 Hospitality LLC, which also owns and manages Motel 6 hotels throughout the United States; and “Defendants Does 1-10,” described as “unidentified employees who work or worked at the Motel 6 Phoenix West and Motel 6 Black Canyon locations and who disclosed the personal information of motel guests to DHS [U.S. Department of Homeland Security] and ICE [U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement] agents.”The employees did so, according to the suit, “without requiring a warrant or reasonable suspicion of criminal activity.The suit alleges that eight Latinos were targeted at different Motel 6 locations in Arizona. The plaintiffs, who are not named in the suit, were awakened by banging on their hotel doors or followed out of their cars in the hotel parking lots, according to the document.Seven of the eight were arrested, several faced bonds of thousands of dollars and one person was detained for 30 days, the suit says.Thomas A. Saenz, MALDEF president and general counsel, told ABC News the “suffering of entire families who simply sought to use the services of Motel 6” makes the case stand out.“Discrimination by motels and hotels was a central part of the struggle of African-Americans to root out Jim Crow in the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s,” Saenz said. “It is shocking that, nearly 20 years into the 21st century, a motel would discriminate against and victimize its guests in this way.”The plaintiffs suffered economic damages as well as “emotional distress, depression, anxiety, mental suffering, loss of liberty, fear, and humiliation,” the suit states. The suit is seeking a declaration that the practice of handing over guest information to agents for the Department of Homeland Security and Immigration and Customs Enforcement is a violation of federal law, as well as monetary damages and any other relief the court deems necessary.“I think that unless Motel 6 rapidly resolves these issues, it will face severe consequences with the Latino community,” Saenz said in his statement to ABC News. “Boycott calls, litigation, and public condemnation will continue and increase until Motel 6 demonstrates a real commitment to serving and helping the Latino immigrant community that patronizes so many of its Motel 6 locations.”G6 Hospitality did not immediately return ABC News’ request for comment. Earlier this month, after the news of the attorney general’s suit in Washington, a company spokesman told The Washington Post that Motel 6 takes “this matter very seriously, and we have and will continue to fully cooperate” with the investigation.That suit, also filed in Arizona federal court, alleged that agents scanned the lists for guests with “Latino-sounding names.”ICE is not named as a defendant in the class-action suit, just as it is not included in the Washington state suit. The agency, operating under the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, told ABC News Wednesday it “is not party to the litigation and as such, will not comment any further regarding the lawsuit.”But spokeswoman Yasmeen Pitts O’Keefe said in a statement, “It’s worth noting that hotels and motels have frequently been exploited by criminal organizations engaged in highly dangerous illegal enterprises, including human trafficking and human smuggling.”ICE gave the same reason earlier this month for not publicly discussing the Washington state suit, though also declining to comment on “the source of its enforcement leads.”Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.Powered by WPeMatico Relatedlast_img read more

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