People First, THEN Performance

first_imgOriginally posted on Cescobar.com. You can’t get to performance without people.Often, we seek out new leadership models, new approaches to innovation, new decision-making frameworks in organizations in hopes that we will help our people do their work smarter, faster, more effectively. Often, we do so at great expense, and at great risk.What we tend to overlook, however, is the role people play in performance.It’s far easier to send people to training, to have them adopt a new approach, or to change the way they do things than it is to embrace the incredible complexity of the humans in our organizations.But that’s precisely what we must do.How well do you know the person sitting in the office next door? What about in the office across the hall, down the hallway, across the courtyard, and at that off-site location? What do you know about them beyond their job title? What about the people you pass in the hallway every single day?Why do they do what they do?Who are they when they’re not at work?True performance, GREAT performance, happens when people trust and rely on each other. Training, approaches and strategies are important, but get supercharged when we factor in the humans in our organizations.It’s our job to build practices and environments that focus on people and relationships as much as processes. It’s our job to navigate the complexity of this task, knowing full well that while it may not be an easy sell in the c-suite, it’s where true performance begins.last_img read more

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RLPSA Names David Johnston, CFI as New Board President

first_imgThe Restaurant Loss Prevention and Security Association (RLPSA) has named David Johnston, CFI as the new Board President. Johnston is currently the Senior Director of Loss Prevention and Corporate Security for Dunkin’ Brands. After starting his loss prevention career as an Internal Investigator with Jordan Marsh, Dave has served both as a loss prevention leader and as a solution provider over the course of his 28-plus years in loss prevention, serving with J. Baker, LP Innovations, and Datavantage/Micros Systems as well as Dunkin’ Donuts. He holds an Associate’s degree in Criminal Justice from Bunker Hill Community College, and a Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice from the University of Massachusetts Lowell.“I wish to thank recent Past President Rob Holm, Anne Sullivan and Tamara Wasserman for their contributions as board members, and welcome Linda Zaziski from Little Caesar’s, Ken Gladney from Taco Bueno, and Steve Longo from Cap Index to our board,” says Johnston. “The ideas and efforts of those before us will be the springboard to continue to transform our industry and bring growth to our association… I thank you all for the opportunity to serve as President, and I, along with the board members look forward to a great year.”Congratulations Dave!- Sponsor – Stay UpdatedGet critical information for loss prevention professionals, security and retail management delivered right to your inbox.  Sign up nowlast_img read more

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Gene editing of dogs offers hope for treating human muscular dystrophy

first_img By Jon CohenAug. 30, 2018 , 2:00 PM About 13% of boys with DMD have mutations in a region between exon 45 and 50, which bumps exon 51 “out of frame” and throws a wrench into the cellular machinery that reads the gene’s instructions, stopping production of dystrophin. In 2009, a team led by Richard Piercy at the Royal Veterinary College in London identified a spaniel with signs of DMD that had a spontaneous mutation deleting exon 50, which similarly moves exon 51 out of frame. They later bred a relative of that dog with beagles, which have long been used in biomedical research, to create a colony with DMD symptoms.Together with Piercy’s group, Olson and colleagues designed CRISPR’s molecular scissors to make a cut at the beginning of exon 51 in the diseased beagles. The team hoped that when the cell tried to repair the slice, it would accidentally introduce errors to exon 51, leading its proteinmaking machinery to skip the exon altogether and produce a shortened but still functional dystrophin. (A newly approved drug for DMD, eteplirsen, promotes such exon-skipping as well, but its efficacy remains hotly debated.)Another challenge was to alter billions of muscle cells throughout a living animal. So the team enlisted a helper: a harmless adeno-associated virus that preferentially infects skeletal muscle and heart tissue. Two 1-month-old dogs received intramuscular injections of the virus, engineered to carry CRISPR’s molecular components. Six weeks later, those muscles were making dystrophin again. Those results led the researchers to give an intravenous infusion to two more dogs, also 1 month old, to see whether the CRISPR-carrying viruses could add the genome editor to muscles throughout the body. By 8 weeks, Olson told the meeting, dystrophin levels climbed to relatively high levels in several muscles, reaching 58% of normal in the diaphragm and 92% in the heart. But because the dogs were euthanized, Olson could show little evidence that they had avoided DMD symptoms, save for a dramatic video of a treated dog walking and jumping normally.”There are a lot of questions that have to be addressed,” acknowledges Leonela Amoasii, who works in Olson’s lab at UT Southwestern and is director of gene editing at Exonics. Skeletal muscle is constantly being replaced, so the treatment would have to reach its stem cells to avoid the need for repeated injections. Longer studies will be needed to make sure that the CRISPR treatment does not introduce cancer-causing mutations. Even if it safely restores the ability to make dystrophin, the treatment likely will only help boys who receive it early in life because the muscle damage is irreversible. And ultimately the treatment would have to target many other DMD-related mutations to help most boys with the disease. “We have to make sure that we dot all the i’s and cross all the t’s because the implications for both DMD and CRISPR therapy are immense,” Olson says. A colony of dogs at the Royal Veterinary College in London has a mutation that causes a disease similar to Duchenne muscular dystrophy. UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS SOUTHWESTERN MEDICAL CENTER Fighting fire with fire, researchers working with dogs have fixed a genetic glitch that causes Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) by further damaging the DNA. The unusual approach, using the genome editor CRISPR, allowed a mutated gene to again make a key muscle protein. The feat—achieved for the first time in a large animal—raises hopes that such genetic surgery could one day prevent or treat this crippling and deadly disease in people. An estimated 300,000 boys around the world are currently affected by DMD.The study monitored just four dogs for less than 2 months; more animal experiments must be done to show safety and efficacy before human trials can begin. Even so, “I can’t help but feel tremendously excited,” says Jennifer Doudna of the University of California, Berkeley, who heard the results last week at a CRISPR meeting she helped organize. “This is really an indication of where the field is heading, to deliver gene-edited molecules to the tissues that need them and have a therapeutic benefit. Obviously, we’re not there yet, but that’s the dream.”The study, which also appears online this week in Science, was led by molecular biologist Eric Olson of the University of Texas (UT) Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, whose team earlier had similar results in mice. “We wanted to put this to the ultimate test and see if we could do it in a large animal,” Olson says. The positive findings—CRISPR quickly restored the protein dystrophin in critical body muscles, including the heart—”brought tears to the eyes and were jaw-dropping,” he says.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The study offers little evidence that dogs regained muscle function, however, and that, coupled with the short duration of the study and the small number of animals studied, left some scientists less enthusiastic. One researcher in the tight-knit DMD field who asked not to be named wonders whether the study was rushed to help draw investment in Exonics Therapeutics, a Boston-based company Olson launched last year to develop the potential treatment.Olson says his team worked quickly not because of corporate ambitions, but rather to prove the concept before expanding to longer, more thorough dog experiments that ultimately are needed to launch human trials. The few animals initially studied, he adds, reflects sensitivities about experimenting with dogs. “We’re very mindful of ethical concerns and have done our best to keep our use of dogs to an absolute minimum.”The dystrophin gene, the largest in the human body, contains 79 separate coding regions, or exons, that work together to create a protein that has 3500 amino acids. That much DNA offers a lot of opportunities for mutations that can cause DMD. But only one functional copy of the gene is needed, and because it sits on the X chromosome, girls have a backup copy. Boys with their one copy disabled develop walking problems early in life and die on average in their mid-20s from heart and respiratory failure.center_img Gene editing of dogs offers hope for treating human muscular dystrophy Royal Veterinary College Dystrophin (green) is abundant in normal dog muscle cells (left), almost absent in those of a beagle with a muscular dystrophy (middle), and partially restored in an affected beagle treated with CRISPR (right).last_img read more

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Indian television has come a long way since its hesitant and humble beginnings

first_imgIt started with a whimper but by the end of the decade, Indian television had arrived with a bang. The New Delhi Asian Games opened the floodgates for the small screen revolution, introducing new and far reaching horizons in communications and overnight altering priorities for sponsors and advertising agencies. In,It started with a whimper but by the end of the decade, Indian television had arrived with a bang. The New Delhi Asian Games opened the floodgates for the small screen revolution, introducing new and far reaching horizons in communications and overnight altering priorities for sponsors and advertising agencies. In terms of sheer growth, the television industry had no equal.When the then Prime minister Indira Gandhi declared a state of emergency at midnight on June 25,1975, and went on television the next evening to justify her desperate action, only about five million Indians could have watched her in awed suspense. This year, when Rajiv Gandhi put up a virtuoso performance at the National Press Club in Washington, it showered down live on nearly six million TV sets with 60 million Indians watching and the setting ranging from rural community viewing centres to cozy living-rooms.Ten years ago, viewers grew weary of watching Mrs Gandhi cutting ribbons and deplaning at airports, with the only respite being provided by the weekly Chitrahaar and the Sunday feature film. Caustic critics nicknamed it “Devidarshan” and sent up slogans like “Tedium is the message.”Today, the range is phenomenally greater with the plethora of sponsored programmes – good, bad and indifferent. Indians are now witness to the television star phenomenon, something just not possible five years ago, and Indian children can now track the adventures of their favourite Walt Disney characters in live animation rather than from comic strips.With two million sets – including 800,000 colour sets – crossing the shop counters this year, at least four Indian homes are acquiring TV sets every minute of the day.Ten years ago, TV sets were mere status symbols, to be shown off than to be seen. The presence of a lone TV antenna atop a building turnedthe neighbours envious. Today, even a slum like Dharavi is crawling with antennae and even colour television has ceased to be an oddity.advertisementThe statistics are mind-boggling. From a mere 404 licences issued in 1965 and 4,55,430 in 1975, the number of sets was counted at 5.2 million when the licensing system was abolished early this year. And, with two million sets – including 800,000 colour sets – crossing the shop counters this year, at least four Indian homes are now acquiring TV sets every minute of the day.Even in 1982, just before the Asiad, there were only 16 transmitters beaming programmes to less than 8 per cent of people who could receive it on their sets. Today, 180 transmitters raise their steel torsos across the country, transmitting signals or beaming them via satellite to a potential audience that is 70 per cent of the nation’s population.From being a strictly evening ritual, the transmission hours now spill late into the night on weekdays and take up almost the whole of a Sunday. And the electronic deluge that has covered only 50 million Indians so far promises to swamp 300 million of them in another five years when an astounding 30 million sets will go into operation.Few countries in the world have seen such expensive bouts of television expansion. The Indian television industry’s rate of growth is nearly 50 per cent for this year alone. This, over an already impressive base of six million – only two million short of the number of TV sets in Britain.”Good programmes are like a habit-forming drug and we have injected that into society. Now watch the reaction.”V.N. Gadgill minister of state for Information and BroadcastingBy 1990, India will have drawn close to China with its estimated 35 million sets. “The growth of the television medium in India,” says Granada network chairman Sir Denis Forman, “is a stupendous phenomenon and the country has turned into a laboratory for communication experts.”But the real success of Indian television and Doordarshan, the Government authority that has been its midwife as well as possessive mother, lies in having turned the box from a propaganda platform into a major money-spinning entertainment arena.”Good programmes are like a habit-forming drug, and we have injected that into the society. Now watch the reaction,” boasts Minister of State for Information and Broadcasting V.N. Gadgil, himself a TV addict. And the ‘drug’ is coming not in niggardly doses but in torrents, largely because of the involvement of the private sector in making programmes for the box.In 1976, the Indian Market Research Bureau (IMRB), a prominent market research organisation, found only three programmes watched regularly by over 70 per cent of the viewers: Chhaya Geet (Bombay’s name for Chitrahaar), a melange of clips from singing scenes in popular films; Phool Khile Hain Gulshan Gulshan, a trivial and tacky talk show on film personalities interspersed with film clippings, and of course the weekly Hindi feature film.advertisementYeh Jo Hai Zindagi: Record audiencesBut last fortnight IMRB published a new television ratings points study (TRPS) which showed even the light sitcom Yeh Jo Hai Zindagi making it to the top of the charts at many places, including Bombay.Meanwhile, the survey shows that the feature film has slid down the ladder to the ninth position in Bombay, eighth in Delhi, and fifth in Madras while Phool Khile barely makes it to the bottom rung and that too only in Calcutta.”Television sneaked quietly into Indian life as a leisure alternative,” says Amit Khanna, a painstaking chronicler of the industry who himself makes television programmes now. “But when television came, the whole family was sold over to it. You watch as long as you like it When you don’t just flick the button.”But millions of families refused to flick the button when the possibilities of the medium first began to unfold. First came the coverage of the Montreal Olympics in 1976 and then the draw of the live telecast of cricket Test matches.For the first time film producers began talking about “low collection” because of cricket telecasts and started adjusting film release dates accordingly. The five-day match telecasts seemed boring to some but to many others it opened new opportunity for watching pleasure.”The live sports coverage’s were only a precursor, a sign of the times to come,” says Harish Khanna, debonair director-general of Doordarshan who was imaginatively chosen by Indira Gandhi in 1984 so that he could apply to Indian television the broadcasting experience acquired by him in the BBC where he had worked.”The growth of the TV medium in India is a stupendous phenomenon and the country is a laboratory for communication experts.”Denis Forman chairman, Granada networkThe real lift-off was in end-1982 when the challenge of telecasting the Asiad in New Delhi spawned all the trappings of a modern television society.Enter colour, shakily at first with the intensity of definition often fluctuating, but more assuredly with time. The number of transmitters went up from 16 prior to the Asiad to 41 during the games. The camera units began moving out of doors, their mobility greatly enhanced by newly-acquired outdoor broadcasting (OB) vans.Khanna recalls that the “insatiable hunger” for quality programmes was felt as early as 1975 when India decided to try the “slower option” by availing itself for one year only, the facility of satellite hook-up offered by the geostationary American satellite ATS-6.The programme called Satellite Instructional Television Experiment (SITE) was beamed to community sets in six rural clusters. It was an instant success.Says Gadgil: “The writing on the wall was very clear. Through television we have always wanted to educate people, to entertain them, and to inform. But after the expansion during the Asiad we reached the conclusion that none of the objectives could be fulfilled if the programmes lacked life.”advertisementThe cash registers never stopped ringing. Doordarshan, which had netted only Rs 77 lakh ten years ago, recorded a commercial revenue of Rs 32 crore last year alone.But even after attaining a sizeable reach, tedium was the sum total of its message throughout 1983 and most of 1984. Its news broadcast was (and still largely is) a grim litany of ministerial activities and an unending catalogue of ribbons cut and homilies uttered by the political master of the day.Its documentaries, barring a few golden exceptions, reeked of mindless bureaucracy. Reminisces S.S. Gill, who retired as information and broadcasting secretary last fortnight, but not before he had played a pivotal role in changing the face of television in the country: “After the Asiad we began having everything for television except only one thing: soul!”Two years later Gill was decorated with the Padma Bhushan for his epochal contribution to Indian television. It was during Gill’s stewardship of the ministry that the biggest breakthrough came when Doordarshan started accepting privately sponsored programmes.The advertisers were not even curious in the beginning and were happy with a flood of commercial spots, all cluttered before and after the film-based programmes. Thus, when Hum Log began 16 months ago, Gill was camping in Bombay, imploring companies to sponsor it.TV crusader Rajani: Raising social awarenessHowever, Hum Log caught the imagination of television viewers and triggered off a tornado of change. Software making companies mushroomed overnight. From virtually no takers in the middle of 1984, there are now 15 contenders on an average for each of the prime-time slots that Doordarshan can offer. From purely a buyer’s market, air-time entered the seller’s market.”It is the most persuasive, the most cost-effective and the quickest medium.” says Mike Khanna, the chief of Hindustan Thomson Associates (HTA), the advertising agency which enjoys top billing in the country.”No other medium offers such a high recall value,” echoes A.G. Krishnamurthy of Mudra Communications which sponsors Rajani. As late as 1983 Lakme Industries, one of the cosmetic leaders were spending only 25 per cent of their advertising budget on television campaigns. This year they are spending 80 per cent.But while advertisers were chasing targets of sales – and a maddening assortment of consumer products – an altogether new range of sponsored programmes began unravelling on the box, some good, some not-so-good, but nearly all finding niches in the popular mind. “The small screen is big business today, bigger than the Rs 110 crore movie industry,” quips Amit Khanna. But more than business the box began beckoning people to a new horizon of communication.”After the Asiad we began having everything for television except only one thing: soul!”S.S. Gill former secretary, Ministry of Information and BroadcastingThe first and most direct impact of this change was on people’s life-styles. The number of products jingling their way through ads saw the growth of an increasingly consumerist social attitude. Things looked good up there and the new commercial idiom was hard-sell.At the same time, TV and video dealt the cinema a blow from which it still has to recover. While the family clustered around the idiot box, movie halls began noticing a gradual but alarming drop in collections.The final proof of the film industry having succumbed to the threat of television came when established film makers like Mahesh Bhatt and Govind Nihalani premiered their Janam and Party respectively on television.But particularly significant was its subtle impact on politics. Rajiv Gandhi realised it from day one, when the lingering last shot of Doordarshan’s telecast of Mrs Gandhi’s funeral, silhouetting the young and handsome new prime minister against the setting sun, formed an everlasting image. But propaganda was not its only use and thankfully so. A breakthrough of sorts came with Janvaani, an on-screen inquisition of ministers which had a cathartic effect on the audience, offering them a token reassurance that inefficiency would find no place under the new dispensation.”The small screen is big business today, bigger than the Rs 110 crore movie industry.”Amit Khanna film makerThe television camera followed the prime minister on his tours of tribal areas and foreign soil, admittedly with much more professional skill than in Mrs Gandhi’s time. Television had come of age as the most potent tool for the manipulation of minds.While the Government tended to handle it politically, flinching from every suggestion of granting it autonomy (“It is irrelevant,” said Gadgil) air-time was choc-a-bloc with sponsored programmes – Khandaan, an Indian variant of Dynasty, a serial based on an adaptation of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, a private-eye serial called Karamchand, the news-based Newsline, a Sunday quiz show, Darpan – a serial based on short stories in Indian languages – and a host of other serials, besides the highly rated sitcoms, Yeh Jo Hai Zindagi, Rajani and Hum Log.The private sector was cautiously allowed to nibble at current affairs, hitherto a closed preserve of Doordarshan. And the cash register never stopped ringing. Doordarshan, which had netted only Rs 77 lakh ten years ago, recorded a commercial revenue of Rs 32 crore last year alone.Doordarshan Director-General Harish Khanna forcefully argues that the revenue has grown without any strings attached. “Only 4.8 per cent of TV time is used for commercials,” he says.Hum Log: The path-breaking serialBut with the distinct possibility of nearly Rs 50 crore in revenue next year – a quarter of the money to be spent on advertisements for consumer products nation-wide – advertisers do not want to take chances.”As matters stand now,” says Mike Khanna, “the agency and the advertisers are kept only on the fringe for sponsored programmes. The producers deal directly with Doordarshan, get concept approval and air time allotted and then shop around for buyers.”The advertisers want more of the “message”, much more than what Doordarshan now allows by way of 90 seconds of free time for 25 minutes of sponsored programme. So far Doordarshan has resisted the pressure, but it cannot hold out for long if the gap in programme value between its own product and that implemented by the private sector widens.And to make it possible, Doordarshan has to yank itself out of the Government-job syndrome, paying its staff fair wages and not just government pay scales and raise their level of training and intellect.Ten years ago, it was an extended public address system for politicians. Today, it is a gigantic window through which 50 million Indians peer at the world.But the winds of change are inexorable. Sponsored programmes with their sheer mass appeal have given Doordarshan a competitive edge. And the overwhelming power of the idiot box is being felt like never before. Ten years ago, it was an extended public address system for politicians. Today, it is a gigantic window through which 50 million Indians peer at the world.last_img read more

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Mass Appeal Folds

first_imgIn a refrain that’s becoming all-too-familiar for nichemusic magazine publishers, Mass Appeal, the 12-year-old Brooklyn-based hip-hop and lifestylemagazine, is calling it quits.The 100,000-circulation title had recently publishedits 50th issue.Colossal Media, which owns Mass Appeal, will continue topublish a female-targeted spin-off, Missbehave,as well as Mass Appeal’s Web site.Co-founder and publisher Adrian Moeller told the Web siteGawker that he is in talks to sell the Mass Appeal, and that a print edition of may eventually relaunch. In 2005, Patrick Elasik, the magazine’s 26-year-old co-founderand co-owner, was founddead. He had been electrocuted while crossing subway tracks in theGreenpoint section of Brooklyn.Elasik founded the magazine with Moeller in 1996.The shuttering of Mass Appeal is the third nationally-distributedniche music title to do so this year. In February, Seattle-based alternativecountry music magazine NoDepression folded; Harp followed suit. InMarch, Resonance, a small, well-regarded Seattle-based quarterly, shut down.last_img read more

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WHS SOFTBALL Wildcats Crush Belmont For First Victory Of Season

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — The Wilmington High School Varsity Softball team got its first win of the year by defeating Belmont, 7-0, on the road on Thursday, April 12.Junior Ally Moran pitched a gem of a game, tossing a 3-hit (2 infield singles) and 12-strikeout shutout. Offensively, Moran went 2-4, with a double, run scored and 2 RBI.Antonia Kieran (1 RBI) went 3-4 with a triple and a stolen base. Ryan Bailey (2 RBI) had a homerun overturned when it was ruled a ground-rule double. Emily Wright came on to pinch hit and got the last RBI in the contest.In the fourth inning, a great defensive play was turned in by the combination of shortstop Dana Goulet, first baseman Antonia Kieran and catcher Aliyah Tang, when they completed a 6-3-2 double play.Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedWHS SOFTBALL: Wildcats Lose To Melrose By 1 Run, Storm Back With 12-Run Win Over Greater LowellIn “Sports”WHS SOFTBALL: Wildcats Defeat Greater Lowell Tech & Stoneham, Qualify For State TournamentIn “Sports”WHS SOFTBALL: Wildcats Wrap Up Regular Season With 10-0 WinIn “Sports”last_img read more

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Modi Gets Cracking on StateOwned Institutions to Spend 19bn Cash Hoard

first_imgThe Centre is increasing the pressure on state-owned institutions to put their cash holdings for better use – spending.Coal India Ltd (CIL) has been told to step up its outlay of major investments, which would boost the economy. Government sources have indicated that the pace of capital expenditure is to be reviewed more frequently. Reuters$19 billion cash hoardFive of India’s major state-owned institutions – Coal India, Oil and Natural Gas Corp, Bharat Heavy Electricals Ltd, NTPC (National Thermal Power Corporation) Ltd, and NMDC (National Mineral Development Corporation) Ltd, are sitting on cash and equivalents, worth $19 billion, as per stock exchange fillings. The funds, if effectively used, could help with furthering investments, which would allow the economic growth Prime Minister Narendra Modi speaks of.ONGC Chairman Dinesh Kumar Sarraf noted that the government wants them to invest more, including to “acquire more assets.”The revised statistics released last week showed that India had expanded by 6.9% up to March 2014. The data has been based on an updated model of economic growth calculation.State-controlled companies have been instructed to explore opportunities in domestic and international arena, for key asset purchase, joint ventures with other government agencies and public-private partnership (PPP) to increase investment.Meanwhile, NTPC’s finance director Kulamani Biswal said the power generator would invest about $4 billion annually over the next five years.Increase Capital ExpenditureThe 60-member S&P BSE India public sector undertaking index rose by 49% over the previous year, compared to a 43% gain in the benchmark S&P BSE Sensex.Karvy Stock Brokering Ltd’s head of fundamental research Jagannadham Thunuguntla remarked that increase in investments by government-controlled organisations would be a “game changer,” as it could trigger an avalanche of economic activity and would help see an uptick in fresh gross domestic product. ReutersA Deutsche Bank report, authored by its economists Taimur Baig and Kaushik Das on 23 January, spoke of state-owned companies becoming the probable main drivers of capital expenditure recovery.India has a legacy of missing opportunities, with red-tape and bureaucratic inefficiency contributing to a list of missed spending targets. Coal India alone has an unenviable record of missing output goals on the back of insufficient investment and clogging up of the railway rake availability. Funds allocated for buying overseas mines remain mostly unused.Encash DividendsEven as the Modi government is rushing to sell stock holdings in state-owned entities, many argue that it would be better for the government to seek a higher amount as dividend, while also maintaining its holding in the state-owned entities. Such funds could be used in the budget for key investment projects, said Samiran Chakraborty, head of regional research at Standard Chartered Plc.For the current fiscal year, Finance Ministry is expecting to mop up ₹27,800 crore in dividends.A panel set up to breathe life into stalled projects have cleared almost $111 billion, since June 2013. A further $200 billion awaits approval.Investment revival is dependent on faster approval and easing of the land acquisition process, which the Narendra Modi government tackled last month through an ordinance to the Land Acquisition Act.last_img read more

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Why top actresses Rakul Keerthy and Rashmika agreed to work with Nithiin

first_imgNithiin with Rashmika and Bheeshma team at its launchTwitterAfter a series of flop films, actor Nithiin (Nithin/Nitin) is set to romance top actresses like Rakul Preet Singh, Keerthy Suresh and Rashmika Mandanna in his next three projects.Nithiin, who made his acting debut with director Teja’s 2002 film Jayam, has delivered some notable superhit movies like Dil, Ishq and A Aa in his career spanning 17 years. Of late, the career of producer Sudhakar Reddy’s son is going through a rough patch with hat-trick failures like LIE, Chal Mohan Ranga and Srinivasa Kalyanam at the box office. He is apparently struggling to bring back his fallen glory.Nithiin is eyeing young and successful directors and actresses to score a big hit for himself at the box office. In 13 days, the actor has announced three big-ticket projects, which will be directed by Venky Kudumula, Chandrasekhar Yeleti and Venky Atluri. Rashmika Mandanna, Rakul Preet Singh and Keerthy Suresh are playing female leads opposite him in these movies.Rashmika Mandanna will be seen with Nithiin in Bheeshma. After launching this film on June 11, the actor tweeted a couple of photos and wrote, “BHEESHMA muhurtham done.. shoot starts frm the 20th of this month.. This film wil ENTERTAIN U all #BheeshmaLaunch ⁦@iamRashmika⁩ ⁦@VenkyKudumula⁩ @vamsi84 ⁦@sitharaents.”As he began shooting for Bheeshma from ‏June 20, Nithiin took to his Twitter account to share his joy. He wrote, “Almost after an Year I am back in front of the camera. A new day, new look, a new character. Very Excited to kickstart this new journey… BHEESHMA shoot begins!! ⁦@VenkyKudumula⁩ ⁦@iamRashmika⁩ ⁦@vamsi84⁩ ⁦@SitharaEnts⁩.”Just two days after beginning Bheeshma shoot, Nithiin had the opening ceremony of the Chandrasekhar Yeleti-directed movie, which is yet-to-be titled. Interestingly, the actor will romance two actresses Rakul Preet Singh and Priya Prakash Varrier. It is not clear when its shoot begins. Nithiin with Priya Prakash Warrier at the launch of Chandrasekhar Yelleti’s filmTwitterNithiin tweeted on June 22, “#Nithiin28 muhurtham done.. super excited to work with Yeleti Chandrashekar garu..this film is goin to b Special!! ⁦@Rakulpreet⁩ finallyyy workin together #priyaprakashvarrier plays d other lead,produced by bhavya anand prasad garu n music by ⁦@mmkeeravaani⁩ garu.”The actor took to Twitter this morning again and this time to announce another project titled Rang De, which is directed by Venky Atluri. Nithiin will be seen romancing Keerthy Suresh, who stunned everyone with her amazing performance in blockbuster movie Mahanati, which hit screens May 9, 2018.Nithiin tweeted on June 24, “#Nithiin29 is titled as RANG DE! Working with the Young n talented dir Venky atluri, costarring ⁦@KeerthyOfficial⁩ n produced by ⁦@vamsi84⁩ ⁦@SitharaEnts⁩ AND cinematography by my ALL TIME FAV D.o.P ⁦@pcsreeram⁩ sir #RangDe #gimmesomelove.” Nithin’s Rang De logo posterTwitterNithin’s back-to-back announcements have come as big surprise for many in the Telugu film industry, who are wondering over why these top actresses preferred to work with a flop hero. However, these heroines obviously have reasons for signing his projects. Either they have got interesting roles in them, or they might have received a hefty amount as remunerations.Rakul Preet Singh, Keerthy Suresh and Rashmika Mandanna have huge fanbases and they are among the most sought-after actresses down south. Their presence will surely get more attention for Nithiin’s upcoming projects and make their fans watch those films. If the scripts and their roles are good, they are likely to get him back-to-back hits for the struggling actor.last_img read more

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Matrimonycom posts Rs 300 crore in revenues for FY2017 IPO likely in

first_imgA traditional South Indian wedding (representational image).Commons wikipediaMatrimony.com, which owns BharatMatrimony, the online portal for matrimonial listings, clocked revenues of around Rs. 300 crore for 2016-17. The Chennai-based company is all set to hit the capital markets in the second quarter this fiscal.”Our revenues was just above Rs. 300 crore…I can’t divulge other details given that we are in the process of our initial public offering (IPO),” founder-CEO Murugavel Janakiraman told the International Business Times India edition.The IPO will comprise fresh shares in addition to stake sale by existing investors including founder-CEO Murugavel Janakiraman. “Obviously, there will be some dilution of stake by existing investors apart from fresh issues of share during the IPO,” the 47-year-old entrepreneur said. The three investors are Bressmer Venture Partners, JPMorgan Partners and Mayfield. The Chennai-based company had to shelve its IPO plans last year due to “weak market conditions”.The company that owns few other matchmaking portals in addition to BharatMatrimony, will have to go in for fresh approval from capital markets regulator Sebi since the earlier one expired last December.Janakiraman refused to divulge the IPO size and other details or for that matter, the percentage of stake sale by the existing investors, saying they are still being worked out.In its draft prospectus filed in August 2015, Matrimony.com had sought permission from Sebi to raise Rs. 350 crore by way of fresh issue of shares, in addition to offer for sale (OFS) by existing investors.  The document said the company’s revenues for 2014-15 stood at Rs. 242.84 crore, most of which came from matchmaking services. Profit before exceptional items was Rs. 11.2 crore. The exceptional item referred to was legal expenses amounting to Rs. 14.62 crore incurred on a case in New Jersey.Matrimony.com’s rivals include People Group’s shaadi.com and Info Edge’s jeevansathi.com.Highlights of the draft prospectus filed by Matrimony.com in August 2015:Based on the Marriage Services Report (prepared for the company by KPMG), it is also estimated that approximately 65% of the Indian population is under 35 years. The young base will get married in the next two decades and result in an average of 10 to 12 million weddings per year until fiscal 2025.The six subsidiaries of Matrimony.com are: Community Matrimony Private Limited; Sys India Private Limited; Matchify Services Private Limited; Tambulya Online Marketplace Private Limited; Consim Info USA. Inc. and BharatMatrimony LLC.Murugavel Janakiraman held 11,768, 137 (11.76 million) shares, or 79.63 percent, of the total share capital, as of August 4, 2015.last_img read more

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Rajbari road crash kills 2

first_imgA rickshaw-puller and his passenger were killed and two others injured when a speeding inter-city bus hit them near the Jamidar Bridge in Goalando of Rajbari district on Wednesday evening, reports UNB.The deceased are rickshaw-puller Md Salam Khan, 45, son of Darog Ali Khan, and the passenger Md Nazim Uddin Sheikh, 50, son of late Juran Sheikh, both are residents of Sarupar Chak village in Goalando upazila.Witnesses said a Barisal-bound bus of Eagle Paribahan coming from Dhaka smashed into Salam’s rickshaw.Goalando Ghat police station officer-in-charge Mirza Abul Kalam Azad confirmed the incident.last_img read more

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