1time to start flying from Lanseria

first_imgRay Maota An aircraft from the 1time Airlines fleet.(Image: jetphotos.net) Gavin Sayce says Lanseria is known for itshigh service levels and convenience.(Image: Engineering News)MEDIA CONTACTS• Gavin SayceLanseria International Airport Manager+27 11 659 2750RELATED ARTICLES• Lanseria International Airport• New airport nears completion• Zambezi Airlines lands in SA• OR Tambo spreads its wingsLow-cost airline 1time will begin flying from Lanseria International Airport, north-west of Johannesburg, in 2011 – a move that will benefit the airport as well as the carrier.“There are also several African airlines which have also expressed interest in flying from the airport,” said Gavin Sayce, Lanseria airport manager.“The ending of a five-year exclusivity agreement between Lanseria and Kulula Airlines operator, Comair, has opened the market for new operators and has also prompted these upgrades,” said Sayce.Kulula Airlines is one of South Africa’s most popular budget airlines, the others being 1time and Mango. Kulula has been operating from Lanseria since 2006.“The sub-Saharan African air market is opening up rapidly and Lanseria is ideally placed to serve it,” he added.Facilities upgradedThe airport plans to build a new runway, a multi-storey parkade, improve its shuttle service and is also in talks with the hospitality industry about building a hotel in the airport grounds.Sayce said: “Plans for an upgraded runway have been on the drawing board for some time, but we put the project on ice due to the 2010 Fifa World Cup.”Lanseria’s apron, where the aircraft refuel, load, unload and park, can accommodate six narrow-body aircrafts at one time, but has capacity for this to be extended to nine.Last year the airport increased its parking to 1 800 bays. Additional parking will be accommodated in the new multi-storey parkade.“While the airport’s domestic terminal is reaching capacity, there is still room for expansion in international departures to cope with growing regional flights,” said Sayce.Tapping into exclusive market“We are in advanced talks with Lanseria’s management and expect to begin flights from the airport in the first half of next year,” said Glenn Orsmond, CEO of 1time Airlines, in the Business Day.“We have submitted our schedules and we are in the process of ironing out the final details of the agreement,” he added.In addition to various domestic routes, the airline already has flights to Livingstone in Zambia, Zanzibar and Maputo. Orsmond said: “We will continue to apply for rights to new African routes as they come up.”With 1time now also appealing to an exclusive market of travellers who prefer Lanseria to bigger airports such as OR Tambo, east of Johannesburg, Kulula plans to expand its presence there.Kulula has already secured the rights for flights between Lanseria and Maputo. Gidon Novick, joint CEO of Comair said: “We will also add further domestic flights once the new runway is in place.” The airline already flies, on average, seven times a day to Cape Town and six times to Durban from the airport.Sayce said: “In the past five years since Kulula launched its first flight, the airport has grown rapidly and this year more than a million passengers used the airport.“For us the challenge is to keep the service levels and convenience of a small facility, while expanding the airport. That is what sets Lanseria apart from other airports.”VIPs prefer Lanseria Lanseria is Gauteng province’s second international airport and is privately owned. The other is the more high-profile OR Tambo International, which is still the entry point for most commercial travellers into South Africa. Lanseria is the preferred entry point for celebrities, heads of state and other VIPs.Lanseria was launched in 1972 by two pilots from Pretoria, Fanie Haacke and Abe Sher. The facility was opened to air traffic by the then minister of transport, Hannes Rall, on 16 August 1974. On that day, a Learjet ZS-MTD was the first plane to land at the new facility.In 1975 Lanseria was chosen to host Air Africa International, an air show, which was a major event on the international aerospace calendar.When former president Nelson Mandela was released from prison in May 1990, he was flown to Johannesburg via Lanseria.In the same year, Lanseria’s co-owners, the Roodepoort and Krugersdorp Municipalities and the Transvaal Administrator, announced that the airport was to be sold. It was brought to tender and the tender was awarded to a consortium of private investors in 1991.Government concerns such as immigration; border police, which is part of the South African Police Service; customs and health; nature conservation; agriculture; national intelligence and veterinarian services are all represented at Lanseria.The airport has a large variety of aviation-related tenants, ranging from scheduled and charter operators to aircraft sales, freight services, flight schools, and other maintenance services such as engineering, upholstery and spray-painting. Wi-fi access, foreign exchange and duty-free shopping are also available.last_img read more

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Mystery nodding syndrome may be triggered by parasitic worm

first_imgA boy receives ivermectin to prevent river blindness. Some think the drug may also prevent nodding syndrome. By Gretchen VogelFeb. 15, 2017 , 2:00 PM ISSOUF SANOGO/Staff/Getty Images Mystery nodding syndrome may be triggered by parasitic worm Between 1990 and 2013, thousands of children in war-torn South Sudan and northern Uganda suddenly developed a severe and puzzling form of epilepsy. When exposed to food or cold temperatures, affected children nodded their heads uncontrollably. Over time the seizures often worsened, leaving the children severely disabled. Many died of malnutrition, accidents, or secondary infections.In some communities, roughly half of families had at least one child with the condition, called nodding syndrome; by 2013, an estimated 1600 children in Uganda were affected. But the cause of the devastation was a mystery. Now, a study finds that a parasitic worm often found in the children might trigger the body’s own defenses to attack neurons.The study doesn’t prove the worm is the culprit, but it “is the first to show that a cause-effect relationship is plausible,” says Hermann Feldmeier, a parasitologist at the Charité University Hospital in Berlin, who was not involved in the study.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The rash of cases in Uganda and South Sudan triggered an intense hunt for the cause, but searches for viruses, bacteria, environmental toxins, genetic factors, and nutritional deficits all came up empty. One key clue: Areas with nodding syndrome also had high rates of onchocerciasis, an infection with the parasitic worm Onchocerca volvulus. Spread through the bites of black flies, which breed in swift-flowing streams, the worms can invade the eye, and the infection is commonly known as river blindness. The World Health Organization estimates that at least 18 million people, most in sub-Saharan Africa, are infected.Researchers had suggested as early as the 1960s that high rates of epilepsy in Tanzania, with similar nodding symptoms, might be related to onchocerciasis. Others have noted that children with nodding syndrome are more likely to be infected than their healthy peers. But there’s no evidence that the worm invades the brain or directly causes seizures.Some researchers suggested that the worm instead causes an autoimmune reaction that damages the nervous system. Searches for antibodies that might play an autoimmune role had come up empty. But neuroimmunologists Avindra Nath and Tory Johnson of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, decided to use an improved protein chip to screen for antibodies to thousands of proteins at once.The new tool proved its worth. Blood from nodding syndrome patients reacted strongly to four proteins; in the case of one protein, called leiomodin-1, patient sera reacted 33,000 times more strongly than did sera from unaffected controls. The researchers then looked for the antibodies causing the reaction. As they report this week in Science Translational Medicine, antibodies to leiomodin-1 turned up in 29 of 55 nodding syndrome patients but only 17 of 55 controls. Patients also carried much higher antibody levels than controls.Leiomodin-1, which likely plays a role in cell shape, is found in smooth muscle and thyroid cells. Johnson’s team showed that it is expressed in the nervous system and brain, too. They also found a clue to what might trigger an autoimmune reaction to the protein: Several O. volvulus proteins resemble it. After the immune system gears up to fight the worm, similarities between an O. volvulus protein and leiomodin-1 may cause the antibodies to mistakenly attack neurons.The study gives little hope to children already affected, Nath says. Although antiseizure drugs can help, if the immune system has attacked neurons, the damage is likely permanent. However, the work could suggest a straightforward way to eliminate the disease, says infectious disease specialist Robert Colebunders of the University of Antwerp in Belgium, because the drug ivermectin kills the worm. Existing campaigns to eliminate river blindness by giving the drug could have a collateral benefit: After the Ugandan government stepped up ivermectin treatment, new cases of nodding syndrome plunged to nearly zero, Colebunders says. “If you eliminate the onchocerciasis, the epilepsy really disappears.”Yet the link between the worm and nodding syndrome doesn’t explain why the illness suddenly appeared in a region where onchocerciasis has likely been common for centuries, or why nodding syndrome only affects children and youth. Johnson, now at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, says malnutrition, exposure to other diseases, or genetic variation in how the body makes antibodies may also play a role. Other researchers have suggested that measles infection followed by malnutrition could trigger the disease.Neurologist Erich Schmutzhard of the Medical University of Innsbruck in Austria has other doubts. He says that the leiomodin-1 antibodies could be a result of epilepsy, not its cause. The protein seems to be on the inside of neurons, not the outside, he notes. Seizures kill neurons, and he speculates that dying neurons could spill the protein into the blood stream, triggering the antibodies.The onchocerciasis connection is intriguing but far from definitive, says neurologist Andrea Winkler of the Technical University of Munich in Germany. She, too, thinks the syndrome is likely caused by multiple factors, such as malnutrition, parasites, and viruses like measles. “There are still lots of links missing.”last_img read more

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Curtis Circulation Co Pressmart Media Launch Digital Mag Service

first_imgNational magazine distributor Curtis Circulation Company and Pressmart, a new media delivery partner for newspapers and magazines, announced that the two have partnered to launch a new digital sales, distribution and marketing service for magazine publishers. Dubbed “iMags,” the service will target the small to mid-size publisher—a large part of Curtis’ portfolio—that may not be able to afford to buy digital magazine services from larger companies like Zinio and Texterity, according to Rick Wetzel, vice president of strategic planning and administration for Curtis Circulation. “Some of the smaller publishers might not be able to do it cost effectively on their own,” Wetzel told The Circulator. “By consolidating, we create tremendous amount of value for Pressmart, which allows them to provide not only a service that publishers can afford, but that is geared towards their needs.”Wetzel added that iMags will provide many of the same features that larger suppliers offer, such as various channels of deliverability (including mobile devices), access to social networks, blogs, and RSS feeds, and interactive advertising. “We wanted to provide as total circulation package our publishers because it helps the viability of their business,” Wetzel said. “We also see the fact that advertising dollars are moving away from print and into Web-based revenue streams. We want our publishers to have a platform so that they can take advantage of that shift in ad dollars.”Curtis and Pressmart will be offering the iMags service to publishers within the next few weeks.last_img read more

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35kg gold seized at Chattogram airport

first_imggold. File PhotoCustoms officials on Wednesday seized 32 gold bars weighing around 3.5 kilograms from a flight of Biman Bangladesh Airlines at Shah Amanat International Airport in Chattogram.A team of customs officials recovered the gold bars from an abandoned bag found in the flight came from Dubai around 11:00am, airport manager Sarwar-e-Jahan said.The flight was flying to Dhaka via Chattogram, he added.However, none was arrested in this connection, reports UNB.last_img

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The Murder of Lor Scoota Leaves City Reeling

first_imgSean YoesA vigil for 23-year old Tyriece Watson, the Baltimore rapper known as, “Lor Scoota,” on June 27 ended with a smoldering standoff between those mourning the young burgeoning hip hop artist and Baltimore City police, at Penn and North, one of the flashpoints of last April’s uprising. Some hurled bricks and bottles at police, three people were arrested, many appealed for peace.But, the murder of Scoota, gunned down in his car while traveling east on Moravia Road at the intersection of Harford Road, after leaving a peace rally at Morgan State University, has rattled many in the city’s poorest communities to their cores.“It’s definitely heartbreaking especially to the Baltimore hip hop community,” said independent hip hop artist and educator Eze Jackson. “I’ve taught hip hop in classes for a number of years…teaching young people how to write their own songs and song structure and one of the first things I always ask them is, `Who are your favorite rappers?’ A few years ago, I started to hear for the first time ever an overwhelming amount of students say that two Baltimore rappers were their favorites and that was Young Moose and Lor Scoota,” Jackson added.“So, the symbolism to me is not just a heavy blow to the hip hop community, but to our whole community. Here you have a young artist who, regardless of his content, was actually doing something positive that affected young people. They looked up to him, they saw him as somebody that came from their neighborhood who was now being able to do things that statistically they’re not supposed to be able to do.”In the aftermath of last April’s uprising, Baltimore City Councilman Nick Mosby, who represents the Seventh District where it unfolded, first crossed paths with Scoota.“I had the opportunity to partner with Lor Scoota at an event after the unrest, when we went around to West Baltimore high schools with local artists and talent to give a positive message to the students.  Right away, out of everybody that we interfaced with, on the stage Lor Scoota stood out,” Mosby said.“He was focused, he was driven, he was definitely a product of Baltimore, but he knew exactly where he wanted to go and how he wanted to benefit not only himself, but his family, his community and the city of Baltimore as a whole…it’s definitely a tragedy and a loss for the entire city,” Mosby added.Ras Tahuti Missouri, a 15-year old spoken word artist from West Baltimore, knew Scoota and says he was inspired by his personal example, which transcended the  the gritty lyrics of, “Bird Flu,” Scoota’s hit song chronicling Baltimore’s drug culture.“He rapped about his reality…you have to look at the artist… but, you have to look at the person. He went to the schools, feeding the homeless, donating thousands of dollars worth of shoes to children, linking up at peace rallies and he was murdered after a peace rally,” observed Missouri, whose mother recently pulled him out of Baltimore’s public schools fearing her son was being imperiled by the violence that took the life of the up and coming rap artist.Lor Scoota was one of the few shining symbols of hope for some of the city’s most disenfranchised communities. Many of the young people who rumbled through the streets of West Baltimore last April during the uprising, bumped Scoota’s music incessantly and were buoyed by the reality that he still lived among them, evidence of the promise of brighter days.  His talent cut a path for him away from the city and the violence that ultimately snuffed out his promising young life. Now, that path seems dimmer again.“He was trying to get away from the street life, he was trying to get away from all of that,” Missouri said.  “That was his ticket out of the city…rapping about what he lived… and it’s sad that the reality and what he lived turned around to be his downfall.”Sean Yoes is a senior contributor for the AFRO and host and executive producer of First Edition, which airs Monday through Friday, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. on WEAA 88.9.last_img
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CRIME attack is shown to decrypt HTTPS web sessions

first_img Security researchers Juliano Rizzo and Thai Duong devised a technique that can attack web sessions that are protected by the Secure Sockets Layer and Transport Layer Security protocols, only when they use certain data-compression schemes. These are compression schemes that reduce network congestion or the time it takes for webpages to load. Security experts have noted that a downside of compression is that it leaks clues about encrypted contents. For the attack to work, a computer user’s client and server hosting the targeted website need to support the vulnerable SSL/TLS features. According to reports, Internet Explorer was never vulnerable because it never supported SPDY or the TLS compression scheme known as Deflate. Apple’s Safari browser doesn’t support SPDY, but its use of compression is unknown.Google and Mozilla released patches after the weaknesses were reported by the researchers. A video taken by Rizzo and Duong shows Github.com, Dropbox.com, and Stripe.com, when visited with Chrome, succumbing to the CRIME attack, but those sites had disabled compression and are no longer vulnerable. Mozilla and Google have prepared patches that block the attack. More information: www.ekoparty.org/2012/juliano-rizzo.php This is a short demo of the CRIME attack against TLS protocol. Rizzo and Duong will take their demo of CRIME to the Buenos Aires, Argentina, security conference, Ekoparty, on September 21. Their attack technique no longer works on the most popular browsers to connect to HTTPS-protected websites, but security watchers believe this is a most useful reminder that the science of encrypton protection knows no rest. Their CRIME exploit is the type of attack that would be a large-scale attack by geopolitical antagonists. In turn, security watchers reasons are paying attention to the researchers’ CRIME technique. Citation: CRIME attack is shown to decrypt HTTPS web sessions (2012, September 14) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-09-crime-shown-decrypt-https-web.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. © 2012 Phys.org Hackers target British anti-crime agency website Explore further (Phys.org)—The fun of acronyms is reflected in coming up with CRIME, which stands for Compression Ratio Info-leak Made Easy. What it translates into, though, is not much fun. Two security researchers have developed the CRIME attack that can successfully decrypt session cookies from HTTPS (Hypertext Transfer Protocol Secure) connections. This, in theory, would be a serious weakness that would enable the hijacking of a user’s session cookie while the user is still authenticated to a website. Encryption protocols are the Internet’s fundamental safety cushion, the basic level of trust, in encrypting traffic that flows over open networks. They cryptographically confirm websites are really operated by those sites rather than cyber-criminals and spies. last_img read more

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