Heyneke Meyer named Springbok coach

first_imgMeyer said he wanted to be a Springbok coach “for the people and all South Africans out there, and I want to make myself accessible to all people. ‘Unanimous choice’ “It’s a huge, huge honour,” Meyer told the press conference in Cape Town following the announcement of his appointment. His contract with the South African Rugby Union (Saru) is for four years. “I want all our supporters to be proud of the Springbok team, the Springbok jersey, and what it stands for, because, for me, this is very important, and this is the country that I love. “I truly want to unite our country through the team, but I can’t do this alone. I need every single South African citizen to help me to make this the best team in the world.” 27 January 2012 “The Springboks are Saru’s top priority,” Hoskins said. “Heyneke’s coaching pedigree is second to none in South Africa. He will be an asset to the Boks and South African rugby in general. “I realise that winning is the most important thing … but I’ve always coached to make a difference to the people of our country, and I truly believe that I can make a difference.” He then returned to the Blue Bulls in an executive role, but has been released from his position to allow him to take up the reins as Springbok coach. Meyer was a leading candidate to replace Jake White after the Rugby World Cup in 2007, but the job was went instead to Peter de Villiers. After a short stint as head coach of the Leicester Tigers in 2008, Meyer returned home on compassionate leave and then resigned from the English club.center_img “I’ve always coached to make a difference to the people of our country,” Heyneke Meyer said on his appointment as the new Springbok coach on Friday, calling on the people of South Africa to get behind their rugby team. A coach ‘for the people of South Africa’ Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo material Saru president Oregan Hoskins said the choice of Meyer as coach had been unanimous from the general and executive councils of Saru. Meyer has previous experience with the Springboks, having served as an assistant coach to both Nick Mallett and Harry Viljoen. “I truly realise that it’s a huge responsibility, because you carry the hopes and dreams of the whole of South Africa on your shoulders, but I am ready and I am looking forward to the challenge,” Meyer said. Run of success with the Bulls “Heyneke has our full support, and we know he won’t leave any stone unturned as he strives to take the Boks back to the top of international rugby.” At the time, Meyer was coming off a run, from 2002 to 2006, as coach of the Blue Bulls that included three Currie Cup titles in succession and a shared title with the Free State Cheetahs. In 2007, he led the Vodacom Bulls to the first ever Super 14 title won by a South African team.last_img read more

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What Does Access to Real World Data Online Make Possible? Check Out PolicyMap 2.0

first_imgTags:#Mashups#web Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… marshall kirkpatrick A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Related Posts center_img Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Databases. They’re not just for those with specialized skills anymore. Want to know what kinds of insights into the world everyday people can find when the right tools are available to process plenty of data? Check out this example below.One year ago we wrote about a fascinating service called PolicyMap, a website where users can view more than 4000 different data sets laid out on a map down to the city street level. I found which parts of my neighborhood donated more money to John McCain than to Barack Obama, and vice versa. Today PolicyMap launched a new feature for subscribers that allows up to three points of data to be cross-referenced. You may or may not be interested in subscribing to PolicyMap, but anyone can see from the screencast below just how much potential technologies like this have.There’s a button to view this video full screen in the bottom-right corner of the player.This is pretty interesting stuff, is it not? The ability to cross-reference different sets of data with factors like geographic location is really exciting. Extrapolate from this, if you will, by imagining what kind of things could be made possible if programmatic access to data from Facebook could be layered into systems like this. Or any other large data set that’s hording it. Anonymous aggregate data made available to developers who can build interfaces that allow end users to analyze that data is likely to be an even more important resource in the near future than it is today. 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

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The maker movement – how an Internet of Things device could shape a child’s future

first_imgIn recent years, there has been a shortage of school leavers with the skills universities need for a career in computer science. The Confederation of British Industry stated that a quarter of firms who needed STEM qualified staff were having trouble recruiting.Reports like the Government commissioned Next Gen report stated that this is due to an education system that didn’t understand industry needs. And so in 2012, the Education Secretary scrapped the existing ICT curriculum for new courses of study in computer science.In 2016, school children in the UK will receive a device called the micro:bit for free. The BBC has already been working closely with hundreds of schools, so you may already know something about it.The goal of the campaign is to inspire digital creativity in children. The micro:bit is a gadget aimed specifically at absolute beginners, teaching them software and hardware basics, but with interesting features such as LED lights, a compass and accelerometer.We’re already making a differenceWhy is the micro:bit gaining attention? The popularity of games like Minecraft and the increasing popularity of hacker spaces shows that there is still an in-built human urge to make things. The resurgence of our personal ability to do this is called the maker movement.Intel has been working in this area for a few years. We know kids love getting hands-on in building stuff and naturally gravitate to it – think Lego. With our Galileo programmable electronics board, we’re getting students working on The Internet of Things (IoT) projects to develop their skills in electronics and coding.More powerful than the micro:bit, the Galileo is aimed at students who’ve developed an interest in making stuff and want to know more. Year 10 and 12 Students from the Writhlington School near Bath have worked with Intel in using Galileo in capturing and analysing live web stream data.And if they want something with even more potential for experimentation, students can also use the Edison development platform – a more powerful board which can be used for more complex projects.The maker movement helps, as it encourages children to hack, build and make stuff. And with the availability of devices like the Galileo, Edison, micro:bit and Raspberry Pi, learning to code in a fun way has never been easier.Why STEM and the Internet of Things matterThis is all feeding into an ‘Internet of Things’, understanding how things like watches, cars and buildings are getting smart through the connected world.This stuff can change the world. Kids can get inspired and passionate about STEM subjects which will turn them into the innovators of the future. This starts with you – the teachers.So are you prepared? Are you getting the help you need to handle IoT devices like the micro:bit and Galileo? Let us know.Keep up-to-date with the Intel Education newsletter for the latest updates on education technology and innovation, and check us out on Twitter and Facebook.last_img read more

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Mystery nodding syndrome may be triggered by parasitic worm

first_imgA boy receives ivermectin to prevent river blindness. Some think the drug may also prevent nodding syndrome. By Gretchen VogelFeb. 15, 2017 , 2:00 PM ISSOUF SANOGO/Staff/Getty Images Mystery nodding syndrome may be triggered by parasitic worm Between 1990 and 2013, thousands of children in war-torn South Sudan and northern Uganda suddenly developed a severe and puzzling form of epilepsy. When exposed to food or cold temperatures, affected children nodded their heads uncontrollably. Over time the seizures often worsened, leaving the children severely disabled. Many died of malnutrition, accidents, or secondary infections.In some communities, roughly half of families had at least one child with the condition, called nodding syndrome; by 2013, an estimated 1600 children in Uganda were affected. But the cause of the devastation was a mystery. Now, a study finds that a parasitic worm often found in the children might trigger the body’s own defenses to attack neurons.The study doesn’t prove the worm is the culprit, but it “is the first to show that a cause-effect relationship is plausible,” says Hermann Feldmeier, a parasitologist at the Charité University Hospital in Berlin, who was not involved in the study.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The rash of cases in Uganda and South Sudan triggered an intense hunt for the cause, but searches for viruses, bacteria, environmental toxins, genetic factors, and nutritional deficits all came up empty. One key clue: Areas with nodding syndrome also had high rates of onchocerciasis, an infection with the parasitic worm Onchocerca volvulus. Spread through the bites of black flies, which breed in swift-flowing streams, the worms can invade the eye, and the infection is commonly known as river blindness. The World Health Organization estimates that at least 18 million people, most in sub-Saharan Africa, are infected.Researchers had suggested as early as the 1960s that high rates of epilepsy in Tanzania, with similar nodding symptoms, might be related to onchocerciasis. Others have noted that children with nodding syndrome are more likely to be infected than their healthy peers. But there’s no evidence that the worm invades the brain or directly causes seizures.Some researchers suggested that the worm instead causes an autoimmune reaction that damages the nervous system. Searches for antibodies that might play an autoimmune role had come up empty. But neuroimmunologists Avindra Nath and Tory Johnson of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, decided to use an improved protein chip to screen for antibodies to thousands of proteins at once.The new tool proved its worth. Blood from nodding syndrome patients reacted strongly to four proteins; in the case of one protein, called leiomodin-1, patient sera reacted 33,000 times more strongly than did sera from unaffected controls. The researchers then looked for the antibodies causing the reaction. As they report this week in Science Translational Medicine, antibodies to leiomodin-1 turned up in 29 of 55 nodding syndrome patients but only 17 of 55 controls. Patients also carried much higher antibody levels than controls.Leiomodin-1, which likely plays a role in cell shape, is found in smooth muscle and thyroid cells. Johnson’s team showed that it is expressed in the nervous system and brain, too. They also found a clue to what might trigger an autoimmune reaction to the protein: Several O. volvulus proteins resemble it. After the immune system gears up to fight the worm, similarities between an O. volvulus protein and leiomodin-1 may cause the antibodies to mistakenly attack neurons.The study gives little hope to children already affected, Nath says. Although antiseizure drugs can help, if the immune system has attacked neurons, the damage is likely permanent. However, the work could suggest a straightforward way to eliminate the disease, says infectious disease specialist Robert Colebunders of the University of Antwerp in Belgium, because the drug ivermectin kills the worm. Existing campaigns to eliminate river blindness by giving the drug could have a collateral benefit: After the Ugandan government stepped up ivermectin treatment, new cases of nodding syndrome plunged to nearly zero, Colebunders says. “If you eliminate the onchocerciasis, the epilepsy really disappears.”Yet the link between the worm and nodding syndrome doesn’t explain why the illness suddenly appeared in a region where onchocerciasis has likely been common for centuries, or why nodding syndrome only affects children and youth. Johnson, now at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, says malnutrition, exposure to other diseases, or genetic variation in how the body makes antibodies may also play a role. Other researchers have suggested that measles infection followed by malnutrition could trigger the disease.Neurologist Erich Schmutzhard of the Medical University of Innsbruck in Austria has other doubts. He says that the leiomodin-1 antibodies could be a result of epilepsy, not its cause. The protein seems to be on the inside of neurons, not the outside, he notes. Seizures kill neurons, and he speculates that dying neurons could spill the protein into the blood stream, triggering the antibodies.The onchocerciasis connection is intriguing but far from definitive, says neurologist Andrea Winkler of the Technical University of Munich in Germany. She, too, thinks the syndrome is likely caused by multiple factors, such as malnutrition, parasites, and viruses like measles. “There are still lots of links missing.”last_img read more

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Making Sense Of An NCAA Tournament Bracket That Makes No Sense

9Cincinnati84.486.382.8—83.7-13.20.3 16F. Dickinson66.269.364.0—66.7—0.00.0 16Austin Peay68.771.566.1—68.8—0.00.0 5Purdue89.590.688.4—88.6-212.82.6 COMPUTER RATINGS 2Villanova92.295.288.6-0.391.3—22.46.4 5Maryland86.588.285.3—87.4-16.31.3 The strongest region in this year’s tournament boasts what our power ratings consider the nation’s No. 1 and No. 5 teams — Kansas and Villanova — at its top. But it also contains a whole host of underseeded squads down the seed line, which will probably make for some real carnage in the early rounds. For instance, “first four” opponents Wichita State and Vanderbilt, both vying for the right to be a lowly 11-seed, would have been seeded five or six slots higher if the committee’s S-curve had followed our ratings. (Instead, one will be eliminated before the tourney even begins in earnest.) Our model also says that Maryland, Iowa and UConn deserved better seeds and that sixth-seeded Arizona had a case to be moved all the way up to No. 3 on the basis of its talent, now that Kaleb Tarczewski and Allonzo Trier are back at full strength. (Instead, the Wildcats will be mild favorites at best in the first round against either the Shockers or the Commodores.)As a byproduct of all this wacky seeding, the South will have claimed at least eight of the nation’s 26 highest-rated teams as victims by the middle of the second weekend, after beginning the tournament with 10. But amid this havoc is also opportunity: Regardless of the Vandy-Wichita victor, seven teams in the region will have at least a 29 percent shot at the Sweet 16 before the round of 64 starts Thursday. With so many solid teams stuffed into such close proximity within the bracket, chalk in the first few rounds would be surprising.But for all the South’s potential turmoil, Kansas still has the best Final Four probability of any team in the tournament. UConn is a trendy dark horse for those thinking that 2011 will repeat itself, and it’s possible that Villanova will stand in KU’s way. But our ratings consider the Jayhawks the nation’s top team, and they may be the only No. 1 team this season that played like it deserved the mantle after re-assuming it late in the season. 3Miami (FL)87.989.686.3—87.1+14.91.0 4Iowa State86.889.184.6-0.886.5+26.41.0 4Duke87.990.486.0-1.187.3—12.11.7 11Northern Iowa79.781.578.3—80.2—0.80.0 SEEDTEAMAVGHIGHLOWINJURY538 RATING+/- SEEDFINAL 4CHAMPS 9Connecticut85.786.684.7—85.4-22.10.3 More: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS | Embed 9Providence82.684.281.6—82.5—0.80.1 12SD State78.880.974.4—78.6—0.20.0 14Green Bay75.778.474.1—76.2—0.10.0 14Fresno St.77.680.076.0—76.6—0.00.0 Our sports podcast Hot Takedown previews March Madness. 13Hawaii80.081.076.9-1.278.0—0.00.0 4California86.287.885.3—86.5+14.00.7 1Oregon89.091.987.5-0.288.0+222.62.6 PROBABILITY OF… 16Holy Cross66.069.463.6—66.9—0.00.0 10Pittsburgh83.184.982.2-0.182.3—1.20.1 7Iowa86.887.984.8-0.285.9-13.20.6 8Colorado81.983.781.2—81.5+20.40.0 14Buffalo74.976.573.3—75.7—0.00.0 15UNC Asheville74.976.772.2—74.2—0.00.0 9Butler84.085.783.0—84.2-12.50.3 1Virginia92.594.890.9—92.5—30.39.8 12Little Rock80.483.074.7—79.0—0.20.0 16Hampton67.971.965.6—68.6—0.00.0 5Indiana88.389.387.4-0.687.4-15.71.1 The East is the second-best region in the tournament, not far behind the South. Although our model thinks No. 2 Xavier was slightly overseeded, the East has the second-best No. 1 seed (with UNC fairly close on Kansas’s heels), the best No. 3 seed (West Virginia) and the best No. 4 seed of any region (Kentucky). There’s a reason we give the top four seeds here such an overpowering likelihood of making the Final Four.The East figures to be a relatively chalky region, particularly in the early going. Aside from ninth-seeded Providence, a 62 percent favorite to oust Southern Cal, tantalizing first-round upset picks are hard to come by. The closest are Pitt over Wisconsin and the Michigan/Tulsa winner over Notre Dame, but each of those are less than 40 percent likely to happen. Our model might be missing how well a few of the underdogs match up against the favorites, but this region just doesn’t seem like it’s going to provide a lot of teary-eyed upset footage for this year’s “One Shining Moment” montage.However, there are two potential confrontations further down the line that everyone’s already circled on their brackets: Kentucky-Indiana in the round of 32 and its winner vs. North Carolina in the Sweet 16. If each happens, you might not see a better pair of matchups at that stage of the tournament; our model says UNC is a deserving No. 1, Kentucky is basically a two-seed that got dropped to a No. 4 and Indiana deserved a No. 4 seed instead of a No. 5. The combination of history and talent in each game would be tremendous — but before we get too excited, our simulations say there’s a 26 percent chance that at least one of the teams will lose before the matchups can come together.North Carolina’s a pretty good bet to hold up its end of the bargain, though. The Tar Heels rank second in our power ratings and have the second-best Final Four probability of any team, trailing Kansas by a single percentage point. KU and UNC’s odds would diverge slightly after that — to make the title game, Carolina would have to go through the presumably tougher Midwest champ — but a North Carolina-Kansas showdown is the most likely final according to our method. As far as top two seeds go, it’s hard to get better than the Midwest’s combo of Virginia and Michigan State. According to our power ratings, they’re the nation’s third- and fourth-best teams, squeezed into the same region only because, well, nobody’s really sure why.And yet, their collision course is not the most certain of any top two seeds, according to our model. (Kansas and Villanova, the top-seeded teams in the South region, are more likely to meet in the Elite Eight.) Why? Because the Midwest also has its share of spoilers situated elsewhere in the bracket. In addition to solid Utah and Iowa State teams as the third and fourth seeds, our ratings say Purdue is a No. 3 seed masquerading as a No. 5 and Gonzaga is a No. 6 in a No. 11’s clothing.In fact, Purdue could be an interesting dark horse Final Four pick. Our simulations say they have a 13 percent shot at it, easily the best chance of any team seeded fifth or lower in its region. And for Gonzaga, an underdog run could be like old times again. The FiveThirtyEight model says the Zags have a 60 percent probability of pulling a first-round “upset” over Big East champ Seton Hall and a break-even shot against whichever team they’d end up facing the round after that (Utah, most likely).But in spite of all the ways in which it could be thwarted, an MSU-UVA regional final matchup is still the most likely way that the Midwest will reach its crescendo. If it happens, Virginia will be slightly favored according to our power ratings, though we’ve learned over the years to never discount a Tom Izzo-coached team.And in a year as wide open as this, why not Michigan State? Or Virginia, or Oklahoma, Villanova and West Virginia? Or the basketball blue blood in Kansas, North Carolina and Kentucky? With so much uncertainty, sometimes the best forecast is to pick out the handful of most likely winners and see what happens from there. Compared with the seeming imbalance of last year, this season’s parity might make for a more exciting tournament anyway.Check out FiveThirtyEight’s 2016 March Madness Predictions. 4Kentucky90.391.189.9—90.7-216.04.5 7Oregon State80.681.778.9-2.877.6+60.20.0 2Mich. St.93.293.992.5-0.591.9-134.2%9.0% 15CS Bakersfield75.978.472.4—75.0—0.10.0 PROBABILITY OF… 11Vanderbilt85.987.985.0—85.6-52.40.5 PROBABILITY OF… In the Final Four, the winner of the South — this year’s strongest region — will face the winner of the West — the weakest region. Our model says top-seed Oregon was tied for the third-most overseeded team of any in the field and is by far the worst of the No. 1s. Second-seeded Oklahoma is rated a bit higher than the Ducks in our numbers, with Texas A&M and Duke in close pursuit. Each of the top four seeds has at least a 12 percent probability of reaching the Final Four.At a minimum, the West might prove a favorite region for fans of first-round upsets. Our model gives 10th-seeded VCU a 73 percent probability of “knocking off” No. 7 Oregon State — the best odds it assigns to any lower-seeded team in the round of 64. (Oregon State is the most overseeded team in the field; based on their rating, the Beavers deserved a No. 13 seed.) It also thinks No. 9 Cincinnati has a 60 percent probability of beating eighth-seeded Saint Joe’s and No. 11 Northern Iowa has a 30 percent chance against Texas. And if, like us, you’re a fan of 12-over-5 upsets, it assigns Yale a healthy 39 percent chance of toppling Baylor.Those Cinderellas may not have much of a chance after pulling their initial upset(s), though, because there’s a good amount of separation between the top four seeds and the rest of the field, and making the Sweet 16 will require beating one of those top four teams. After the East, where the top four seeds combine for an 86 percent chance of making the Final Four, the West is the most likely region to have a top-four seed represent it in Houston (79 percent). But, let’s face it, we don’t know which of those top-four seeds it will be — no region has a smaller spread in Final Four odds among its top four seeds than the West. 13Iona78.781.876.8-0.078.2-10.10.0 10Temple78.780.777.3-0.778.5+20.20.0 SEEDTEAMAVGHIGHLOWINJURY538 RATING+/- SEEDFINAL 4CHAMPS 1N. Carolina93.396.192.0—93.9—43.6%14.9% 10Syracuse83.184.382.3—82.7-11.30.1 8Tex. Tech82.183.580.4—81.3+30.40.0 2Xavier88.290.086.5—87.7+19.81.8 15MTSU75.377.474.0—75.0—0.00.0 PROBABILITY OF… 6Arizona88.890.187.7+0.789.0-36.01.8 12Yale81.683.178.7-0.680.2-11.00.0 6Seton Hall85.687.584.3—84.5+21.80.2 3Utah85.686.584.3+0.486.6+25.30.8 11Michigan82.284.480.9-2.579.6—0.30.0 5Baylor85.386.484.1—85.5+26.11.0 Team ratings: West 14S.F. Austin82.084.378.8—81.0-30.40.0 11Tulsa80.281.978.9-0.079.9—0.20.0 16Southern67.771.762.3—68.0—0.00.0 7Dayton82.484.181.2—82.4+21.60.1 COMPUTER RATINGS 16Florida G.C.71.373.968.2—71.4—0.00.0 COMPUTER RATINGS COMPUTER RATINGS 7Wisconsin84.386.882.5—84.8—2.90.4 11Wichita St.86.988.386.1+0.086.6-62.70.7 SEEDTEAMAVGHIGHLOWINJURY538 RATING+/- SEEDFINAL 4CHAMPS 11Gonzaga86.487.685.4-0.386.0-53.20.5 Team ratings: Midwest 15Weber State74.076.868.7—73.3—0.00.0 A year ago, it seemed like the NCAA Tournament’s era of parity was under attack. Kentucky had just wrapped up an undefeated regular season and was looking so powerful that the FiveThirtyEight model assigned the Wildcats a 41 percent probability of winning the tourney before it even began. (By comparison, most pre-tournament favorites of recent vintage sported odds roughly twice as long.) It was enough to make some wonder whether superteams like the Wildcats had sucked the equality right out of the sport.Of course, Kentucky’s unbeaten run eventually ended, and its dominance to that point had concealed the overall balance of the field, anyway. Then came this upset-crazy season, with an abnormally mediocre set of top teams and no clear favorite to win it all. Kansas, our most likely champ this year, caught fire down the home stretch, aided in part by a newfound reliance on the 3-pointer, but the Jayhawks still have only a 19 percent shot at the title. Parity has officially delivered its counterpunch.Our latest model does, however, think there’s around a 3 in 4 chance that this year’s champ will emerge from these eight schools: Kansas, North Carolina, Virginia, Michigan State, Oklahoma, Villanova, Kentucky and West Virginia. Our power ratings also think those are the nation’s top eight teams — though they’re not all distributed evenly throughout the bracket. Let’s take a look at how the committee placed them (and the other 60 tournament-bound teams) in this year’s field. 6Texas83.984.982.7+0.784.7+15.90.9 3Texas A&M88.089.386.7-0.186.8+212.32.3 SEEDTEAMAVGHIGHLOWINJURY538 RATING+/- SEEDFINAL 4CHAMPS Embed Code 1Kansas94.298.292.4—94.5—45.0%19.1% Team ratings: East 12Chattanooga76.678.872.8—76.6+20.00.0 2Oklahoma89.891.886.7—90.0—32.1%6.8% 10VCU84.085.983.2-0.682.9-12.10.2 Team ratings: South 3W. Virginia90.291.788.0—89.3-116.13.4 13UNC-Wilmington78.580.475.4—77.7—0.20.0 8Saint Joseph’s83.084.182.1—81.7+21.20.1 6Notre Dame83.885.082.8—84.4+22.60.3 By Neil Paine 8USC82.483.780.9—81.4+20.20.0 13Stony Brook78.079.375.4-0.477.1—0.10.0 read more

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Ohio State field hockey ends 3game losing streak with 21 victory against

Senior midfielder Mona Frommhold (8) stands over her goalkeeper during a match against Louisville Oct. 1 at Buckeye Varsity Field. OSU lost, 6-3.Credit: Ritikia Shah / Asst. photo editorThe Ohio State field hockey team ended its three game losing streak Wednesday, defeating Ball Ball State, 2-1.The Buckeyes hadn’t won a match since beating Ohio University Oct. 6.The teams did not score in the first half Wednesday.Sophomore back Emma Royce notched her first goal of 2013 when she hit the back of the cage during the 55th minute. Five minutes later, Ball State tied the game when freshman Lexi Kavanaugh got past the Buckeye defense.OSU was able to bounce back quickly, though, when senior midfielder Mona Frommhold brought the team ahead in the 65th minute and secured the fifth win of the season for the Buckeyes.It was Frommhold’s fifth goal of the season for OSU.“We had a slow start during the first half I think,” Coach Anne Wilkinson said. “(OSU) really stepped up and played well during the second half.”She said she moved some of her players around, like senior midfielder Nora Murer shifting to forward, to create a different look on the field hoping to confuse the Cardinals.“We wanted to create more space and move people around,” Wilkinson said. “Mona (Frommhold) and Nina (Laudahn) created good plays and bumped off each other well. We were able to find space and create scoring opportunities.”Wilkinson said overall it was a “good win.”The Buckeyes are set to return to Columbus to face Indiana Saturday at 1 p.m. with the hopes of building off the victory and securing their first Big Ten win. read more

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Ohio States Aaron Craft I loved my time here

Senior guard Aaron Craft (4) carries the ball down the court in a game against Dayton. OSU lost, 60-59, at First Niagara Center March 20. Credit: Ritika Shah / Asst. photo editorBUFFALO, N.Y. — As he entered the First Niagara Center locker room, Aaron Craft paused, hunched over a water cooler and tried to collect himself before greeting the media for the last time after a game as an Ohio State Buckeye.Turning to answer questions, Craft made it clear — as with every other game in his career — he did all he could to leave it on the floor.“I tried to,” Craft said. “I tried to.”For the senior guard from Findlay, Ohio — a three-year starter, two-time Big Ten Defensive Player of the Year and three-time Academic All-American — his career was finished in the blink of an eye.“I loved my time here,” Craft said. “Wouldn’t trade it for anything and obviously this year has been unbelievably up and down and different than any other year that we’ve had. It’s made me a better player and it’s made me a better person.”Twenty minutes before joining his teammates in the locker room for the last time, Craft had a chance to repeat his magic — and win the game for the Buckeyes.As time expired, he watched his layup float from his hand, to the backboard, to the front of the rim and, ultimately, out of the basket, ending his tournament, his season and his career.“(I) just tried to get up the floor as quickly as possible,” Craft said in the postgame press conference. “There’s only four seconds left. That’s kind of how our season’s gone. Thought I got it up there high enough, and I obviously didn’t.”The 60-59 loss in the second round against Dayton Thursday wasn’t the first close game in the NCAA Tournament Craft had played in his time at OSU. All four of his career NCAA Tournament losses were by less than five points, something Craft said is what hurts the most.“Lost by nine points total in my four NCAA Tournament losses,” Craft said. “Two points, two points, four points and now one point. So those are all one-possession, two-possession games, and that’s the most frustrating part.”When coach Thad Matta joined his players in the locker room, he didn’t require the same time to gather himself, but was still left at a loss for words to describe Craft’s career.“I honestly don’t know. I can never put into words what he’s meant to my life, to my program, to Ohio State. I think without a doubt, he’s going to go down as one of the greatest players to ever wear the Scarlet and Gray. It’s unfortunate that it ends this way, it’s unfortunate for him that he’s not going to a fourth-straight Sweet Sixteen,” Matta said.But unlike his coach, Craft said it wasn’t the end of a career that hurt the most — but the ending of one last game.“To be honest, I’m more upset we lost the game,” Craft said. “I’m not upset that I don’t get to play for Ohio State again. I’m upset with the way we lost the game. Angry at myself for letting (Dayton redshirt-senior guard Vee Sanford) get a shot over me to his right hand. I’m upset at myself for not making one more play down the stretch. That’s what I’m upset about because that’s what hurts right now.”Matta added, though, that were it not for Craft’s ability and tenacity in his career, the Buckeyes would never have achieved such heights.“I thought he was great,” Matta said. “Just from the standpoint of, we wouldn’t have been in this position had he not been doing the things that he had done to get us here. You look at his career, in my mind, in the 10 years I’ve been at Ohio State, he’s going down as one of the all-time greatest players … Obviously, you don’t like this season to end the way it ends, but just that kid has probably meant more to this program than anybody’s ever meant to this program.”Craft will go down as one of the most successful Buckeyes in program history, finishing his career as the school’s all-time leader in assists and the conference’s leader in steals.He was, along with fellow senior guard Lenzelle Smith Jr., also the fastest player in OSU history to reach the milestone of 100 wins.Matta said Craft’s ability to affect a game, in particular on defense, was something that will be remembered for a long time.“He had such an ability over the course of his four years to change the tide of a basketball game,” Matta said. “I think from that perspective, we’ll have to look all (next) season at changing some things, especially on the defensive end … He won 119 games in his career, just short of 30 a year, and so many of those games he won just by being on the defensive end of it.”But it wasn’t just his on-the-court play where Craft’s influence spread, with both his now-fiancee and roommates becoming minor celebrities in Columbus.With his career done, though, Craft couldn’t say how it was he wished to be remembered at OSU, adding it was up to others to decide.“I have zero thoughts on that right now,” Craft said. “I’m upset at the way that we played this game and the way that we didn’t take the opportunity and make the most of it.“So that’s for you guys to decide and discuss, but right now, I can’t move past this game yet.”He did say though, he hoped what he’s done in his four years with the Buckeyes has left an impact on the program and the school.“I’ve been given a phenomenal platform and stage since I’ve been here. The worst thing that I’ve tried to avoid is taking that for granted,” Craft said. “Whether that’s diving on the floor or doing whatever I have to do … it amazes me. There’s so many people that go out there that just love to watch the game and to be able to hear and listen to them talk about they like the way I play, I mean that’s … that’s bigger than me being done. Hopefully that … my short time here has made a difference somewhere.”But unlike the player himself, there was zero doubt in Matta’s mind about the legacy of Aaron Craft.“As time marches on, I think that without a doubt, I know this from my perspective, he’s as special as they come.” read more

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Dyche talks before the BurnleyOlympiakos match

first_imgThe Clarets coach is not happy about the field in the Karaiskakis Stadium but believes his team can get a win in Greek landFor Burnley coach Sean Dyche his team has history in the UEFA Europa League.Just this season the team has already beat Scottish Premiership club Aberdeen and Turkis Super Lig side Istanbul Basaksehir.And now, they will play against 44-time Greek champions Olympiakos.The field at the Karaiskakis Stadium is not in the best condition, but Dyche has decided to focus on other things.Burnley FC v Manchester City - Premier LeagueMatch Preview: Burnley vs Liverpool Boro Tanchev – August 30, 2019 Premier League leaders Liverpool travel to Burnley for the Matchday 4 of the 2019-20 Premier League campaign.“We’ve had a tough time of it really,” said the Burnley boss to the club’s official website.“There was a lot of noise with the so-called ‘Battle of Britain’ and then Istanbul were very technical.”“This is the prestige of the tournament. Olympiakos have got history here and a deep knowledge of European football and that’s slightly in their favor,” he said.“But we’ve got a freshness to take these challenges on. You want to play teams that challenge you and we take on every game to win and we’ve got that kind of mentality.”“These competitions are to be respected and whatever team we put out tomorrow I expect them to go out and deliver a performance, as we did against the Turkish side,” he added.last_img read more

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Hasenhüttl is proud of Oriol Romeu

first_imgThe current Southampton manager is happy and hopes to end 2018 with a high note as they take on Manchester CitySouthampton FC will host Manchester City tomorrow afternoon in the last match of 2018 in the English Premier League.And for coach Ralph Hasenhüttl, he is proud of managing Oriol Romeu, who has been playing very good lately.“I think he’s absolutely a fighter,” said Hasenhüttl to the club’s official website.Solskjaer slams Man United’s draw: “We should have won” Andrew Smyth – August 31, 2019 Ole Gunnar Solskjaer was left to rue another missed opportunity as Manchester United were held to a 1-1 draw against 10-man Southampton.“He’s a guy who played very well the last two games and I think he deserved to lead this squad on the pitch.”“It wasn’t so easy a game for him, but I know what a fighter I have in his person,” he added.“In terms of his football and mentality he is a good guy, he wins a lot of balls and that is important in my game, so he is an important player for me.”“He is an important player for our team, because he is captain and I think he is a very smart player who knows exactly what we demand of his position, and he showed that he can help us a lot in this position, and I am looking forward to him coming back,” Hasenhüttl concluded.last_img read more

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Salas tribute to take place in European competitions

first_imgA minute’s silence will be observed at all Champions League and Europa League matches this week to pay tribute to Emiliano Sala, according to UEFA.Sala, 28, died on January 21 after the plane he was travelling in from Nantes to Cardiff lost contact with air traffic control and crashed into the English channel. The pilot, David Ibbotson, is still missing.Sala’s body was eventually identified on February 7 after being recovered from the underwater wreckage last week and brought to shore.“On behalf of everyone at UEFA, I would like to express my sincerest condolences to the family and loved ones of Emiliano Sala for their loss,” said UEFA President Aleksander Ceferin.“I am deeply saddened that his life was so cruelly taken away at such a young age and I urge supporters across the continent to pay their respects to his memory over the coming days.”Sergio Ramos, Champions League, Real MadridSergio Ramos would love a fifth Champions League trophy Manuel R. Medina – September 10, 2019 According to Real Madrid captain Sergio Ramos, winning a fifth European trophy with his club would be crazy, but he wants to do it before retiring.As a mark of respect to the life of Emiliano Sala, a minute’s silence will be held at all @ChampionsLeague and @EuropaLeague matches this week.https://t.co/Fc1RgO4TC4— UEFA (@UEFA) February 12, 2019Clubs competing in UEFA competition matches this week will also have the option to wear black armbands in memory of Sala, who was born in Argentina but played a large portion of his professional career in France.last_img read more

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