Crusaders hold on against Blues, Jaguares edge Waratahs

first_imgArgentina’s Jaguares moved four points clear of the Bulls in the South African conference by beating the Waratahs 23-15, dealing a big hit to the Sydney-based team’s hopes of making the playoffs.With two matches remaining, the Crusaders’ 19-11 victory opened up a 13-point lead at the top of the New Zealand table from the Wellington Hurricanes, who have three games left.The Crusaders, who have been under the microscope following allegations of offensive behaviour on their recent South African tour, looked comfortable at 16-6 before a late Rieko Ioane try gave the visitors the chance of an upset.However, a Richie Mo’unga penalty with four minutes remaining sealed the outcome for the defending champions in a match played with a heavy dew which restricted try-scoring opportunities.“It wasn’t pretty at times,” Crusaders skipper Sam Whitelock said.“We had a few challenges coming home from South Africa, a short turnaround, a few of the boys had a lack of sleep this week.”But two All Blacks identified in the off-field accusations levelled at the Crusaders, Mo’unga and George Bridge, appeared unaffected by the attention and played starring roles.After David Havili waltzed through an ineffectual Blues defence to have the Crusaders on attack from the kick-off, the visitors held off repeated raids and it was left to Mo’unga to get the Crusaders on the board with two penalties.The fly-half also featured in the only try of the first half with a well-weighted chip which Ryan Crotty gathered to send Bryn Hall away.The Blues, who prop up the New Zealand conference, responded with a penalty to Harry Plummer for the Crusaders to make the turn with a 13-3 lead.Plummer and Mo’unga then exchanged penalties before Ioane’s try and Mo’unga’s fourth penalty.– Physical game –In Sydney, the well-drilled Jaguares, packed with Test players, came into the game on a run of five wins from six and were simply too good for Michael Hooper’s Waratahs.“It was a physical game. We managed to defend and keep possession and that was where we won the game,” said the Jaguares’ Pablo Matera.“It’s been a great few weeks. We have the Reds to go (on their overseas tour). It’s a really important game.”An intense period of pressure paid off for them in the 25th minute with winger Ramiro Moyano collecting a Jeronimo de la Fuente grubber kick to dot down for a converted try.Bernard Foley pulled three points back but Domingo Miotti cancelled it out with a Jaguares penalty as the visitors took a 10-3 half-time lead.Moyano bagged his second by finishing a counter-attack to put them 17-3 ahead before the Tahs were awarded a penalty try and roared back when Curtis Rona crossed in the corner.But Foley missed the conversion and two late penalties from Joaquin Diaz Bonilla sealed the win.Earlier, Marika Koroibete and Jack Maddocks grabbed two tries apiece in Tokyo for the Rebels, who recorded their highest score in Super Rugby.The bonus-point victory — their seventh of the season — saw them improve to 33 points, one behind the Brumbies, with three regular-season fixtures left.However, after a promising start to the season, they face a difficult run-in, including games against the Crusaders and Chiefs.The Rebels, who dominated the lineout and scrum, went into the break leading 19-0 before running riot in the second half.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000Melbourne Rebels’ Will Genia was knocked out during the Super Rugby match against Japan’s Sunwolves in Tokyo © AFP/File / CHARLY TRIBALLEAUCHRISTCHURCH, New Zealand, May 25 – The table-topping Canterbury Crusaders put a torrid week behind them to hold off the Auckland Blues on Saturday while the red-hot Jaguares shored up their Super Rugby finals hopes with a gritty win over the NSW Waratahs.On a triple header day, the Melbourne Rebels pulverised Japan’s Sunwolves 52-7 to stay one point behind the ACT Brumbies in the Australian pool, although the runaway win came at a price with star scrum-half Will Genia knocked out.last_img read more

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More than just another BRIC in the wall

first_img25 July 2011 South Africa is set to benefit in the next 10 to 15 years from major investment in infrastructure and manufacturing from the BRICS grouping – Brazil, Russia, India, China and now SA – which represents 42% of the world’s population and 18% of its GDP. South Africa’s invitation to join the group last September – and its high-profile inclusion at a well-orchestrated summit in Beijing in mid-April – has put South Africa in the league of the world’s fastest-growing and potentially most influential group of nations. The four founding BRICS differ widely in their economic indicators and demographics, but they all share a need to see a successful conclusion of the Doha round and the removal of barriers between the BRICS themselves to promote more open trade and investment. South Africa’s inclusion is a recognition of its strategic role in Africa and its ability to act as an interlocutor between Africa and the international community rather than because of its population or GDP.BRICS gain momentum The BRICS – the sobriquet coined in the aftershock of the 9/11 attack on the World Trade Centre by Goldman Sachs banker Jim O’Neill in search for the next “big thing” – have gained a momentum of their own in the past decade, which means that in addition to reflecting the changing global economic landscape they are playing an increasing role in shaping it. The recent united insistence by the BRICS that the next chair of the International Monetary Fund should be chosen on competence alone rather than according to a region, indicates a political maturity. It is the first time that a group of developing nations have put pressure on a leading international organisation to select a chief executive who reflects the increasing importance of emerging markets in the global economy. The rising power of the BRICS lobby holds potentially far-reaching consequences for the relationship between China and Africa in general and between South Africa and China in particular and is likely to have a profound impact on China’s rapidly growing trade and investment relationship with South Africa.Zuma’s leadership South African President Jacob Zuma has worked strategically to build the relationship with China and argued persuasively for Africa’s inclusion in the BRICS group through South Africa’s membership. He has already paid a state visit to China, hosted President Hu Jintao in South Africa and attended the BRICS summit in Beijing in April. For Zuma, it is not a question of South Africa boxing above its weight. It is just basic logic that a continent central to sustainable global growth should be included in the club Zuma has already overseen a rapid deepening of South Africa’s relationship with China. Zuma’s leadership stands to win major contracts for South African companies and parastatal corporations in developing African infrastructure in what has become the world’s third-fastest growing market after China and India. Africa grew at 4.5% last year and is expected to reach 5.2% this year. South Africa is set for a more modest 4%. South Africa is also a benefactor of better access to BRICS markets and, at the same time, it is a competitor or joint venture partner in the development of Africa. Aware of the massive savings pool that China and other BRICS nations are sitting on, Zuma is inviting investors from BRICS countries to take up the major infrastructure and manufacturing opportunities in South Africa and on the African continent. Both the private and public sectors of the country stand to be leading beneficiaries of this offer.Mutual credit lines The BRICS have decided in principle to establish mutual credit lines denominated in local currencies rather than US dollars, a move that is seen to promote cooperation between countries over a wide range of projects, and has proven to be able to facilitate trade and investment between these countries. Such arrangements are already working to the mutual benefit of China and Brazil which has deepened China’s relationship with Brazil’s state-owned oil company, Petrobras. Recently, China Development Bank’s Chairman Chen Yuan has said that the bank is prepared to lend up to US$1.5-billion in local currency to fellow BRICS, in particular, for oil and gas projects. Last year, Zuma was appointed to head the African Union’s high-level sub-committee on infrastructure, which will oversee an estimated $480-billion of infrastructure investment on the continent in the next decade. But Zuma’s influence will extend far beyond infrastructure into the vital areas of food production and environment. The realpolitik of the situation is that the bulk of this work is likely to be awarded to China, South Africa and other BRICS.South Africa as global broker With South Africa serving its second term as a non-permanent member of the UN Security Council, and Zuma’s appointment as co-chair of the COP-17 climate change summit to be held in Durban in December, the South African president is well-placed to help forge a grand trade-off between the industrialised and developing worlds. If South Africa can help broker a breakthrough in the global trade-off between environment and development it could give a much-needed boost to South Africa’s own renewable energy and clean technology industries. This COP 17 will have made major progress by establishing either a reformed global market mechanism to regulate emissions or by extending the current one to include the United States and China. China, both because of necessity and its history of pragmatic adjustment, is well-placed to become the world leader in developing cleaner and more sustainable technologies which will supplement and ultimately replace fossil fuels as the world’s primary source of energy. South Africa is ideally placed to contribute to this global priority. After hosting the World Summit on Sustainable Development in 2002 and more recently committing to the Clean Development Mechanism South Africa has vowed to reach its targets on reducing emissions and carbon management. But in a country with high unemployment and underdevelopment, it has to continually weigh the dictates of environmental management with those of developmental priorities.Thinking BRICS As the pace of regional integration within the Southern African Development Community (SADC) quickens – a goal that Zuma has put near the top of his priorities list – the economic rewards for South Africa will come in the form of increased foreign direct investment and expanding trade relations. The evolving free trade agreement between the overlapping regional economic communities of SADC, the Common Market of East and Southern Africa (Comesa) and the East African Community (EAC) is likely to give further impetus to this process. South Africa is already thinking BRICS. It is upgrading flight connections and tourism offerings to the BRICS nations as well as tailoring investment opportunities and conditions to meet the requirements of its new-found strategic partners. President Zuma has pointed out that South Africa’s membership of BRICS will open access to the markets of the world’s high-growth developing economies as well as heralding new and exciting opportunities for South African companies to develop new business and partnerships. South Africa’s robust private sector is gradually waking up to these opportunities and some – such as Standard Bank – were ahead of the game when they sold 20 percent of the bank to International Commercial Bank of China three years ago in what was China’s largest-ever foreign investment at the time. Since then, several key Chinese companies have opened offices in the country and Beijing has located the Africa headquarters of the China-Africa Development Fund in Johannesburg.Potential game changer BRICS, with Africa now represented in “the club”, will deepen south-south co-operation and have the potential to change the game rules of international finance and trade and give a voice to developing countries on a whole range of issues ranging from climate change to development. The main priority of the BRICS is to ensure that the Doha round is completed and that the industrialised countries scrap subsidies and protectionist measures to allow the developing world better access to global markets. Such a move would boost the level of international trade although it would shift the balance towards the markets of the south and the east. This shift is already taking place, and will gain momentum, but an orderly transition via the WTO would be less disruptive. Africa is set to achieve growth levels which will empower its 1-billion citizens and enable the continent to elevate millions from poverty as China has done for some 400-million poor in the past 30 years. South Africa’s inclusion in the BRICS in December last year, largely as a result of strong lobbying by China, came as a surprise to many – not least to O’Neill, who argued that countries such as Indonesia, Turkey and South Korea were far stronger contenders. But such notions underestimate South Africa’s strategic importance to Africa, China and the industrialised world and its unique potential in acting as a bridge between them. South Africa will continue with its membership of the trilateral commission comprising India, Brazil and South Africa (IBSA) as well as its key membership of the G20 group of nations.Hurdles But there are hurdles on the road ahead. The China-South Africa trade relationship is heavily in China’s favour, and it will take some skilful political arm-twisting to achieve a more sustainable trade balance by getting the Chinese engaged in more joint ventures, manufacturing and beneficiation in line with the country’s recently released economic road-map, the National Growth Path, which seeks to ensure more leave-behind from foreign investors. Despite China’s position as South Africa’s biggest two-way trade partner based on South African exports of mineral resources, the European Union remains South Africa’s most important export market and responsible for 40% of foreign investment. But it is probably inevitable in the medium to long-term that China will become a more important export market for South Africa goods. While the United States is set to remain by far the most powerful global economy in the next two decades – the changes now under way and symbolised by the BRICS group will prepare the ground for profound changes in the global order in the next 20 to 25 years. South Africa and China – and the other BRIC nations – will be key players in the forging of a more interdependent, sustainable and equitable world. John Battersby is UK country manager of the International Marketing Council of South Africa. Yingni Lu is a London-based development professional specialising in clean technology and renewable energy. She is a partner at London-based Forbury Environmental.last_img read more

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Mobile Firefox Comes to Android (Sort of)

first_imgFennec: Slow to Launch?We first heard of Mozilla’s plans to bring Fennec to Android back in June of last year when Google announced a change in how software can run on Android. After the release of a new Android NDK that used C/C++ programming languages – the same as Firefox – Mozilla began to consider the possibilities of bringing the Fennec browser to the Google-branded mobile platform. In October, Mozilla CEO John Lilly re-confirmed the organization’s plans to build an Android version, while touting its many features like support for “Javascript, CSS, Flash, SVG, video and audio.” It would be “the first mobile browser to support add-ons,” he said. Now it’s nearly 9 months later and there’s still not a usable version of the browser for Android devices – just pre-alpha builds like this. Should we be concerned? Should Mozilla? While waiting for a real version of Fennec, the popularity of Webkit-based browsers continues to grow, Opera gains mobile ground (especially on feature phones), and last month, Microsoft announced a new mobile OS launching by year-end, Windows Phone 7 Series. This OS will include an updated version of Internet Explorer Mobile that offers multi-touch gesture support and tabbed browsing, among other features. Mozilla is expected to release a working build of Fennec around the same time, but depending on the exact launch dates, they may not get to claim “first” anymore – at least among the top web browsers out there. (Third-party apps already deliver tabbed browsing on various mobile devices). That being said, support for Mozilla is still strong. And once functional, it may have a lot more to offer than its competitors. In the meantime, intrepid Android geeks will be definitely be interested in giving this new fan-compiled Fennec build a look. However, general Android users should probably stay away for now – this version is by no means meant for daily use. Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … sarah perez Fennec, the mobile version of the Firefox web browser, is now available in an early build designed for Android handsets thanks to a fan-compiled download posted on an Android developers forum. And by early, we mean unofficial, pre-alpha, device-specific and downright buggy. But for anyone interested in mobile browser developments, this port is an interesting sneak peek into the future of Firefox’s mobile plans.Fennec for DroidGerman developer Martin Schirr’s version of Fennec is ideal for Droid users because it requires a hardware-based keyboard. Without support for touch input or multi-touch, it won’t work on all flavors of the Google Android mobile operating system. It’s also a hefty download – 41 MB in size. And it freezes upon first boot. Plus, it’s slow and prone to crashes and bugs. But that’s what pre-alpha means – especially a pre-alpha that wasn’t released by the Mozilla organization itself. So what can you do with the Android version of Fennec? Well, you can test out its features, like tabbed browsing, tab synchronization between desktop and mobile and browser add-ons. Right now, there aren’t too many add-ons available, but given the stage of development, that’s not surprising. The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technology Related Posts Tags:#Browsers#Google#mobile#web Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaceslast_img read more

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Database Planning: Avoid Missed Fields

first_imgHow to Write a Welcome Email to New Employees? Related Posts Back when we showed you how logging can save you, we touched on the subject of listing fields prior to building your database.Once you’ve been building software for a while, you may find yourself jumping into the development stage before you’re ready. In some cases this may work just fine, but if you end up missing some critical functionality, you’ll look pretty silly.Planning the structure of your database can help you to avoid missing out key fields and build the application right first time. Here’s a working example.TransactionsTypical fields you might use when dealing with transactions include:Unique IdDescriptionCreditDebitUser IdThis would get you started, but there are some gaping holes in this list. Where’s the date? How about the balance?Content ManagementFields you might need when dealing with content management include:Unique IdTitleContentUser IdCreated DateThis should work for a basic system. In the future you might add things like tags and categories – but should you build everything into the first release? This shows it may be worthwhile to keep things simple to begin with – otherwise, you could add every possible field and never release the system.There’s also the subject of whether to store the data for an area of functionality in one table or multiple tables. For instance, in the content table, you might have a status field that includes values such as Draft, Scheduled, Published, Private, and Deleted. How many of these are essential for the first release? Would you put these in a separate table or just as a single field in the content table?Generally speaking, it’s good to have a plan from the start, and try to be consistent throughout the system. Otherwise, things can get very messy.Photo by Tim Morgan 7 Types of Video that will Make a Massive Impac… Tags:#hack#tips center_img Why You Love Online Quizzes ben barden Growing Phone Scams: 5 Tips To Avoidlast_img read more

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Sesame Street And Autism See Amazing In All Children

first_img“If it’s happening on Sesame Street, we know we can create awareness on every street in America,” says Ernie Merlan, the Program Director for Exceptional Minds, one of 14 collaborating partners for a new Sesame Street initiative launched this week called Sesame Street and Autism: See Amazing in All Children.Shane McKaskle, center, and the other artists at Exceptional Minds school of young adults with autismThe vocational school and studio for young adults with autism was chartered in 2011 with a vision to create a world in which individuals on the spectrum are recognized for their talents and abilities, and are able to achieve their full potential. That vision has since been realized many times over, both in the growth of the school and in the achievements of its graduating artists who now work in the demanding field of visual effects for the entertainment industry.Sesame Street and Autism: See Amazing in All Children is the latest in a growing list of impressive projects that the visual effects artists at Exceptional Minds have worked on, among them “Ant-Man,” “Avengers: Age of Ultron,” “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes” and “American Hustle.”“We are proud to partner with Exceptional Minds to create these critical resources for the community,” says Sherrie Westin, Executive Vice President of Global Impact and Philanthropy for Sesame Workshop. “This collaboration is a perfect example of what this initiative is all about: seeing the amazing in all people. These young men and women at Exceptional Minds are creative, determined and amazing artists.” “We hope to lead by example and help educate the public about autism, and we recognized immediately that Sesame Street shared that same goal,” adds Merlan.For the Sesame Street and Autism: See Amazing in All Children initiative, Exceptional Minds Studio and its artists (who are all in their 20s and on the spectrum) met with Sesame’s creative and production teams at the school’s Sherman Oaks studios to brainstorm ideas and collaborate on the media content. This resulted in the creation of Benny’s Story, an animated short of young Benny as a typical grade-schooler with autism—which was originated and created by Shane McKaskle and the other artists at Exceptional Minds.Sesame Street and Autism: See Amazing in All Children will provide resources to families, teachers and caregivers around the country to educate them about autism, and tools to help families touched by autism with everyday activities. This initiative was funded with generous support from American Greetings, the Robert R. McCormick Foundation and Kristen Rohr, and aligns with Sesame Workshop’s mission to help all children grow smarter, stronger and kinder.“I think all of us have felt left out or different when we were younger. I don’t think I ever felt truly accepted until I got here at Exceptional Minds,” says McKaskle, who is part of Exceptional Minds’ graduating class of 2015 and now provides contract services by the project for Exceptional Minds Studio, an approved studio for Paramount, HBO, Disney, Marvel Studios, 21st Century Fox and Lionsgate.Autism affects one in 68 children. Currently, the majority of the nation’s 3.5 million people with autism are unemployed or underemployed, according to government statistics. More than 500,000 U.S. children impacted by autism will enter adulthood during this decade, with one in 68 children to follow. Exceptional Minds is the only vocational school and working studio to prepare and successfully place young men and women with autism in careers in the fields of animation and visual effects.last_img read more

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