ABC’s Little Mermaid Live Special Back on Track with Auli’i Cravalho as Ariel & Queen Latifah as Ursula

first_imgQueen Latifah(Photo: Bruce Glikas for Broadway.com) View Comments Auli’i Cravalho(Photo: Frazer Harrison/Getty Images) ABC has announced a November 5, 2019 airdate for its live concert presentation of The Little Mermaid, according to The Hollywood Reporter. Auli’i Cravalho (Moana, Rise) will take on the title role for the special, which was first announced in 2017 but postponed shortly after. The 8:00pm event, which will air as part of the Wonderful World of Disney series, will also feature Queen Latifah as Ursula and Shaggy as Sebastian. ABC’s Little Mermaid event will include elements from the Disney animated musical blended with live performances of Alan Menken and Howard Ashman’s beloved songs. Based on a classic Hans Christian Andersen story, The Little Mermaid focuses on a young mermaid named Ariel (Cravalho) who wants nothing more than to live life on land. She gives away her voice to an evil sea urchin named Ursula (Latifah) in exchange for the chance to spend time out of the water, at the behest of her vocal friend, a crab named Sebastian (Shaggy).First produced by Disney as a 1989 animated film, The Little Mermaid was adapted to the stage as a 2008 Broadway musical headlined by Sierra Boggess as Ariel. An upcoming live-action film remake, starring Halle Bailey, is currently in the works.Additional casting for ABC’s Little Mermaid special will be announced at a later date.last_img read more

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CCV announces new certificate programs

first_imgCommunity College of Vermont,Vermont Business Magazine Beginning this fall, students will have four additional pathways to high-demand careers through new certificate programs at the Community College of Vermont (CCV).The new certificate offerings are afterschool and youth work, cybersecurity fundamentals, IT service desk specialist and pharmacy technician. These join the College’s fourteen existing certificate programs to provide a comprehensive offering of high-value credentials that prepare students for the workplace or further education. Most certificates can be completed in just one year.“Enrolling in a certificate program can be a great way to advance or get started on a career,” said CCV Academic Dean Deborah Stewart. “Most of the courses are discipline-specific in order to prepare students for the particular work they’ll be performing. In addition, CCV’s certificate programs are stackable. This means that students can take the courses they complete in the certificate and apply them to the relevant associate degree program.”The College offers 11 associate of arts and associate of science degrees, and 23 of CCV’s 29 certificate and degree programs can be completed fully online.CCV’s fall semester begins September 8th.CCV is Vermont’s second-largest college, serving over 10,000 students each year. With 12 locations and extensive online learning options, our students don’t have to travel far from their communities to access our degree and certificate programs, workforce, secondary and continuing education opportunities, and academic and veterans support services.Source: MONTPELIER, Vt. — CCV 7.20.2020last_img read more

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Barry U. project training public defenders in juvenile issues

first_imgBarry U. project training public defenders in juvenile issues November 1, 2009 Jan Pudlow Senior Editor Regular News Barry U. project training public defenders in juvenile issues Senior EditorCarrie Lee was only 18 when she started working as an investigator for the 10th Circuit Public Defender’s Office and would come home and announce: “I was in the jail today.”“My mom would say, ‘Poor baby.’” But Lee thrived on the rich experience of helping others that continued after law school. For more than six years at the Ninth Circuit Public Defender’s Office, she handled all aspects of criminal defense and appeals, including serving as lead attorney with the juvenile division.Now Lee, a longtime child advocate, has found the perfect job mixing social and legal work as the new director of the Juvenile Justice Center at Barry University’s Dwayne O. Andreas School of Law. She is also spearheading pilot projects funded by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Models for Change.“I love doing what I do now. There are days I miss helping kids directly, but now I am able to help kids indirectly,” Lee said.“We are hoping to do all of this to improve the advocacy of attorneys for children in delinquency court. We want to do some great systemic change around the state.”Changes are needed, children’s advocates agree.Two years ago, 22 observers from Florida and the U.S. visited juvenile courts in 15 urban, suburban, and rural counties in half of the state’s 20 judicial circuits. They watched courts in action and interviewed judges, defense counsel, probation officers, prosecutors, and other juvenile court personnel. It was all part of a National Juvenile Defender Center project requested by the Florida Supreme Court, The Florida Bar, and the Florida Public Defender Association.One glaring need was for better training for juvenile attorneys in a specialized area of the law, rather than flinging new attorneys into juvenile court as a training ground. These rookie public defenders are often reassigned before they fully grasp the job. The assessment found that too often children were pleading guilty just to get their cases over with, not really understanding the ramifications. Those kids who do talk to a lawyer often meet harried, inexperienced juvenile defenders for the first and only time in crowded courtrooms and chaotic hallways.Lee is on a mission to train assistant public defenders in juvenile court, where the goal is rehabilitation, not punishment.“Our goal is to meet with elected public defenders, and slowly but surely try to emphasize that you need to keep specialized attorneys. You deal with adolescent brain development and parent issues with adults. There are so many outside issues, other than what are good practices at trial,” said Lee. “There are crossover kids in both the dependency and delinquency system. There are special education issues.”Lee said she has a listserv of 250 attorneys who can post questions and get help from each other.“A lot of times, a defender will be in court in a bench trial and ask: ‘What do I do?’ Especially in rural counties, where you only have one attorney assigned to juvenile court, other attorneys are an invaluable resource for them.”She knows that Florida’s juvenile courts vary from circuit to circuit and county to county. For example, some rural areas, she said, may only have 30 juvenile trials a year, where in Orlando she had 30 juvenile trials in one day.But there is a constant: Juvenile court is supposed to be a place to help children turn around their lives.“We like to emphasize that we are not only an advocate and fight for the kid, but we also try to help them and provide services, and see if you can help them in addition to advocating and not just getting them off.”To reach all public defenders in the state, every month Lee conducts a Learn at Lunch hour-long CLE conference call on a number of topics. One recent session covered the special challenges of defending an increasing number of girls charged with crimes and who are also victims of sexual and physical abuse.The Juvenile Justice Center also conducts two live seminars a year. The one coming up December 10-12 in Orlando is co-sponsored by the National Institute of Trial Advocacy and will give defenders a chance to do opening statements and cross-examination on a case while being videoed; the defenders will receive feedback to improve trial skills.Currently, there is a pilot project in the Miami-Dade Public Defender’s Juvenile Unit taking guidelines of best practices and putting them into action every day. In a year, Lee said, they will evaluate what works and what doesn’t about the new guidelines, created by a group led by Gerry Glynn, director of clinical programs at Barry’s law school, and now pending approval by the Bar’s Legal Needs of Children Committee.To address the problem of too many kids waiving their right to counsel, Lee said: “We are going to a circuit with relatively high waiver-of-counsel numbers. We would like every child represented by counsel, so we are trying to at least make sure the child has a meaningful opportunity to consult before waiving that right. Most kids now are getting counsel. In some circuits, it’s not even an issue because the judge appoints counsel in every case.. . . But some circuits interpret a meaningful opportunity to consult with an attorney as giving a speech before arraignment. To me, meaningful is having a chat one-on-one and explaining the collateral consequences.”Court is confusing to kids, and some are low-functioning and don’t realize what they are giving up by pleading out, Lee said. For example, even though a child being found delinquent as a juvenile is not supposed to come up on a background check, it often does, and it’s hard to get hired at a job. If children wind up on a sex offender registration list, they can’t even get licensed to be a hairstylist, Lee said.“One of the things I’m really excited about is some juvenile defenders have formed a camaraderie. It’s a niche field, and it’s nice for them to know others doing this work,” Lee said of the networking that serves as both training and support group.last_img read more

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Distraction reduces pain, study finds

first_imgmsnbc.com:When you distract yourself from pain, you actually hurt less, a new study suggests.Study participants who were subjected to slight pain on their forearms reported less discomfort when they were asked to perform a distracting mental test as the pain was delivered.Moreover, when participants were given a placebo “pain relief” cream, and distracted at the same time, their pain was even more reduced.“Both placebo and distraction are effective mechanisms for reducing pain. You can combine them and you don’t lose anything,” said study researcher Jason Buhle, who conducted the research as part of his doctoral dissertation from Columbia University.Read the full story: msnbc.com More of our Members in the Media >last_img read more

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NWS: Today’s High Near 82; Tonight’s Low Around 58

first_imgThe National Weather Service forecasts today’s high in Los Alamos near 82 with mostly sunny skies and tonight’s low around 58. Courtesy/NWSlast_img

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Firmware for flow meters and controllers launched

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

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Top News of the Week Aug 18 – 24, 2014

first_imgSunken Barge Carried Working Platforms for Baltic 2 OWFA barge that sank on Wednesday morning (August 13) off Darßer Ort in the Baltic Sea was carrying four working platforms for the EnBW Baltic 2 offshore wind farm, the company confirmed to Offshore WIND.Siemens: Order Placed for 67 Dudgeon Offshore Wind TurbinesSiemens Energy has received an order from the Norwegian energy utilities Statoil and Statkraft for the Dudgeon Offshore Wind Farm in the UK. Siemens will manufacture, deliver, install and commission 67 Siemens direct-drive wind turbines rated at 6 megawatts (MW) each and equipped with a 154-meter rotor.Two-Bladed 6MW Turbines to Spin in Scottish WatersThe Crown Estate has entered into an Agreement for Lease with Forthwind Limited, a subsidiary of 2-B Energy, for the UK’s first offshore demonstration of two-bladed turbines on the seabed at Methil in Scotland, consisting of two full scale units.DolWin Beta to Arrive in Haugesund TonightDolWin beta high‐voltage direct current (HVDC) platform will arrive at the yard in Haugesund tonight, subject to weather conditions, Aibel announced at its social network page today.Vessel Damaged after Alliding with Walney OWF TurbineLiverpool Coastguard is coordinating the recovery of a ship damaged following an allision with a wind turbine pile at Walney Wind Farm, off Barrow-in-Furness.last_img read more

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Singapore Navy Saves 5 from Capsized Trawler

first_imgSingaporean Navy rescued five fishermen after their Malaysian-registered trawler capsized some 7 nautical miles north-east of Pedra Branca on Tuesday, September 22.The Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore (MPA) coordinated the rescue operation after receiving a report of the incident at about 9:40 am local time Tuesday.All five crew members onboard were rescued by the Republic of Singapore Navy patrol vessel, RSS Independence.Two crew members had sustained minor injuries and were treated by the crew of RSS Independence.The rescued crew have safely reached Singapore. The authorities are currently verifying their nationalities.MPA has deployed three vessels to conduct salvage operations in Singapore waters and to ensure navigational safety.MPA has also issued navigational broadcasts to ships warning them to stay clear of the incident area.last_img read more

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Aibel in new round of job cuts

first_imgOffshore Energy Today Staff Aibel, a Norwegian service company for the oil and gas industry, has reportedly decided to trim its workforce some more.The company which in the past two years cut its headcount by more than 700 workers due to spending reductions by the oil companies, will lay off a 100 workers more, Stavanger’s Aftenbladet reported Monday.According to the local newspaper, this time, Aibel’s Modifications business area in Stavanger, employing 500 workers in total, will be affected.The oilfield services company in December 2015 scored a new maintenance and modification (M&M) contract worth approximately $864.4 million, plus options with the country’s largest oil company, Statoil. Under the agreement, Aibel will have continued responsibility for 12 offshore installations and four facilities, and will also be responsible for Aasta Hansteen.Aibel then said the deal was expected to employ about 1,000 employees at Aibel. It is valid as of March 1, 2016.However, this contract won’t mean much to the people affected by the new round of layoffs.Aftebladet cited an Aibel spokesperson as saying that the decision to cut more jobs had been made „as a result of developments in the market for this business area.“Offshore Energy Today has reached out to Aibel, seeking more info.Aibel’s spokesperson said: “We have informed that there will be a layoff of up to 100 employees in the business area Modifications. All layoffs in Stavanger.”last_img read more

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Interpreter problems ‘unacceptable’ says ministry

first_imgThe Ministry of Justice has criticised the ‘unacceptable’ number of problems in the first weeks of a controversial new contract to run court interpreting services. It has emerged this week that a trial hearing at Leeds Crown Court had to be called off because no one was available to translate for the Czech defendant. The aborted trial is set to cost the court service thousands of pounds in legal fees and other costs. It is one of a litany of cases highlighted by professional interpreters since the MoJ’s exclusive contract with Applied Language Solutions (ALS) began on 1 February. The government has already allowed courts and tribunals to appoint their own interpreters rather than going through ALS’s hub. It has today made its first public censure of its own contractor. An MoJ spokesman said: ‘There have been an unacceptable number of problems in the first weeks of full implementation of the contract and we have asked the contractor to take urgent steps to improve performance. ‘We remain committed to ensuring the rights and needs of those who require interpreters are safeguarded, and are monitoring the system on a daily basis.’ A court worker at Leeds Crown Court confirmed that the Czech national was due to be tried for affray and two counts of possession of a bladed implement in public, but the trial was halted on Wednesday morning. The MoJ says there will be a re-trial in April. It was reported that the judge in the case, Judge Robert Bartfield, warned the aborted trial will cost thousands of pounds and he apologised to the jurors, witnesses and defendant himself whose time was wasted. Czech interpreter Dr Zuzana Windle, a former director of the Professional Interpreters’ Alliance based in Leeds, said she would have been happy to work on the case if ALS had not been involved. However, she added: ‘I am not prepared to subject myself to the degrading prospect of having to pay for an agency assessment and working for ridiculously low rates.’ ALS chief executive Gavin Wheeldon responded to growing criticism earlier this week by increasing mileage rates for staff and offering a £5 incentive to interpreters accepting bookings through an online system. He promised there would be an improvement in the company’s performance, but interpreters are reporting a host of delayed proceedings. A website set up by interpreters has received dozens of anecdotes from people with examples of poor performance. There are claims that non-English speaking defendants are being kept for extra nights in custody because no one is available to translate their case, whilst immigration tribunals are said to have been adjourned due to an absence of interpreters. Labour has called for an urgent inquiry into how the contract with ALS, which was bought by Capita in December, was negotiated. A spokesman said: ‘Tough questions need to be asked. How did this debacle happen? It’s just another example of poorly considered, rushed cuts by a ministry that accepted cuts that go too far and too fast.’last_img read more

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