CU-Boulder Engineering Professor Named Among Top 100 Young Innovators

first_img Published: Nov. 23, 1999 Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Kristi Anseth, associate professor of chemical engineering at CU-Boulder, is among 100 top young innovators “who exemplify the spirit of innovation” in science, technology and the arts, as featured in the November/December issue of “Technology Review.” The list of innovators — which is grouped in software, biotechnology, World Wide Web, materials science and hardware categories — was culled from 600 nominations by a panel of distinguished judges. The panel of judges included David Baltimore, Nobel laureate in medicine and president of the California Institute of Technology; William A. Wulf, president of the National Academy of Engineering; Alfred R. Berkeley, head of the NASDAQ stock exchange and other top academic officers and venture capitalists. The nominees, all under the age of 35, were evaluated on their accomplishments and their “potential to make an impact in the future,” according to the magazine, published by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Anseth, 31, is known for her work in developing new techniques and materials that show promise for faster healing of severe bone fractures and regeneration of cartilage in ailing joints. Her work involves the use of ultraviolet light to make repeating chains of complex molecules called polymers into putty-like, three-dimensional “scaffolds” that can be implanted into areas of bone or cartilage injury. The polymers degrade over time as healing takes place. The new process, patented by Anseth and licensed by a major Midwest biotechnology company, has shown promise in animal studies at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. The magazine’s profile of Anseth states: “Anseth’s ability to wring the most out of materials is evidence of a ‘superior creative genius’ according to Robert Langer, an MIT professor and the father of modern biomaterials.” Anseth received her doctorate from CU-Boulder in 1994 and did post-doctoral research with Langer at MIT. She returned to CU-Boulder to join the chemical engineering faculty in 1996. Anseth’s research also has earned her a prestigious David and Lucille Packard Fellowship, a National Institutes of Health FIRST Award and a CAREER Award from the National Science Foundation, all totaling $1.2 million over a period of several years. To view the issue of “Technology Review” online, go to www.techreview.com.last_img read more

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CU-Boulder Spring Parents Weekend Features 'The Right Stuff' In Arts, Academics, Athletics And Astronauts

first_imgShare Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Spring Parents Weekend, Feb. 25-27 at the University of Colorado at Boulder, will give parents the opportunity to learn about CU’s connection to space, attend a basketball game and learn about off-campus housing options. The reservation deadline for parents who want to participate is Friday, Feb. 4. Parents can view astronaut mementos during the reception in the CU Heritage Center and hear Professor Jim Palmer’s film lecture on, “The Right Stuff,” about the selection of the Mercury astronauts. In addition, astrophysicist Joe Romig will talk about space and other developments in the 21st century. The programs will complement a celebration of space and groundbreaking planned for commencement that will be attended by CU-Boulder astronaut alumni. In addition to cheering on the CU Women’s Basketball team as they battle Missouri, parents can hear Coach Ceal Barry speak during the luncheon on Saturday, Feb. 26. Barry is in her 17th season with CU-Boulder. “Finding Housing Off Campus,” last year’s most popular session, also is scheduled for this year. The session will provide information about assistance available through Off-Campus Student Services. Spring Parents Weekend offers parents a chance to see their sons or daughters, meet other parents and experience some of the top academic and cultural offerings CU-Boulder has to offer. Parents who would like more information about the weekend can call the CU Office of Parent Relations at (303) 492-2283 or visit the Web site at www.colorado.edu and follow the links to the Parents Association. Published: Jan. 26, 2000 last_img read more

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Lilly Endowment Fellows Named At CU-Boulder School Of Journalism

first_imgShare Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail The School of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of Colorado at Boulder has awarded three doctoral dissertation fellowships in religion, media and culture for the 2004-05 academic year. The three recipients are Alexandra Boutros, Mark Elmore and Bahiyyih Watson Maroon. Each will receive a $12,000 stipend from Lilly Endowment Inc. in Indianapolis. “These students are outstanding emergent scholars who have a great deal to contribute,” said Lynn Schofield Clark, assistant research professor. “Their work will add to understandings of how the proliferation of media systems around the world are changing religious practices and understandings.” This is the third year of the Lilly dissertation fellowship program, made possible by a multiyear grant. The purpose of the fellowship is to bring together students at similar stages in their dissertation research and writing processes who share interests in the intersection of media, religion and culture. Boutros, a doctoral candidate in the department of art history and communication studies at McGill University in Montreal, studies contemporary intersections of religion, media, commodity culture and globalization in the religious practices of Haitian Vodou in North America. Elmore, a doctoral candidate in the department of religious studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara, studies visual and print media in northwest India and issues related to Himachali citizenship. Watson Maroon, a doctoral candidate in cultural anthropology at the University of California, Santa Cruz, studies the social transformations accompanying the emergence of innovative media and communication technologies. Her fieldwork is taking place in Casablanca, Morocco. The fellows will participate in two master seminars. One will take place at the American Academy of Religion Annual Conference in November and the other is a two-day seminar at CU-Boulder in February. At both of the seminars, leading scholars in media, religion and culture will interact with the fellows, their advisers and a research team at CU-Boulder’s School of Journalism, headed by Professor Stewart Hoover and Clark. Three fellowship grants of $12,000 each are available to doctoral candidates engaged in research involving media, religion and culture for 2005-06. The grants are designed to coincide with the development of dissertation research in the early stages of candidacy. Deadline for these applications is April 5, 2005. Applications are available online at http://www.mediareligion.org/. For more information contact Hoover at (303) 492-4833 or [email protected], or Scott Webber at (303) 735-3053 or [email protected] Published: Sept. 22, 2004 last_img read more

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CU-Boulder Sponsored Research Awards Total $256.5 Million For Fiscal 2006

first_imgShare Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Published: Oct. 4, 2006 The University of Colorado at Boulder received $256.5 million in sponsored research awards for the 2006 fiscal year, nearly two-thirds of it from four of the largest federal agencies. As in recent years, CU-Boulder’s leading funding agencies for 2006 were NASA ($48.9 million), the Department of Health and Human Services ($43 million), the National Science Foundation ($39.7 million) and the Department of Commerce ($31.9 million). In addition, CU-Boulder was awarded $3.4 million in federal funds for space research from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena and the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, said Randall Draper, director of the CU-Boulder Office of Contracts and Grants. The 2006 total for the campus is down less than 1 percent from the 2005 total of $257.6 million, reflecting a trend in recent years of tight federal funding. CU-Boulder received a record $259.7 million in sponsored research funding in 2004 and first topped the $200 million mark in 1999. CU-Boulder also received $13.3 million from the Department of Defense, $7.4 million from the Department of Energy, $5.1 million from the Department of Education and $1.8 million from the Department of the Interior in 2006, Draper said. CU-Boulder also received about $15.7 million from industry, $9.6 million from the state of Colorado and $21.9 million from other universities in 2006. Campus-based research institutes and the Graduate School received about $144.7 million of the sponsored research funding to CU-Boulder for 2006, led by the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics with $42.7 million and the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences with $40.5 million. CIRES is a joint institute of CU-Boulder and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Federal research and development funding for universities has remained relatively flat for the past several years, while institutional competition for those dollars is increasing nationwide, said Draper. On the positive side, collaborative institutes at CU-Boulder continue to do well, he said.last_img read more

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Victims Of Today's Gold Run Condominium Fire Asked To Assemble At Condo Health Center; Temporary Lodging, Meal Service Made Available

first_imgA fire at the Gold Run Condominium Complex that started about 2:45 a.m. this morning has displaced an unknown number of University of Colorado at Boulder students and other residents.Three people were admitted to Boulder Community Hospital for smoke inhalation. At this point serious injuries have not been reported, according to officials at the scene. It is not yet known if any of the three people admitted to Boulder Community Hospital were CU-Boulder students.Boulder Fire Department officials this morning issued an urgent request that all persons affected by the fire assemble at the Gold Run Health Club on Shadow Creek Road as soon as possible. The Gold Run complex is located off 30th Street between Arapahoe Avenue and Colorado Avenue.The fire has affected a 36-unit building straddling two addresses, 2800 and 2802, and reportedly displaced about 50 residents. One of the two buildings reportedly sustained severe damage and was continuing to smolder at mid-morning today.CU-Boulder students affected by the fire are being directed to call the following numbers for more information on securing temporary shelter for the weekend and for assistance with contacting faculty about coursework and making other arrangements. The numbers to call are (303) 492-8476 or (303) 492-8477.Temporary shelter for students will be made available by the university today at the CU Recreation Center in the mat room. Some students reportedly have made arrangements to stay with friends or relatives.Temporary meal passes for CU-Boulder residence hall dining services also are available to students affected by the fire. Students who have been processed through the Gold Run Health Club or the Recreation Center can obtain the temporary meal passes.Campus Housing officials also are working with local hotels to provide temporary housing until permanent space can be identified. Plans for long-term shelter for displaced students will be announced later.Additional information on university services for students affected by the fire will be released as it becomes available and posted on the CU-Boulder Web site at www.colorado.edu. Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Published: Oct. 25, 2007 last_img read more

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New technologies challenge old ideas about early hominid diets

first_imgShare Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail New assessments by researchers using the latest high-tech tools to study the diets of early hominids are challenging long-held assumptions about what our ancestors ate, says a study by the University of Colorado Boulder and the University of Arkansas.By analyzing microscopic pits and scratches on hominid teeth, as well as stable isotopes of carbon found in teeth, researchers are getting a very different picture of the diet habitats of early hominids than that painted by the physical structure of the skull, jawbones and teeth. While some early hominids sported powerful jaws and large molars — including Paranthropus boisei, dubbed “Nutcracker Man” — they may have cracked nuts rarely if at all, said CU-Boulder anthropology Professor Matt Sponheimer, study co-author.Such findings are forcing anthropologists to rethink long-held assumptions about early hominids, aided by technological tools that were unknown just a few years ago. A paper on the subject by Sponheimer and co-author Peter Ungar, a distinguished professor at the University of Arkansas, was published in the Oct. 14 issue of Science.Earlier this year, Sponheimer and his colleagues showed Paranthropus boisei was essentially feeding on grasses and sedges rather than soft fruits preferred by chimpanzees. “We can now be sure that Paranthropus boisei ate foods that no self-respecting chimpanzee would stomach in quantity,” said Sponheimer. “It is also clear that our previous notions of this group’s diet were grossly oversimplified at best, and absolutely backward at worst.””The morphology tells you what a hominid may have eaten,” said Ungar. But it does not necessarily reveal what the animal was actually dining on, he said.While Ungar studies dental micro-wear — the microscopic pits and scratches that telltale food leaves behind on teeth — Sponheimer studies stable isotopes of carbon in teeth. By analyzing stable carbon isotopes obtained from tiny portions of animal teeth, researchers can determine whether the animals were eating foods that use different photosynthetic pathways that convert sunlight to energy.The results for teeth from Paranthropus boisei, published earlier this year, indicated they were eating foods from the so-called C4 photosynthetic pathway, which points to consumption of grasses and sedges. The analysis stands in contrast to our closest human relatives like chimpanzees and gorillas that eat foods from the so-called C3 photosynthetic pathway pointing to a diet that included trees, shrubs and bushes.Dental micro-wear and stable isotope studies also point to potentially large differences in diet between southern and eastern African hominids, said Sponheimer, a finding that was not anticipated given their strong anatomical similarities. “Frankly, I don’t believe anyone would have predicted such strong regional differences,” said Sponheimer. “But this is one of the things that is fun about science — nature frequently reminds us that there is much that we don’t yet understand.”The bottom line is that our old answers about hominid diets are no longer sufficient, and we really need to start looking in directions that would have been considered crazy even a decade ago,” Sponheimer said. “We also see much more evidence of dietary variability among our hominid kin than was previously appreciated. Consequently, the whole notion of hominid diet is really problematic, as different species may have consumed fundamentally different things.”While the new techniques have prompted new findings in the field of biological anthropology, they are not limited to use in human ancestors, according to the researchers. Current animals under study using the new tooth-testing techniques range from rodents and ancient marsupials to dinosaurs, said Sponheimer.Much of Sponheimer’s research on ancient hominids has been funded by the National Science Foundation. Published: Oct. 13, 2011 Categories:AcademicsScience & TechnologyCampus CommunityNews Headlines Skull of Paranthropus boiseilast_img read more

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Welcome to campus, Class of 2016

first_img Published: Aug. 24, 2012 Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail BY PHILIP P. DISTEFANOIt is my pleasure today to summon you, as new CU-Boulder students, to take part in the legacy of scholarship and contribution left by the students who came before you.Today, we are inviting you to be part of a family – a family of learning, scholarship, inquiry and investigation.Today you begin your transformation from college freshman to college graduate!We are living in a digitized world of sound bites and abbreviated messages – short bursts of information restricted by the parameters of our cell phone screens. Today we are asking you to embark on just the opposite of that.We are asking you to step into an environment where the messages are longer and more complex: theories, discussions, creative works and experiences in learning, discovery and innovation.We are asking you to embark on a personal transformation that cannot be downloaded; that cannot be confined or defined by a YouTube video.This year, in-and-out of the classroom, you will experience the diversity of humanity  — the diversity of thought, background, race, class, religion, geographic origin, and in dozens of ways that echo the diversity of the world.You will have the opportunity to accomplish important research and creative work for the advancement of society through undergraduate research programs.You may:Control satellites in spaceWork on biomedical discoveries that save livesDesign and build sustainable water systems in third-world countriesOr develop sustainable fuels to power the planet. You may produce films, plays, and other creative works that inspire us.You may find yourself living in the same residence hall with your professor in one of our residential academic programs. Your professor may engage you in a hallway discussion on sustainable justice, international affairs, environmental science and yes – the role of communications in modern society. You may be engaged or mentored by a professor who is a Nobel Prize winner or a member of a prestigious national academy in the arts, sciences, education or engineering.You may study alongside students from Boston or Beijing, Mongolia or Meeker. We are a global community.One of the joys of attending school here is that you have an opportunity to meet fellow students from a diversity of cultures and perspectives across the nation and across the world.In our digital world of instant communication we are bombarded by misinformation, unsubstantiated declarations and unproductive showmanship. We will give you the tools to seek the truth and engage in healthy discussions and civil discourse as part of your problem solving skills as citizens in a global society.As Chancellor, I want to personally summon you to this great adventure. And in doing so, I want to invite you to transform yourself, your community, your nation and your world.Ralph Waldo Emerson said, “What lies behind us, and what lies before us, are small matters compared to what lies within us.”Have high expectations as we invite you, the Class of 2016, to leave your legacy.last_img read more

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Improved iClicker+ available for spring semester

first_imgiClicker+ Benefits for StudentsThe new iClicker+ will offer students a variety of advantages:Compatibility: For students who already have an iClicker 1, it will still work! It is not necessary to upgrade to the iClicker+.Cost:  The iClicker+ will cost the same as the former campus-standard iClicker 1.Smaller and lighter:  It’s easier to handle and store, and uses less plastic and packaging.Better battery:  It uses two AAA batteries instead of three, while offering the same battery life as the iClicker 1.Better keypad:  A clearly marked power button is recessed, to help avoid accidental power up or off, and is set apart from the A-E buttons. In addition, the A-E buttons are large, clearly labeled and contain Braille characters.Improved voting:  LED lights next to each button provide better voting confirmation.Frequency memory:  It remembers the last frequency used, so students only have to reset the frequency when attending a different class. Many instructors opt to use iClickers to conduct live Q&A sessions in class with students. Starting this spring, the improved iClicker+ will be available to students for purchase in the campus bookstore. Faculty members who use iClickers should ensure they have the latest iClicker software on their computer. If you are using version 6.1.6 on the Mac or PC, you are current. If you have any prior version, visit this page on the OIT website to download and install the current software. Certain old versions could experience issues with vote counting. iClicker+ Tested by Departments and StudentsCU-Boulder’s Physics department has been leading testing of the new iClicker+ both on campus and nationally, with good results. They’ve also tested favorably with several CU-Boulder student groups. Based on the positive feedback, CU-Boulder selected iClicker+ as the new technology standard. Compatible with Current InfrastructureThe iClicker+ is completely compatible with the current infrastructure in CU-Boulder classrooms. There is no need to change base stations, instructor software or instructor clickers on campus. Purchasing iClickersStarting in the spring semester, the iClicker+ will be available in the bookstore. Students who do not already own an iClicker1 may purchase an iClicker+ for any classes that require clickers. For those who already have an iClicker 1, it will remain compatible with current campus infrastructure, so upgrading is not necessary.center_img Published: Jan. 9, 2013 Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Registering iClickersIt is important for students to register their iClickers with CU-Boulder, so faculty can accurately assign voting results to students. Please remind students to register any new iClickers with CU-Boulder; instructions to do so are available at https://www.colorado.edu/oit/CU-iClicker-registration. Students should not register devices with the commercial iClicker registration page.last_img read more

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NASA’s MAVEN mission completes assembly, begins environmental testing

first_imgCategories:Science & TechnologySpaceNews Headlines Published: Feb. 8, 2013 Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail NASA news releaseNASA’s Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) spacecraft is assembled and is undergoing environmental testing at Lockheed Martin Space Systems facilities, near Denver, Colo. MAVEN is the next mission to Mars and will be the first mission devoted to understanding the Martian upper atmosphere. During the environmental testing phase, the orbiter will undergo a variety of rigorous tests that simulate the extreme temperatures, vacuum and vibration the spacecraft will experience during the course of its mission. Currently, the spacecraft is in the company’s Reverberant Acoustic Laboratory being prepared to undergo acoustics testing that simulates the maximum sound and vibration levels the spacecraft will experience during launch.  Following the acoustics test, MAVEN will be subjected to a barrage of additional tests, including: separation/deployment shock, vibration, electromagnetic interference/electromagnetic compatibility and magnetics testing. The phase concludes with a thermal vacuum test where the spacecraft and its instruments are exposed to the vacuum and extreme hot and cold temperatures it will face in space.  “The assembly and integration of MAVEN has gone very smoothly and we’re excited to test our work over the next six months,” said Guy Beutelschies, MAVEN program manager at Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company. “Environmental testing is a crucial set of activities designed to ensure the spacecraft can operate in the extreme conditions of space.” “I’m very pleased with how our team has designed and built the spacecraft and science instruments that will make our measurements,” said Bruce Jakosky, MAVEN principal investigator from the University of Colorado Boulder’s Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics. “We’ve got an exciting science mission planned, and the environmental testing now is what will ensure that we are ready for launch and for the mission.”  MAVEN is scheduled to ship from Lockheed Martin’s facility to NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in early August, where it will undergo final preparations for launch.  MAVEN, scheduled to launch in November 2013, is a robotic exploration mission to understand the role that loss of atmospheric gas to space played in changing the Martian climate through time. It will investigate how much of the Martian atmosphere has been lost over time by measuring the current rate of escape to space and gathering enough information about the relevant processes to extrapolate backward in time. “This phase of the program is particularly important in that it will provide us with a good assessment of the MAVEN system’s capabilities under the simulated extremes of the space environment,” said David Mitchell, MAVEN project manager at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. “Of significance, the spacecraft is entering system level test right on schedule, while maintaining robust cost and schedule reserves to deal with the technical or programmatic surprises that could occur during test or in the run to launch. Tracking on plan is critically important to being ready for launch later this year and the science that MAVEN will deliver one year later.” MAVEN’s principal investigator is based at the University of Colorado at Boulder’s Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics. The university will provide science operations, science instruments and lead Education/Public Outreach. NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center manages the project and provides two of the science instruments for the mission. Lockheed Martin of Littleton, Colo., built the spacecraft and is responsible for mission operations. The University of California at Berkeley Space Sciences Laboratory provides science instruments for the mission. NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., provides navigation support, the Deep Space Network and the Electra telecommunications relay hardware and operations. For more information on MAVEN, visit:http://lasp.colorado.edu/home/maven/Goddard Release: 13-009 Nancy Neal Jones NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. [email protected]center_img NASA’s MAVEN spacecraft recently completed assembly and has started environmental testing. In the Multipurpose Test Facility clean room at Lockheed Martin, technicians installed the orbiter’s two solar arrays prior to a modal test. (Photo courtesy Lockheed Martin) “I’m very pleased with how our team has designed and built the spacecraft and science instruments that will make our measurements,” said Bruce Jakosky, MAVEN principal investigator from the University of Colorado Boulder’s Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics. “We’ve got an exciting science mission planned, and the environmental testing now is what will ensure that we are ready for launch and for the mission.” last_img read more

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