Public call for inclusion in the national promotion of health tourism CNTB in cooperation with the Croatian Chamber of Commerce

first_imgBusiness entities: providers of dental, ophthalmological, orthopedic and / or diagnostic servicesBasic conditions:Work experience, at least 3 yearsAt least 5 doctors / dentistsAt least 7.500.000 KN of revenues generated in 2015ISO quality certificateadvantages:Opinion of the competent expert institution (HLZ, HDKM)Training of specialists outside CroatiaConcierge / Guest Relations employees at the reception or medical tourism departmentGuarantees for work and conditions of use of the service in case of secondary correctionsCertificates, recognitions and memberships in international organizations (employees, institution, company)Website with content in at least one foreign languageTravel agencies Business entities: spas, special hospitals for medical rehabilitation, spas, spasBasic conditions:Share of commercial revenues in 2015 – at least 15%Share of foreign overnight stays in total overnight stays in 2015 – at least 5%Communication of staff in direct contact with guests in at least 2 foreign languagesadvantages:Number of medical staff according to available beds – at least 1 employee per 10 bedsExistence of development projects according to the implementation phase (preliminary and / or detailed design, etc.)Certificates, recognitions and memberships in international organizations (medical staff, institutions)Recommendations of professional societies or associationsThe tradition of a healing destinationCategorization of the facility (Ministry of Tourism)Concierge / “Guest Relations” employees within the receptionWebsite with content in at least one foreign languageMedical tourism The subject of the Public Invitation is the inclusion of business entities in the national promotion of health tourism, where the holders of excellence in health tourism in Croatia will be presented through the portal of the Croatian National Tourist Board under the common slogan Croatia – Full of Health.In the pilot project of the national promotion of health tourism, the goal is to include business entities that contribute to the following goals:Improving and enriching the tourist offer of the destination in which they are located, as well as Croatia as a wholeDevelopment of contents that enable the extension of the tourist season with an emphasis on year-round business and an increase in catering and tourism in generalStrengthening the strength of the brand and creating a recognizable image of Croatian health tourism Applications with evidence of meeting the criteria marked “Public Call – Health Tourism” can be submitted:in electronic form to: [email protected] orin printed form at:Croatian Chamber of Commerce, Tourism Department, Rooseveltov trg 2, 10000 Zagreb.The public call is open until Friday, January 20, 2017.Additional information is available at: [email protected] Business entities: travel agencies that mediate in the sale of health tourism servicesBasic conditions:Business experience in health tourism, at least 3 yearsNumber of full-time employees – at least 3 peopleContractual representation of business entities (medical, spa, wellness) – at least 3Sale of at least 3 active packages that include the logistics of providing health tourism services with at least 2 elements of the offer, in addition to health services (air transport, transfers, accommodation, food, insurance, trips to the destination, etc.)Website with content in at least three foreign languagesadvantages:Representation of entities in several counties / regions of the Republic of CroatiaNumber of health tourism package packages sold in 2015Certificates, recognitions and memberships in international organizations (employees, company)Specialized intermediaries / facilitatorscenter_img Wellness tourism Basic conditions:Business experience, at least 3 yearsNumber of full-time employees – at least 1 personContract with at least one travel agency in CroatiaContractual representation of business entities (medical, spa, wellness) – at least 3advantages:Partnership in foreign markets – at least 1 partnerRepresentation of entities in several counties / regions of CroatiaAppearance at international tourism fairs – at least 2 fairsCertificates, recognitions and memberships in international organizations (employees, company)Website with content in at least three foreign languages Business entities: wellness hotels, wellness resorts, wellness companiesBasic conditions:Categorization 5 *, 4 *, wellness hotelWellness offer that includes at least 2 of the following 5 elements: sports and recreational activities (fitness), spiritual activities (relaxation rooms, meditation…), relaxation (massages, saunas, jacuzzi…), healthy and natural nutrition (juice bar, special diet , organic food, calorie measurement, menus with wellness dishes…) and beauty programs (face and body)At least 2 active packages in the hotel offer which, in addition to the basic hotel offer (accommodation and food) and wellness offer, include at least 1 more health element (kinesiologist, physiotherapist, nutritionist, pulmonologist, dermatologist, spa offer, etc., in own arrangement or contract)Communication of staff in direct contact with guests in at least 2 foreign languagesadvantages:Year-round operation of the facilityOwn cosmetics for the needs of the wellness programCertificates, recognitions and memberships in international organizations (employees or hotel / company)Website with content in at least one foreign language SPA / spa tourismlast_img read more

Continue reading

Nin Riviera covered by Pointers application

first_imgAs of today, the Nin Riviera, which consists of Nin, Zaton, Privlaka, Vir and Vrsi, is completely covered by the Pointers application.It is a tourist project aimed at creating a personalized digital application for the Nin Riviera, free for users, which is a kind of guide and brings information about beaches, events, gastronomic offer, entertainment, nightlife, bike routes, free WI Fi points, information for boaters, cultural and natural heritage, etc. The application will be enriched with photos, videos, VR360 footage, and what is also important is the marketing destination on seven Pointers platforms (Android, iOS, WEB, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube).”The application will contain a textual description of all attractions and non-commercial content in the first year, and next year all commercial content would join the overall offer of the destination. “Points out dr.sc. Marija Dejanović, director of the Tourist Board Nina. The application is prepared in Croatian, English, German and Italian, and the texts will be accompanied by authentic photos and videos, which include aerial photography, GPS navigation to each content, adding a profile of the tourist community to Google My Business, including location tagging on Google Maps.”In ten days, the Pointers application will be richer for nine more destinations, from the Crikvenica and Opatija Riviera to Korcula. Currently, over 50 destinations in Croatia are included in the Pointers application and we sincerely hope that one day our entire tourist offer, ie all tourist destinations will be presented through our story, to have a complete tourist offer in the palm of one hand.“Points out Maja Kokolari from Pointers dooIn addition to an excellent digital platform and promotion of the entire destination, extremely interesting and commendable, and yet so rare, that the whole project is a joint collaboration of five tourist boards: Nin, Zaton, Privlaka, Vira and Vrsi from four local governments that are decided to jointly promote through collaboration on the Pointers project.Tourism is a synergy, not a dispersion, and this is a great example of how a joint destination should develop a tourist destination. Cooperation, cooperation and only cooperation because without cooperation there is no long-term success.last_img read more

Continue reading

A BRAIN Initiative first: New tool can switch behavior ‘on’ and ‘off’

first_img“This new chemogenetic tool will show us how brain circuits can be more effectively targeted to treat human disease, ” said Bryan L. Roth, MD, PhD, the Michael Hooker Distinguished Professor of Protein Therapeutics and Translational Proteomics at the UNC School of Medicine. “The problem facing medical science is that although most approved drugs target these brain receptors, it remains unclear how to selectively modulate specific kinds of receptors to effectively treat disease.”Roth addressed this problem by inventing a technology he dubbed “DREADDs” – Designer Receptor Exclusively Activated by a Designer Drug.The first-generation DREADD technology was developed in 2007.Essentially, in lab experiments, Roth’s team altered the chemical structure of G protein-coupled receptors so that the receptors expressed synthetic proteins when reintroduced into a mouse. This way, the mutated receptor could only be activated or inhibited by a specific synthesized drug-like compound. The receptor became like a lock; the synthetic drug became the only key that fit the lock. Depending on what Roth’s team wanted to study, they could lock or unlock the specific brain circuits and behaviors associated with that one receptor.This DREADD technology – also known as chemogenetics – is now used by hundreds of labs worldwide. It helped revolutionize our understanding of how brain circuits control normal and abnormal behavior, emotions, perception, pain sensation, memory, and many other processes. DREADDs have been used to improve the function of insulin-producing cells in mice as a way of treating diabetes. DREADD technology has also helped scientists treat epileptic seizures in mice.But scientists could use this first DREADD to only manipulate a single receptor in one direction – excite the receptor or inhibit it.Last year, Roth and UNC colleagues Thomas Kash, PhD, and Jian Jin, PhD, received a $2.84-million NIH BRAIN Initiative grant to develop the next generation of DREADDs.Today in the journal Neuron, UNC and NIH researchers revealed the first fruit of that grant – a new chemogenetic technology they have named KORD (k-opioid receptor DREADD). This new tool, co-invented by Roth and Eyal Vardy, PhD, a former UNC postdoctoral fellow, can target two different kinds of receptors on the same neuron sequentially. This allowed them to study the function of two kinds of receptors as they relate to each other.In the Neuron paper, Roth’s team explain how they modified the receptors in the lab, packaged the receptors in an viral vector, and injected them into mice so that the synthetic receptors were expressed only in certain kinds of neurons in specific parts of the brain.Then they administered the synthetic drug-like compound to demonstrate how neuronal signaling could be manipulated to turn the same neurons ‘on’ and ‘off’ and thereby turning ‘on’ and ‘off’ specific behaviors in mice.In one type of experiment, the NIH lab of Michael Krashes, PhD, was able to turn ‘on’ and ‘off’ voracious feeding behavior in mice. In another type of experiment, UNC researchers were able to turn ‘on’ and ‘off’ behaviors similar to those induced by drugs such as cocaine and amphetamines.Elliot Robinson, an MD/PhD student at UNC and co-first author of the Neuron paper, said, “These experiments have validated KORD as a new tool for researchers interested in controlling the function of specific populations of cells while also highlighting their therapeutic potential.”Reid Johnson, UNC graduate student and paper co-author, said, “Using genetically modified mice, we can now tease apart the interactions between seemingly disparate neuronal systems in a logical fashion.”Roth added, “We are now sharing KORD and other DREADD technology freely with other scientists, and it is likely that new uses for these technologies will appear in the near future.” LinkedIn Researchers at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) have perfected a noninvasive “chemogenetic” technique that allows them to switch off a specific behavior in mice – such as voracious eating – and then switch it back on. The method works by targeting two different cell surface receptors of neurons that are responsible for triggering the specific chemical signals that control brain function and complex behaviors.When this complex signaling system goes awry, the results can lead to a plethora of diseases, including schizophrenia, depression, Alzheimer’s Disease, Parkinson’s Disease, eating disorders, and epilepsy. Cell surface receptors also play roles in cancers, diabetes, digestive conditions, and other diseases. This new technique could be modified to study them, as well.This is the first technology to stem from the initial set of NIH BRAIN Initiative grants to create new cutting-edge research tools to improve our understanding of the brain. Share Share on Facebookcenter_img Email Share on Twitter Pinterestlast_img read more

Continue reading

No differences between lonely and nonlonely people’s attention to negative social info

first_imgShare on Twitter The main purpose of their study was to look at differences between lonely people and nonlonely people to see if they showed differences in how much they pay attention to negative social cues.  Two groups of female students who attended college in the Netherlands were included in this study, including 25 nonlonely and 25 lonely participants.  The UCLA Loneliness Scale was translated into a Dutch version to group the study participants.  This is a 20 item questionnaire that measures how lonely people feel with questions like “How often do you feel left out?” (p.4).Then, the students were given 4 different sets of computer images and told to simply view them like they would TV.  Each set of images contained either social (involving humans) or nonsocial (not involving humans) information including faces, interactions between people, or pictures of random objects.  The women’s eye tracking was measured during each of the 4 sets of images in order to track how much they paid attention to negative social information like angry faces or a robbery negative nonsocial information like a dirty bucket.Results showed that, despite the expectation that differences would be found, there were no significant differences between the lonely and nonlonely participants in the how much they paid visual attention to negative information.  The researchers concluded that this may have occurred because lonely people may pay more attention to negative social information at other times during social interactions such as after they have just witnessed a negative social interaction and not during.Other reasons given for their lack of findings were that perhaps only certain kinds of lonely people pay more attention to negative information than do nonlonely (e.g., children who are still developing social skills) or that lonely people may only pay more attention to negative social information than do nonlonely people during certain situations (e.g., if they are being socially rejected). Share on Facebook Pinterest Researchers from the Netherlands recently examined loneliness to see if it affected how much attention people pay to negative social information like sad or angry faces.  The findings of this study were released in April 2015 in PLoS ONE.  Their findings showed no differences between lonely and nonlonely people in terms of how much attention they give to negative information that they view.Loneliness was defined as “a negative emotional response to a discrepancy between the desired and actual quality or quantity of interpersonal relationships” (p.2).  Previous research has shown that it is highly linked to both depression and social anxiety, and can have negative health consequences like higher disease and death rates.  And there is existing evidence to show that loneliness does impact how a person processes social information.For example, it has been shown that such people have more negative perceptions about social interactions and expectations about how they are viewed by others.  Therefore, the researchers felt that it was important to further study loneliness and its related behaviors, specifically how environmental information is processed.center_img Email LinkedIn Sharelast_img read more

Continue reading

Does psychosis play a role in extreme acts of violence?

first_imgLinkedIn Share Share on Twitter Share on Facebook The study focused on two central areas among high risk patients: within the group as a whole, do hallucinations or delusions immediately occur before acts of violence and within individuals over time, how consistent is psychosis before violent incidents?Participants involved 100 patients involved in the MacArthur Violence Risk Assessment Study, a 12 month study of 1,136 patients discharged from three psychiatric hospitals across the U.S. For purposes of this study, 100 participants met the criteria of being involved in multiple violent incidents in the year following hospital discharge and were able to complete a follow-up interview.  The most common diagnoses among participants included depression, bipolar depression and schizophrenia/other psychotic disorders.  Male participants numbered 58, while female participants numbered 42.In general, the study concluded that psychosis, from time to time, played a role immediately before violent incidents (12% of 305 incidents). Additionally, as the research team hypothesized, patients who exhibited non-psychosis preceded violence (80% of the sample size) could be distinguished from a smaller “mixture” group (those patients with a mixture of psychosis-preceded and non-psychosis preceded violence; 20% of the sample size) of patients who exhibited a degree of psychosis-preceded violence; there was reasonable consistency in this difference.Given the research team were interested in factors which may contribute to harm reduction, characteristics between those former patients who exhibited non-psychosis preceded violence and those who exhibited some psychosis-preceded violence, were examined.Skeem and her research team found that while both groups shared features of antisocial personality disorder, those former patients with no psychosis-preceded violence had reasonably lower verbal intelligence and fairly greater social deviance, arrest frequency, and childhood abuse frequency. On the other hand, those patients in the “mixture group” were reasonably more likely to meet bipolar depression criteria, in addition to modestly meeting the criteria for schizophrenia and or a mental disorder with no substance abuse.The researchers concluded that psychosis-preceded acts of violence are uncommon, and that intervention efforts to reduce acts of violence should target broader considerations: “For large-scale violence reduction, the focus of programming for individuals with repeated violence may need to encompass factors associated with social deviance, whether patients occasionally engage in acts of violence related to psychosis or not.”center_img Pinterest Email Mass shootings across the United States continue to stun and mystify, and researchers using data from the MacArthur Violence Risk Assessment Study, sought to understand how psychosis may play a role in extreme acts of violence.The research, published in Clinical Psychological Science suggests that psychosis plays a role in acts of extreme violence, but only on occasion.Researchers sought to gain greater understanding of the psychological mechanisms involved in violent, high-risk individuals, primarily by focusing on the consistent incidence of psychosis. As noted by primary author Dr. Jennifer Skeem: “if the policy goal is to maximize public safety, then effective risk reduction for these individuals seems a priority.”last_img read more

Continue reading

Neurosurgeons help pave way for deep brain stimulation and Alzheimer’s

first_imgShare on Twitter Share on Facebook LinkedIn Email Neurosurgeons at Barrow Neurological Institute in Phoenix are involved with testing the viability of deep brain stimulation (DBS) to treat Alzheimer’s disease, a disorder that currently has few treatment options. Results from the Phase 2 study, reported in the Journal of Neurosurgery on Dec. 18, 2015, demonstrated the safety of DBS in Alzheimer’s patients.A neurosurgical procedure in which an implanted neurostimulator delivers electrical signals to specific areas of the brain to help regulate abnormal signals, DBS is currently only approved in the U.S. for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease and essential tremor. However, its use is being researched for a number of conditions, including epilepsy, depression and bipolar disorder.Francisco Ponce, MD, Director of the Barrow Center for Neuromodulation, believes there are potential applications for Alzheimer’s disease – the most common form of dementia – as well. Whereas in Parkinson’s disease and essential tremor, the target for the electrodes are nodes within the motor circuits, the Alzheimer’s study targeted the fornix, which is part of the memory pathway.center_img Pinterest Share “There are more than five million Americans living with Alzheimer’s, and yet there are few promising pharmacologic treatment options for this progressive disease,” says Dr. Ponce. “Previous pilot studies researching the use of DBS in Alzheimer’s have indicated the potential to slow cognitive decline in some patients, and have even shown metabolic changes in the brain that may slow the progression of the disease.” Barrow Neurological Institute is part of Dignity Health St. Joseph’s Hospital in Phoenix.The ADvance Trial, using a device from Functional Neuromodulation, Inc., is aimed at evaluating the safety, efficacy and tolerability of DBS in this patient population. Initial research took place between 2012 and 2014 at six hospitals throughout the U.S., including Banner Alzheimer’s Institute in Phoenix and Banner Sun Health Research Institute in Sun City, as well as one institution in Canada. During the trial, 42 patients with mild Alzheimer’s disease underwent the surgical procedure and were closely monitored for adverse effects.Overall, there were no programming-related adverse effects, unanticipated adverse device effects, reported neurological deficits or instances of mortality in the study population. Adverse effects such as headache and infection occurred in 11.9% (5 of 42) of the patients in this study, consistent with rates reported in other DBS trials.“The first phase of this study was designed to evaluate the 90-day postoperative safety of this particular surgical method. While the study was relatively small, we believe the data suggest that DBS surgery targeting the fornix can be performed safely in this patient population. The hope is that our positive surgical experience will help pave the way for future research into DBS and Alzheimer’s,” says Dr. Ponce.Dr. Ponce adds that the next step is evaluating the efficacy and longer-term safety of the treatment, which will not be known until the last patient completes the two-year evaluation later this year.last_img read more

Continue reading

Long-term stress causes inflammation that erodes memory

first_imgShare Share on Facebook Email Share on Twitter This is the first study of its kind to establish the relationship between short-term memory and prolonged stress. In the case of the mice, that meant repeat visits from a larger, nasty intruder mouse.Mice that were repeatedly exposed to the aggressive intruder had a hard time recalling where the escape hole was in a maze they’d mastered prior to the stressful period.“The stressed mice didn’t recall it. The mice that weren’t stressed, they really remembered it,” Godbout said.They also had measurable changes in their brains, including evidence of inflammation brought on by the immune system’s response to the outside pressure. This was associated with the presence of immune cells, called macrophages, in the brain of the stressed mice.The research team was able to pin the short-term memory loss on the inflammation, and on the immune system.Their work, which appears in The Journal of Neuroscience, builds on previous research substantiating the connections between chronic stress and lasting anxiety.The impact on memory and confirmation that the brain inflammation is caused by the immune system are important new discoveries, Godbout said.“It’s possible we could identify targets that we can treat pharmacologically or behaviorally,” he said.It could be that there are ways to interrupt the inflammation, said John Sheridan, who worked on the study and is associate director of Ohio State’s Institute for Behavioral Medicine Research.The mice used in the study are exposed to repeated social defeat – basically dominance by an alpha mouse – that aims to mimic chronic psychosocial stress experienced by humans.Researchers at Ohio State seek to uncover the secrets behind stress and cognitive and mood problems with a long-range goal of finding ways to help those who are anxious, depressed and suffer from lasting problems, including post-traumatic stress disorder.This new research focused on the hippocampus, a hub of memory and emotional response.The researchers found that the stressed mice had trouble with spatial memory that resolved within 28 days. They found that the mice displayed social avoidance, which measures depressive-like behavior, that continued after four weeks of monitoring.And they were able to measure deficits in the development of new neurons 10 days and 28 days after the prolonged stress ended.When they gave the mice a chemical that inhibited inflammation, neither the brain-cell problem nor the depressive symptoms went away. But the memory loss and inflammatory macrophages did disappear.And that led them to conclude that the post-stress memory trouble is directly linked to inflammation – and the immune system – rather than to other damage to the brain. That type of information can pave the way for immune-based treatments, Godbout said.“Stress releases immune cells from the bone marrow and those cells can traffic to brain areas associated with neuronal activation in response to stress,” Sheridan said. “They’re being called to the brain, to the center of memory.”center_img Pinterest Sustained stress erodes memory, and the immune system plays a key role in the cognitive impairment, according to a new study from researchers at The Ohio State University.The work in mice could one day lead to treatment for repeated, long-term mental assault such as that sustained by bullying victims, soldiers and those who report to beastly bosses, the researchers say.“This is chronic stress. It’s not just the stress of giving a talk or meeting someone new,” said lead researcher Jonathan Godbout, associate professor of neuroscience at Ohio State. LinkedInlast_img read more

Continue reading

Why do people with Alzheimer’s stop recognizing their loved ones?

first_imgShare Share on Twitter Email Pinterest For the study, the Montreal team recruited people with Alzheimer’s along with healthy seniors to study their ability to perceive faces and cars in photos that were either upright or upside down. Dr. Joubert explains the team’s findings: “The results for people with Alzheimer’s were similar to those in the control group in terms of answer accuracy and the time to process the upside-down faces and cars. To perform these tasks, the brain must perform a local analysis of the various image components perceived by the eye. However, with the upright faces, people with Alzheimer’s were much slower and made more mistakes than the healthy individuals. This leads us to believe that holistic face recognition in particular becomes impaired. Subjects with Alzheimer’s disease also demonstrated normal recognition of the upright cars, a task that in theory does not require holistic processing. This suggests that Alzheimer’s leads to visual perception problems specifically with faces.” What’s also surprising about this impairment is that it is observed in the early stages of the disease.Overall, Dr. Joubert’s study better explains the mechanism involved in the problem that people with Alzheimer’s have with recognizing the faces of family members or celebrities. The fact that impaired facial recognition might stem from a holistic perception problem–and not just a general memory problem–opens the door to different strategies (such as the recognition of particular facial traits or voice recognition) to help patients recognize their loved ones for longer.center_img Alzheimer’s not only steals people’s memories but also their ability to recognize faces, which widens the gulf between people with this disease and their loved ones. A recent study has demonstrated that, beyond causing memory problems, Alzheimer’s disease also impairs visual face perception. This finding may help families better understand their loved one’s inevitable difficulties and lead to new avenues to postpone this painful aspect of the disease.Research in this area by the team of Dr. Sven Joubert, PhD, a researcher at the Centre de recherche de l’Institut universitaire de gériatrie de Montréal and a professor with the Department of Psychology at Université de Montréal, will be published tomorrow in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease.Face perception plays a fundamental role in human communication, which is why humans have evolved into experts at quickly detecting and identifying faces. This faculty is thought to depend on the ability to perceive a face as a whole. Also known as “holistic perception,” this ability is in contrast to the local and detailed analysis required to perceive individual facial features, such as the eyes, nose or mouth. Dr. Joubert’s study has demonstrated that the holistic ability to perceive faces is impaired by Alzheimer’s disease. Share on Facebook LinkedInlast_img read more

Continue reading

Study: Psychedelic drug psilocybin helps depressed patients ‘re-connect’ to the world

first_imgShare on Twitter Share on Facebook Share “Although many of us think of psychedelics as dangerous drugs, it’s time for a rethink,” explained the study’s corresponding author, Rosalind Watts of Imperial College London. “When used carefully in clinical research settings, psychedelics have been reported to have a profoundly beneficial effect on many people’s lives. They are non-toxic, non- addictive, have very few side effects, and could potentially offer relief for people suffering from a range of psychological difficulties.”In the current qualitative study, which was published in the Journal of Humanistic Psychology, researchers interviewed patients from a clinical trial of psilocybin for treatment-resistant depression. (The initial results of the clinical trial were published in The Lancet.)“Working in a community mental health team, I realised that conventional mental health treatments (antidepressants, CBT) were not working for many people. I also watched my best friend struggle with depression for many years,” Watts told PsyPost.“When she told me she was going to do an ayahuasca ceremony in Peru, I knew nothing about psychedelic therapy research, and thought it was a terrible idea. But she came back home with a sparkle in her eye that I hadn’t seen for years, and told me that the depression had finally lifted. So I thought to myself ‘this looks promising, let’s find out more.’”A number of themes emerged after the researchers questioned 6 women and 13 men who had undergone psychedelic therapy 6 months prior.First, the participants described depression as a state of disconnection, which was reversed with psilocybin. Secondly, the psychedelic treatment helped them confront, process, and accept painful memories and thoughts. Thirdly, they described previous depression treatments as reinforcing the disconnection and avoidance they felt — while psilocybin worked in the opposite way.“The reset switch had been pressed so everything could run properly, thoughts could run more freely, all these networks could work again. It unlocked certain parts which were restricted before,” one participant explained.“I got a wider perspective, I stepped back. It helped me appreciate that the world is a big place that there’s a lot more going on than just the minor things that were going on in my head,” another participant told the researchers.A third remarked: “My previous treatments, talking therapy and meds, were next to useless, utterly useless. My experience of psilocybin has been very positive. I believe there is an unknown physiological and neurochemical change in me, I am absolutely convinced of that.”Or as another participante summed it up: “Now there’s a greater sense of ‘we’re all in the same boat’; less unease.”There were no serious adverse events reported during the psilocybin sessions. But a few participants had troubling psychological experiences which resolved themselves before the session was over. A few participants also wished they had received more psychotherapy following the drug session.“The psychedelic experience is not to be taken lightly,” Watts explained. “Participants in our study found psilocybin therapy to be preferable to other treatments they had tried, but that does not mean it was easy. Many of them had experiences of deep grief, sadness and fear, and relied upon the support of their ‘guides’ to enable them to fully accept and process these emotions. If any psychologists are interested in volunteering as a ‘guide’ they can get in touch at [email protected]”“It’s very early days: the sample sizes are small, and we need to determine the role of placebo effects. Randomized control trials in the United States (John Hopkins, NYU) have started to address the question about placebo effects with similar promising findings. Upcoming randomized control trials in Europe will continue to investigate.”The study, “Patients’ Accounts of Increased “Connectedness” and “Acceptance” After Psilocybin for Treatment-Resistant Depression“, was also co-authored by Camilla Day, Jacob Krzanowski, David Nutt and Robin Carhart-Harris.Listen to Rosalind Watts discuss psilocybin treatment below: LinkedIncenter_img Email Pinterest New research sheds light on how psilocybin could help people overcome depressive symptoms. The psychedelic drug appears to promote a change from disconnection to connection and a change from avoidance to acceptance.Psilocybin is the primary mind-altering substance in psychedelic “magic” mushrooms. The drug can profoundly alter the way a person experiences the world by producing changes in mood, sensory perception, time perception, and sense of self.Scientists have recently starting re-examining at whether psilocybin can be used in the treatment of mental illnesses — and the initial results are promising.last_img read more

Continue reading

Study finds adults who skip or delay breakfast are more likely to have a mood disorder

first_imgPinterest Share on Facebook Email Share on Twitter LinkedIncenter_img Delaying or skipping breakfast is associated with a higher likelihood of mood disorder among adults, according to a new study published in the journal Psychological Medicine.“Mood disorders such as depression can have a big impact on individuals, their friends and family, and broader society. It is important to consider different factors that could contribute to mental disorders, to identify ways to prevent or treat ill health,” said study author Johanna Wilson, a PhD candidate at the University of Tasmania.“Research has shown that a healthy diet is linked to a lower risk of depression. We were interested to know if when people ate during the day was linked to a higher or lower risk of having depression.” Share The researchers analysed data from the Australian Childhood Determinants of Adult Health (CDAH) study, which started in 1985 when the participants were between 7 and 15 years old.As part of the longitudinal study, more than 1,000 participants reported at what times they had eaten the previous day when they were 26-36 years old, and again five years later when they were 31-41 years old. The participants also completed an assessment of mood disorders, such as depression, dysthymia, and bipolar disorder.The researchers found that those who indicated that they had skipped or delayed breakfast were more likely to experience a mood disorder compared to those with a more conventional eating schedule of breakfast, lunch and dinner.“Our study highlights that when you eat may be important for your health, not just what and how much you eat. We found that people who tended to skip or delay breakfast and consume a larger proportion of their daily food intake later in the day were more likely to have a mood disorder,” Wilson told PsyPost.“This may be due to hormonal and circadian effects of eating at a certain time, but it could also be due to whether someone is a morning or evening type person, known as chronotype.”The findings are in line with a previous study, which found that breakfast skippers were at greater risk of depression than those who ate breakfast.Of course, just because someone skips breakfast doesn’t mean they’re necessarily going to develop a mood disorder. “As with many epidemiological studies, the results are more generalisable to a population rather than to individuals,” Wilson said.It is also unclear if skipping breakfast increases the risk of mood disorders or if mood disorders increase the likelihood of skipping breakfast. “These relationships may be bidirectional, and a pre-existing preference for certain eating patterns due to chronobiological traits of the individual should be considered,” the researchers explained.“There is a limit on the number of things we can measure and these unmeasured factors could explain the associations that we observed. Future studies that identify things like chronotype traits could be useful in determining the influence of time-of-day eating on mood disorders,” Wilson added.The study, “An eating pattern characterised by skipped or delayed breakfast is associated with mood disorders among an Australian adult cohort“, was authored by J. E. Wilson, L. Blizzard, S. L. Gall, C. G. Magnussen, W. H. Oddy, T. Dwyer, K. Sanderson, A. J. Venn and K. J. Smith.last_img read more

Continue reading