Chiefs-Rams game moved from Mexico City to LA due to field

first_imgTags :apChiefsnflramsshare on Facebookshare on Twitteradd a commentA Twisted Christmas CarolVeterans Day, My DaughterYou Might Also LikeFeaturedNewsBobadilla rejects Santa Monica City Manager positionMatthew Hall9 hours agoNewsCouncil picks new City ManagerBrennon Dixson20 hours agoFeaturedNewsProtesting parents and Snapchat remain in disagreement over child protection policiesClara Harter20 hours agoFeaturedNewsDowntown grocery to become mixed use developmenteditor20 hours agoNewsBruised but unbowed, meme stock investors are back for moreAssociated Press20 hours agoNewsWedding boom is on in the US as vendors scramble to keep upAssociated Press20 hours ago HomeFeaturedChiefs-Rams game moved from Mexico City to LA due to field Nov. 14, 2018 at 5:00 amFeaturedNewsChiefs-Rams game moved from Mexico City to LA due to fieldAssociated Press3 years agoapChiefsnflrams GREG BEACHAMAP Sports WriterThe NFL moved the Rams’ Monday night showdown with the Kansas City Chiefs from Mexico City to Los Angeles on Tuesday due to the poor condition of the field at Azteca Stadium.The league announced the extraordinary decision six days before one of the most-anticipated regular-season games of the year.In a news release, the league said it determined that the recently re-sodded field at Mexico City’s historic stadium “does not meet NFL standards for playability and consistency, and will not meet those standards by next Monday.”The Rams (9-1) will host the Chiefs (9-1) at the Coliseum instead.The decision creates a morass of logistical concerns for the teams and for fans traveling to Mexico, and it disappoints thousands of fans eager to see a marquee matchup. But the league consulted with the players’ association and local officials before deciding it couldn’t risk the players’ health on a damaged field.“The combination of a difficult rainy season and a heavy multi-event calendar of events at the stadium have resulted in significant damage to the field that presents unnecessary risks to player safety and makes it unsuitable to host an NFL game,” said Mark Waller, the NFL’s executive vice president of international. “As a result, we have determined that moving the game is the right decision, and one that we needed to announce now in order to allow our teams and fans to make alternate arrangements.”Azteca officials changed the playing surface from natural grass to a hybrid in May, but the turf hasn’t been ideal for several months. Concern about the field grew in recent days when aerial photos of the stadium showed serious damage to the grass, particularly on the end of the stadium recently used for a major concert.Cruz Azul, the Liga MX soccer club that shares the stadium with Club America, played a tournament game on the field last Saturday in noticeably poor conditions. Coach Pedro Caixinha expressed concern, and the NFL continued working with groundskeepers to improve the field.Azteca hosted the first regular-season game ever held outside the U.S. in 2005 when Arizona beat San Francisco. The stadium has hosted several NFL exhibitions, and the Oakland Raiders, Houston Texans and New England Patriots all played regular-season games there over the past two seasons.___More AP NFL: www.apnews.com/NFL and www.twitter.com/AP_NFLlast_img read more

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Study highlights impact of childhood vaccines on antibiotic use

first_imgA new study suggests that among the strategies to combat global antibiotic resistance, childhood vaccines may provide the most bang for the buck.The study, published yesterday in Nature, found that pneumococcal conjugate vaccines and rotavirus vaccines prevent more than 37 million childhood illnesses that would otherwise be treated with antibiotics in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), and that scaling up vaccination programs in these countries would more than double that number.The authors of the study say that while it’s been widely thought that vaccines could reduce the burden of antibiotic resistance by reducing the infections that drive antibiotic use, especially in low-income settings, this study provides clear evidence of a significant impact.”The magnitude of the effect that can be achieved with this intervention is just staggering when it’s put together and considered in a global context,” said Joseph Lewnard, PhD, lead study author and an assistant professor of epidemiology at the University of California, Berkeley.Vaccines reduce antibiotic-treated illnessesFor the study, Lewnard and colleagues from the University of California, San Francisco, Imperial College London, and the Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics and Policy looked at the two vaccines that target the predominant causes of acute respiratory infection (ARI) and diarrhea in children in LMICs—the pneumococcal conjugate vaccines against 10 and 13 serotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae (PCV10/13) and live attenuated rotavirus vaccines. The two vaccines are part of routine pediatric immunization programs around the world, though coverage rates are lower in LMICs than in wealthier countries.ARI and diarrhea are the primary drivers of antibiotic use in children in these countries, as few diagnostic tools exist to determine whether these illnesses are caused by a bacterial or viral infection, and antibiotics are often among the few tools that healthcare providers have at their disposal. A recent study in eight LMICs found that, between birth and the age of 5, children receive an average of 25 antibiotic prescriptions, with 80% receiving them for respiratory illness and 50% receiving them for diarrhea.While antibiotics are the often the standard treatment for ARIs in all settings because of the likelihood for pneumonia to be bacterial, use of antibiotics for diarrhea should be much more limited, Lewnard said. And antibiotics should not be used at all for rotavirus-attributable diarrhea. Still, there is substantial and concerning empiric use of antibiotics for diarrhea in LMICs.”The scale of the problem and the extent of unnecessary antibiotic use is certainly more pronounced for diarrheal infections than for acute respiratory infections,” he said.Using data on more than 65,000 children obtained from large-scale household surveys conducted in 16 LMICs, in which mothers are asked about the health and the vaccination status of their children, Lewnard and his colleagues conducted a case-control study to compare the impact of vaccination with PCV10/13 and rotavirus vaccines on preventing antibiotic-treated ARI and diarrhea in children under 5. They found that children who received at least three PVC10/13 doses had 8.7% lower odds of antibiotic-treated ARI than unvaccinated children, with the estimated reduction driven mainly by prevention of cases in children aged 24-59 months. For this age group, vaccination was associated with a 19.7% reduction in cases of antibiotic-treated ARI.Similarly, children who received at least two doses of rotavirus vaccine were 8.1% less likely to get antibiotic-treated diarrhea than unvaccinated children, with the largest effect (an 11.4% reduction) seen during the first 2 years of life.By combining this estimate of vaccine effectiveness with estimates of pathogen-attributable antibiotic use in these countries—i.e., the amount of antibiotic-treated illness caused by vaccine-serotype pneumococci and rotavirus—and current vaccination rates in these countries, Lewnard and his colleagues estimated that PCV10/13 currently prevents 23.8 million episodes of antibiotic-treated ARIs in children aged 24 to 59 months in LMICs. They estimated that rotavirus vaccines prevent 13.6 million episodes of antibiotic treated diarrhea among children aged 0 to 23 months.And that could be an underestimate, Lewnard noted, because ARIs are among the more severe pneumococcal infections, and their analysis did not account for milder illnesses—such as ear infections and upper respiratory infections—that can also be caused by pneumococci and are frequently treated with antibiotics in high-income settings.”There’s a likelihood that we’re missing additional treatment that occurs for some less severe conditions caused by pneumococcus,” he said.In addition, the estimates are based on vaccination rates that range from 66.8% for the PCV10/13 vaccines to 77.3% for rotavirus vaccines. If universal coverage were achieved for these vaccines, they estimate, an additional 40 million episodes of antibiotic-treated illness (21.7 million ARI cases and 18.3 million diarrhea cases) would be averted.Findings support prioritizing vaccines   Lewnard and his colleagues say that while national action plans to address excessive antibiotic use and resistance in LMICs have focused on improving sanitation and hygiene and promoting antibiotic stewardship interventions, the evidence for the effectiveness of these strategies to date is weak or scarce.For example, a recent analysis of three randomized trials evaluating the impact of water, hygiene, and sanitation (WASH) interventions in LMICs found only a modest impact childhood diarrheal disease. And stewardship interventions in low-resource settings, where people frequently purchase antibiotics outside of the healthcare setting, have not been studied much.As a result, they believe the findings of this study indicate that childhood vaccination should be prioritized over these strategies in global efforts to fight antibiotic resistance.”I believe it should be the first strategy to address the problem,” Lewnard said. “I think it’s the most logical starting point.”last_img read more

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The Hydrogen Council welcomes new Co-Chair

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

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Overcome your past hurt to improve future

first_imgI’m 56 years old, have been married for 33 years and have five children, the eldest being 37. My problem is my husband does not support me financially. He has his own business. This has been going on for five years now and he doesn’t want to discuss it. We live in my mother’s house and he didn’t even want to contribute towards the bills. He moved out June 1 and I haven’t spoken to him since. I am emotionally stressed out. I’m very unhappy. I have been trying to make things work. I really need to speak to someone. There is so much going on in my life. Please help.I am really sorry to hear that you have been having such a difficult time in your marriage which you seem to have been committed to for a significant period. It seems with all that you have shared that your husband is a very selfish and uncommitted man. People like this rarely change their ways and if they gain any success in life, they will ensure that only they benefit and nobody else. Now that he has moved out and not spoken to you since, it is a clear indication that he is not interested in your marriage any longer. As sad and difficult as this may be for you to accept, you have to make a decision for yourself to stop waiting for him and to explore your other options, including divorce. It is imperative for you to be able to move on. I understand that doing this at your age will not be easy, but to stay stuck in a situation which is clearly untenable and not working, will just create more emotional turmoil and stress for you in the long run. I would suggest that perhaps you should start exploring your rights in terms of a divorced wife and focus on what you have, for example, your children and the rest of your support system at home. Seek legal advice at a marriage or family court. Once you feel more supported in terms of your legal rights in this matter, I would suggest that you take up some work, even if it is part-time, so that you can start to feel some sense of financial independence again. It is unfortunate that we still live in a very patriarchal society where women’s rights in marriage in particular, are often undermined or not given the status and value they deserve. Now you have to do this for yourself. Set yourself free and start to let go of the hope that you can make him change or “trying to work things out”, he clearly is not interested and will only mess you around again as soon as he has a chance. Move on with your life as challenging as it may be. You deserve better. Do this for yourself and for your children, they are still looking to you as their role model irrespective of their age.I read your article on relationships and reading it made me realise that I am in need of help (“Focusing on yourself can save your relationship”, July 27). People have told me that I am difficult, selfish and controlling. Your column made me feel like I was reading about myself and it was shocking. I always thought of myself as a confident person who loved herself too much and thought she was more special than anyone else. How could I not. I grew up without a father and my mom was there but I didn’t have that much of a relationship with her. I was raised by my grandparents and consider them my parents. When I was eight, my mother got married and soon started her own family. I was just left behind to fend for myself. When I was in Grade 11 she came to fetch me because her husband forced her too, since he thought I needed a better education. That is how I moved from Mpumalanga to Cape Town. In all that I treated her with respect and loved her, yet I don’t remember her showing me love and affection. I met the love of my life and we have the most beautiful five-year-old son and they are the most important people in my life but I’ve treated this amazing man like crap and I don’t know how to fix it. I am scared our son will grow up without a father because of all the problems I am causing. I love him so much but I am a mess and I don’t know how to fix myself or communicate or show my love. You seem to be an intelligent woman who has risen from very difficult circumstances and overcame them, outwardly. That you are willing to admit your ways of treating people in a manner that causes you to hurt them, is already a significant step in the right direction. You did not have positive role models for relationships and your parents failed to be consistently available and loving towards you. That you built up psychological defences to protect yourself is completely understandable. You were hurt, rejected, abandoned and felt mostly unloved. We all respond to these experiences by self-preservation to prevent further hurt. These defence mechanisms may include building an over-valued sense of self, a false self, which makes one seemingly function at an optimal level in the world and ensures control in what seems to be, a very unpredictable environment. However, as we grow and become adults, these defences, on an unconscious level, continue to play out in our relationships. They do not only wall us in and protect us from further hurt but also repeat what parents did and reject, abuse or hurt those whom we have chosen to love, but who, to the hurt person, may seem to be potentially able to cause the woundedness experienced as a child. The psychological term for this is called transference. We transfer, the good and the bad, but usually more the bad, that we experienced in the past onto significant others and treat them as if they were our parents, projecting our anger, hatred or fear onto this new person in our lives, mostly unconsciously. Working through your past will take time but with willingness to heal it can move your growth on exponentially and unburden you from the shackles of the past. I would suggest you contact and start processing your inner experiences with a trained psychotherapist or clinical psychologist in your area, which is easy to “Google”. Also, read relevant books on these issues such as the ones by Harville Hendrix called Getting the love you want and Keeping the love you find. * This column appears every two weeks. Carin-Lee Masters is a clinical psychologist in private practice. While she cannot enter into correspondence with individual readers, she will try to answer as many queries as possible through this column or refer you to organisations that can assist. You can write to her at [email protected] or send a WhatsApp message or SMS to 082 264 7774. Provide sufficient information about your difficulty.last_img read more

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Ross Barkley raises Chelsea threat level to ease burden on Eden Hazard

first_imgShare on Twitter Topics Read more Share on LinkedIn Ross Barkley attributes improved form for Chelsea to Maurizio Sarri What the 92% figure clearly suggests is that Barkley has become more judicious in his pass selection. That is a significant leap from a career average of 85.2%, one that can only partly be explained by the possession-based nature of Sarri‑ball. The suggestion is that there is a maturity about him now and he no longer feels the need to play the killer pass at every touch.The other metric in which there has been a significant improvement is in distance run. Even to the naked eye, Barkley looks sleeker than in the past, and the stats show he is running on average 1.5km per 90 minutes further than in his Everton days.Sarri has been working individually with Barkley to improve his tactical understanding and clearly feels progress has been made. “He has improved the defensive phase,” the manager said after last Sunday’s 4-0 win at Burnley. “Now I think Ross is complete.”A capacity to fit the system is essential, of course, but it is the goals he brings and his capacity to ease the burden on Hazard that make Barkley vital to Chelsea. Eden Hazard Share via Email Play Video Share on Pinterest Share on Facebook Without goals from the centre‑forward or midfield, there is only so far any side can go. Perhaps Hazard can reach the 40-goal target Sarri has set for him but it would be much easier if he were not the only threat opponents have to deal with. That’s why Barkley is so valuable.He has never been exactly prolific over his career – just 28 league goals to date – but Jorginho, Mateo Kovacic and Kanté have only 38 over their careers between them. That Barkley has scored in each of his last three games for Chelsea is not a coincidence. But nor is it a coincidence that Sarri has not started Barkley against either Liverpool or United.He presumably sees Kovacic as the safer option, although at the moment that may simply be an issue of familiarity. Certainly there is little to support a view that Barkley is somehow unreliable or untrustworthy in possession: his pass success rate is lower than Kovacic’s but is still 92%, the second highest at the club and the fifth highest in the league. Factor in the detail that Barkley has three assists to Kovacic’s one and, although there is a small sample size and the nature and condition of the opposition has to be taken into account, there is an argument Barkley’s passes hurt the opposition more. Conte had lost his temper with him during the semi-final second leg over the length of time it had taken Barkley to prepare himself to come on after Willian had picked up a first-half injury, an incident that threatened to become emblematic of the Englishman’s career: a player with all the talent, all the equipment, but somehow just not quite ready to take his chance.Yet this season, the immense potential of Barkley is perhaps finally beginning to be transformed into something more substantive. He has played just 391 minutes, so it is still very early days – and Everton fans will rightly point out that they saw plenty of flickerings – but already he has three goals and three assists. And it is this that is likely to make him key to Chelsea mounting a sustained title challenge.Amid their unbeaten start to the season, one concern stood out for Sarri’s side. It was apparent in the early stages of the 2-2 draw against Manchester United two weeks ago. Twice with the score at 0-0, Hazard worked positions on the left side of the box. The first time he cut the ball back for Kanté, who stabbed the ball unconvincingly goalwards, seemingly attempting an impossible one-two amid a crowd. Wonderful defensive midfielder that he is, Kanté lacks goalscoring instinct: he has only 11 league goals in a seven-year career.Then Hazard, after a clever dart, squared across goal, only to find that neither Álvaro Morata nor any midfielder had anticipated the pass, despite the fact that after Hazard had made the run there was realistically only one place he could deliver a dangerous ball. The lineup with which Sarri started the season offered control but a lack of goals from the centre. There was no equivalent of Marek Hamsik bursting forward from midfield and no centre-forward in form (although whether even an in-form Olivier Giroud bothers with goals these days is debatable). features Chelsea Chelsea’s Maurizio Sarri on unbeaten record: ‘I was lucky’ – video Ross Barkley Share on Messenger Sportblog Share on WhatsApp 1:00 Michael Duberry on football after tragedy: ‘I tried to focus but you couldn’t ignore it’ There is perhaps no group of players so used to adapting themselves to the ways of a new manager as those at Chelsea, where the only consistent philosophy of the Roman Abramovich years has been one of perpetual revolution, but even by their turbulent standards this season has been one that has brought significant change. Everything is different under Maurizio Sarri. Eden Hazard is trusted to be the left-sided floating No 10 he has always wanted to be. César Azpilicueta has gone from centre-back to right-back. N’Golo Kanté thrusts forward from midfield rather than shielding the defence. And Ross Barkley gets on the pitch.The turnaround in the 24-year‑old’s fortunes has been dramatic. Last season he was a spare part, an unwanted signing, the jumper given to Antonio Conte by an aunt, which he feels he cannot get rid of but gets out only when it is really cold and everything else is in the wash. “It’s not simple,” Conte said scathingly in January after a 2-1 Carabao Cup exit at Arsenal, “especially when on the bench the only substitute is Ross Barkley.” Read more Reuse this contentlast_img read more

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