Labour MP Tristram Hunt quits to take up new role as director of Victoria & Albert Museum

Labour MP Tristram Hunt quits to take up new role as director of Victoria & Albert Museum Labour MP Tristram Hunt is to step down and leave the world of politics, as he prepares to take on the role of director of London’s Victoria & Albert Museum.The Stoke-On-Trent Central MP has been in talks with the museum for some time, according to PoliticsHome, which first broke the story. An announcement is expected later today. Friday 13 January 2017 9:54 am Share Hunt, a former shadow education secretary, was once thought a likely candidate to lead the Labour party, but he ruled himself out of the leadership race held in the immediate aftermath of the 2015 General Election, instead backing Liz Kendall for the role.He has been a vocal opponent of Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership and has refused to serve on his front bench.Hunt’s departure means another by-election – in the last vote, Hunt took the seat with a 5,100 majority over Ukip, who were ahead of the Tories by just 33 votes. Caitlin Morrison whatsapp whatsapp More From Our Partners Russell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgI blew off Adam Sandler 22 years ago — and it’s my biggest regretnypost.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgBiden received funds from top Russia lobbyist before Nord Stream 2 giveawaynypost.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.org read more

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UK beer sales rise for the first time in 10 years

first_img Ad Unmute by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeMaternity WeekA Letter From The Devil Written By A Possessed Nun In 1676 Has Been TranslatedMaternity WeekUndoMoneyPailShe Was A Star, Now She Works In ScottsdaleMoneyPailUndoElite HeraldExperts Discover Girl Born From Two Different SpeciesElite HeraldUndozenherald.comMeghan Markle Changed This Major Detail On Archies Birth Certificatezenherald.comUndoBeverly Hills MDPlastic Surgeon Explains: “Doing This Every Morning Can Snap Back Sagging Skin” (No Creams Needed)Beverly Hills MDUndoEquity MirrorThey Drained Niagara Falls — They Weren’t Prepared For This Sickening DiscoveryEquity MirrorUndoUltimate Pet Nutrition Nutra Thrive SupplementIf Your Dog Eats Grass (Do This Every Day)Ultimate Pet Nutrition Nutra Thrive SupplementUndoNoteableyKirstie Alley Is So Skinny Now And Looks Like A BarbieNoteableyUndoBeach RaiderMom Belly Keeps Growing, Doctor Sees Scan And Calls CopsBeach RaiderUndo UK beer sales rise for the first time in 10 years Friday 30 January 2015 10:50 am Share Jessica Morris Show Comments ▼center_img whatsapp More From Our Partners Brave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.org980-foot skyscraper sways in China, prompting panic and evacuationsnypost.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgFeds seized 18 devices from Rudy Giuliani and his employees in April raidnypost.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgInside Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis’ not-so-average farmhouse estatenypost.comA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.com A decade-long decline for beer sales in the UK has finally come to an end, with boozy Brits taking advantage of tax cuts bought in over the last two years.The British Beer and Pub Association’s (BBPA) ‘Beer Barometer’ showed beer sales jumped 1.3 per cent last year. And chancellor George Osborne – who announced a second one pence cut to beer duty as part of his 2014 budget – is largely to thank for this. Beer sales in pubs also began to stabilise, and last year’s 0.8 per cent decrease was the smallest in 19 years. Seven in every ten pub drinks sold is beer making them extremely reliant on the so-called “nectar.”Off-licenses and supermarkets continued to prove popular – as people “pre-loaded”, boozed at home or simply drank with their dinners – and a 3.5 per cent spike meant off-trade sales overtook on-trade sales for the first time ever.  whatsapp Tags: NULLlast_img read more

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City Moves for 28 August 2015 | Who’s switching jobs

first_img whatsapp Tags: NULL whatsapp City Moves for 28 August 2015 | Who’s switching jobs Express KCS Thursday 27 August 2015 8:41 pmcenter_img Pen UnderwritingJonathan Turner has been appointed executive chairman at the UK underwriting business within the Arthur J Gallagher group. He was most recently at Brit Insurance, where his roles included active underwriter of its Syndicate 2987. Turner has also held roles at QBE International Insurance.Deutsche BankKinner Lakhani has been appointed co-head of pan-European banks research at the bank. He was most recently co-head of Citigroup’s European banks research team. Lakhani has also previously held roles at ABN Amro and Morgan Stanley.Broadgate Estates The property management company has promoted Ross McQuillan to portfolio director. He has worked for Broadgate Estates since 2010 and was previously estates services director at the firm. McQuillan also previously worked for Canary Wharf Group for seven years.The Pension Protection FundTrevor Welsh has been appointed head of liability driven investment at The Pension Protection Fund. He joins from Aviva Investors, where he most recently ran the liability driven investment strategy for the Aviva Staff Pension Scheme as head of UK sovereign and rates liability driven investment.SignalThe London-based market intelligence and information discovery platform has appointed Adam Hutchinson as head of product design. He joins from Morgan Stanley, where he was senior interaction designer. Hutchinson has also previously worked at the BBC, leading the user experience team and building BBC iPlayer. He also led the redesign of BBC News.Workplace SolutionsMaxine McIntyre has been appointed head of wealth management at the division of deVere Group, the financial advisory firm. She joins from Close Brothers Asset Management, where she was head of proposition within its corporate division.Essential LivingGavriel Merkado has been appointed analyst in the finance team of the developer and manager of homes for rent. He joins from H4A, where he was a corporate analyst for three and a half years. Merkado has also held positions at Quintain Estates & Development, BMCM, and Jubilee Financial Products.To appear in City Moves please email your career updates and pictures to [email protected] up to receive the new City Moves morning update if you haven’t already. Show Comments ▼ Sharelast_img read more

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‘Massive inequities’ exist among countries for essential medicines

first_img Privacy Policy Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. Please enter a valid email address. Newsletters Sign up for Pharmalot Your daily update on the drug industry. Related: “As a whole, the world spends eight times more on medicines” than the cost of the basket of essential medicines for all of the people in low- and middle-income countries, illustrating the inequity among nations, said Andy Gray, a senior lecturer at the University of KwaZulu-Natal in Durban, South Africa, who was one of 21 international health policy experts assembled by The Lancet to study the problem. Two months ago, the United Nations released a lengthy report urging governments to take various steps to ensure greater access to needed medicines. However, the list contained several proposals that have previously caused struggles with the pharmaceutical industry, underscoring the challenges in reaching a consensus for implementing recommendations.The 84-page Lancet report contains a slew of fixes — systems for routine monitoring of affordability, price, and access; implementing existing policies under World Trade Organization rules for compulsory licensing; greater use of product assessments to gauge benefits and value; delinking R&D costs from pricing; and increased transparency from the pharmaceutical industry. The report arrives at a time of increasing concern over the inequities on pharmaceutical spending, but also rising anxiety across the globe over the cost of medicines. As the commission noted, the US is also experiencing the same problem thanks to price tags for new medicines for combating such hard-to-treat diseases as hepatitis C and various forms of cancer, but also older, generic drugs.advertisement India makes it easier to buy its generic drug makers, but will anyone bite? Antibiotics are among the drugs considered essential in a new study Joe Raedle/Getty Images About the Author Reprints Tags drug pricesessential medicinesThe Lancet Ed Silverman For the first time, spending by countries on essential medicines has been quantified and the results show that a wide gulf exists between the poorest and richest nations. And the findings underscore an “urgent need” for added financing to meet basic health needs, according to a new report, which also recommends several steps to close the global spending gap on treatments.The analysis by The Lancet Commission on Essential Medicines found that the cost of providing a basket of 201 essential medicines to all people in low- and middle-income countries could be as little as $1 to $2 per person per month, or $13 to $25 per person annually. Yet one in five countries worldwide spend less on each person each year, underlying “massive inequities.”In 2010, for instance, the mean spending in 32 low-income countries on medicines per person was $8.80; nearly $37 was spent in 48 lower middle-income countries; about $106 was spent in 53 upper-middle-income countries and almost $459 was spent in 49 high-income countries. Significantly, individuals and families paid the most in low, low-middle-income and upper-middle-income countries.advertisement Leave this field empty if you’re human: What else? The commission recommended pooled procurement; improving the quality of medicines, which are often lower quality in poorer countries with regulatory systems; and avoiding the overuse or abuse of certain medicines, such an antibiotics and opioids. The commission also believes the international community should create an essential medicines patent pool to license patents to other companies in order to create a competitive generics market in low-income countries.Many of these are familiar and have appeared in recommendations from the World Health Organization, but the commission also proposes two dozen indicators for measuring progress. Some examples include household expenditure on pharmaceuticals as a percentage of total household expenditures; median availability of a basket of essential medicines in the public and private sectors and the number of licensing agreements for essential drugs concluded through patent pooling.“Many of the countries don’t have updated reports, for instance, on the out-of-pocket cost for pharmaceuticals as a percentage of total pharmaceutical spending, and that’s a key indicator of affordability when you look at universal health coverage,” said Veronika Wirtz, an associate professor of global health at the Boston University School of Public Health and also a commission member.Ultimately, improved access and affordability will require effort from a variety of players, including patient advocates, regulators, national health institutions and industry. But Hans Hogerzeil, a professor global health at the University of Groningen in The Netherlands, maintained that international agencies and governments should take the lead in setting priorities for R&D and using patent laws.“It’s a failure to rely on public markets to fund development of needed medicines,” he said. “…it’s simply not fair that everybody has money for medicines, except for about 20 percent of the countries in the world.” Pharmalot‘Massive inequities’ exist among countries for essential medicines By Ed Silverman Nov. 7, 2016 Reprints @Pharmalot [email protected] last_img read more

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‘I don’t know how you people sleep at night’: Visibly irate lawmakers blast pharma, PBMs over insulin prices

first_img GET STARTED Log In | Learn More [email protected] By Nicholas Florko April 10, 2019 Reprints ‘I don’t know how you people sleep at night’: Visibly irate lawmakers blast pharma, PBMs over insulin prices Rep. Jan Schakowsky (D-Ill.), right, walks with Rep. Anna Eshoo (D-Calif.) J. Scott Applewhite/AP @NicholasFlorko Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED WASHINGTON — Drug makers and their middlemen counterparts spent the first three months of the 116th Congress successfully dodging hard blows from members of Congress over the high cost of prescription drugs. That all changed Wednesday.Insulin makers and drug industry middlemen faced hours of hard questions Wednesday from an irate panel of lawmakers, many of whom appeared far more interested in threatening to blow up the entire drug pricing system than in hearing from the pharma company or pharmacy benefit manager executives who testified.center_img Washington Correspondent Nicholas Florko reports on the the intersection of politics and health policy. He is the author the newsletter “D.C. Diagnosis.” What is it? About the Author Reprints What’s included? Nicholas Florko STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Politics Tags Congressdrug pricingpolicylast_img read more

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Pharmalittle: Merck says early data shows pill is effective against Covid-19; WHO’s COVAX program ships first doses

first_img [email protected] Pharmalittle: Merck says early data shows pill is effective against Covid-19; WHO’s COVAX program ships first doses Pharmalot Log In | Learn More @Pharmalot About the Author Reprints What’s included? By Ed Silverman March 8, 2021 Reprints STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Alex Hogan/STATcenter_img Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Good morning, everyone, and welcome to another working week. We hope the weekend respite was somehow relaxing and invigorating, because that oh-so-predictable routine of Zoom meetings, Skype calls and deadlines has returned. After all, the world keeps spinning. With that in mind, why not brew a cup of stimulation and give it a push? Our choice today is the ever-delicious maple bourbon. A fine way to start the day. Meanwhile, here are some tidbits to help you along. Hope your day is productive and do stay safe — wear a mask …Merck (MRK) reported that an experimental Covid-19 drug, which promises to be a kind of Tamiflu for the pandemic, had positive results in a preliminary study, The Wall Street Journal says. The pill, which is being developed by Ridgeback Therapeutics, significantly reduced infectious virus in subjects in a mid-stage study after five days of treatment. If further study proves it capable of treating people with Covid-19 who show symptoms, the drug would bolster a limited arsenal of treatments and be the first oral antiviral against the disease. What is it? Unlock this article — plus daily coverage and analysis of the pharma industry — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED Ed Silverman Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. GET STARTED Tags HIV/AIDSpharmaceuticalspharmalittleSTAT+last_img read more

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Laois GAA Fixture Review Committee proposes changing hurling championships to old format

first_img Twitter Council By Alan Hartnett – 21st November 2018 New Arles road opens but disquiet over who was invited to official opening Twitter Pinterest WhatsApp Facebook Laois secondary school announces scholarship winners for new academic year WhatsApp Charlie Flanagan on Electric Picnic: ‘I’d ask organisers to consult with community leaders’ Previous articleCalls for safety measures near GAA Club to be carried outNext articlePortlaoise v the Dublin champions: Some great battles but a long tale of woe for The Town Alan HartnettStradbally native Alan Hartnett is a graduate of Knockbeg College who has worked in the local and national media since 2008. Alan has a BA in Economics, Politics and Law and an MA in Journalism from DCU. His happiest moment was when Jody Dillon scored THAT goal in the Laois senior football final in 2016. Community RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Pinterest Home Sport GAA Laois GAA Fixture Review Committee proposes changing hurling championships to old format SportGAAHurling Laois GAA Fixture Review Committee proposes changing hurling championships to old format Less than a year after Laois GAA introduced a new format for the Senior and Senior A hurling championships – the Fixture Review Committee is calling for it to be reversed.Back in January, clubs voted on a joint proposal from Clough-Ballacolla and Rathdowney-Errill which saw the introduction of a group stage in both Senior and Senior A.Teams were split into two groups of four with the top team qualifying straight for the semi final while the second and third placed teams headed for the quarter finals.That meant that the bottom team in each of the groups headed for the relegation final.It ensured that all teams had a minimum of four championship matches but the Fixture Review Committee have cited concerns about how competitive these games are.In the Senior, champions Camross lost their first game but were able to recover to go on and win the championship.While in the Senior A, Portlaoise lost to Rosenallis and Clonaslee but a win over Trumera got them through to the quarter final where they ultimately went on to win the competition and have since reached the Leinster final.And now the Fixture Review Committee is recommending that the championships revert to the 2017 format.That means a return to have no groups but a back-door system that allows Round 1 losers a second chance to come back into the championship.However, it would reduce the minimum number of games per team from 4 to 3.They say: “The committee would ask that Laois CCC examine the continued championship structure at Senior and Senior A level in hurling.“They would recommend that a return to the 2017 championship format be given consideration, in order to provide a more balanced and competitive championship.”The group are not proposing any change to the current senior football championship.SEE ALSO – Laois GAA Fixture Review Committee proposes radical changes for ‘Gaels teams’ Facebook TAGSLaois SAHCLaois Senior hurling championship Community last_img read more

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A.M. Best reconfirms SSQ credit ratings

first_imgIE Staff Quebec City-based SSQ, Life Insurance Company Inc. has received a reconfirmation of its A.M. Best credit ratings. The credit rating agency published the results of its analysis, and for a third consecutive year, has assigned a financial strength rating of “A- (Excellent)” to SSQ. The company also received a credit issuer rating of “-a”. The outlook for both ratings is stable. Manulife, Sun Life report modest impact from Hong Kong turmoil Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Related news Keywords Life insurance industryCompanies SSQ Financial Group center_img “We are very proud of the ratings we received from A.M. Best after completing its thorough analysis. To repeat this performance, year after year, merely demonstrates our company’s stability and its rigorous management. These results support the actions implemented in accordance with the current strategic plan to ensure our growth and sustainability,” said René Hamel, SSQ Financial Group’s CEO. SSQ’s leading position in Quebec’s group insurance market, consistent and solid earnings, as well as adequate levels of capitalization are the factors that contributed to obtaining these credit ratings once again this year. The credit rating agency also recognizes the efforts in market development outside of Quebec, both in individual insurance and group insurance. SSQ maintains an adequate risk-adjusted capital position, presents high credit quality in its fixed income investment portfolio and continued increases in its capital and surplus levels. A.M. Best also indicated that efforts to diversify business and growth outside of Quebec will be the key factors for SSQ Financial Group to maintain its good performance for years to come. Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Sun Life Financial buying Pinnacle Care International Manulife Canada CEO sees Apple and Netflix as competitors as insurance evolveslast_img read more

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Fear is chief risk from virus outbreak: Scotia

first_img Stagflation is U.S. economists’ biggest fear, SIFMA says Economy lost 68,000 jobs in May If the current coronavirus outbreak represents the second coming of SARS, the economic impact should be modest and transitory, according to a new report from Scotia Economics. For now, rising fear is the biggest threat.Fears of a possible coronavirus pandemic are rising and making investors jittery amid heightened uncertainty, the report stated. And the fact that the virus has now been confirmed in Canada recalls the SARS epidemic of 2003. “Arguably the biggest (economic) lesson from that experience is that fear is the biggest risk to the outlook,” Scotia stated.The direct impact of SARS was tough to pin down, it noted, given the prevalence of other events, such as the U.S. invasion of Iraq and a slowing U.S. economy, that were in play at the time.The Bank of Canada estimated the impact of SARS as a 0.1% hit on GDP, Scotia noted.“While it is premature to predict the path of today’s coronavirus outbreak, we estimate that a SARS-equivalent pandemic today could have a similar impact on the Canadian economy with an estimated hit of just over 0.1% on the level of GDP by mid-2020, at which point a pandemic should be contained,” the Scotia report stated.Under this scenario, China’s GDP would take a 1% hit, likely denting global commodity prices. For example, oil prices could be 4%–5% lower in the first half of 2020.“Assuming peak severity in the first half of 2020, the main impact on Canada would likely be indirect, from lower commodity prices and a drop-off in travel-related industries,” the Scotia report stated.Yet, the estimated impact faces significant uncertainty, the report acknowledged, with risks likely to the downside.“The contagion of fear should not be underestimated at this juncture,” it said.“The onus will be on governments to convey a sense of control and pre-emptively deploy policy levers where possible, otherwise they risk a potentially magnified (and outsized) impact that extends well-beyond what can be predicted by economic drivers alone,” Scotia concluded. Keywords Pandemics,  Economic forecastsCompanies Scotia Economics doctor with phonendoscope slasny/123RF Related news Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Facebook LinkedIn Twitter James Langton A deadly first wave, followed by a tsunami of excess deathslast_img read more

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Action plan to increase socio-economic diversity in Civil Service

first_imgAction plan to increase socio-economic diversity in Civil Service Nearly three out of four senior civil servants are from privileged backgrounds with those from disadvantaged backgrounds sometimes struggling to gain promotion, new research from the Social Mobility Commission shows today.A comprehensive analysis of over 300,000 civil servants shows just 18% of the Senior Civil Service (SCS) come from disadvantaged backgrounds, and 72% from privileged backgrounds. One in four of those in the current 6,000-strong Senior Civil Service went to independent school.The research drawn from both the Civil Service People Survey 2019 and over 100 in-depth interviews with current staff provides a valuable insight into who gets on in Whitehall and how, highlighting obstacles to career progression on the way.Based on these results the Commission has drawn up a detailed action plan for the Civil Service to ensure that those from disadvantaged backgrounds have an easier route to the top.“Civil servants from disadvantaged backgrounds are significantly under-represented in the organisation and even if they do ‘get in’ they can struggle to ‘get on’,” said Steven Cooper, interim Co-Chair of the Social Mobility Commission. “I have been impressed by the level of transparency shown by the Civil Service in embarking on this joint project and sharing their previously unpublished data with us. The focus now should be on considering and swiftly implementing the action plan.”Officials that get promoted from junior grades are more likely to have policy rather than operational posts, work in departments near the political centre of power like the Treasury and live in London. Only 12% of those working at the Treasury are from a low socio-economic background compared to 45% at the Department for Work and Pensions. Similarly, only 22% of civil servants in London are from working class backgrounds compared to 48% in the north-east.The SMC report ‘Navigating the labyrinth’ by Sam Friedman, incoming Professor of Sociology at the London School of Economics, describes in detail “the behavioural code” to ensure promotion in the Civil Service. It suggests that those who do progress exhibit “a studied neutrality”. This is defined as having the right accent or “received pronunciation”, an emotionally detached and understated way of presenting oneself and an “intellectual approach” to culture and politics.Those from disadvantaged backgrounds can be intimidated and alienated by this behavioural code, though many realise that the only way to get on is to adopt it. The complex journey to the top is described by interviewees as a “velvet drainpipe”.“An important part of progressing through the labyrinth of the Civil Service is mastering the unwritten rules; what jobs to take, where to work, how to negotiate opportunities, and above all how to behave,” said Dr Friedman. “And strikingly it is those from privileged backgrounds who hold the upper hand in unpicking these hidden rules.”The Commission’s comprehensive action plan to improve career progression in the Civil Service which it hopes will be adopted by employers throughout the country includes:reporting of socio-economic data within all departments – by location, gender, ethnicity, disability and LGBTusing national benchmarks to assess progress with the aim of ensuring a representative Civil Servicegreater scrutiny of the SCS and five-year targets to increase representation from those from low socio-economic backgroundsOther recommendations include introducing laws to ensure that socio-economic background is a protected characteristic and permanently adopting virtual working of Parliament to enable MPs and ministers, with Civil Service hubs, to be based outside London.The Commission notes recent positive progress in some of these areas, including government’s plans to move more roles out of London, more senior civil servants and greater non-operational roles, such as policy making, outside of the capital.Other key findings:London has the least socio-economically diverse workforce compared to other regions, but the most opportunity for progressionThe London-based workforce is significantly less socio-economically diverse than the rest of the country – 66% are from high socio-economic backgrounds (SEB) compared to 41% in the north-east, and only 22% in London are from working class backgrounds compared to 48% in the north-eastThe three most socio-economically exclusive work regions are in the south of England, and two of the three most socio-economically diverse areas in the north of EnglandThere are far more top-grade posts located in London than elsewhere. While 20% of civil servants work in London, the capital is home to 66% of all SCS. In contrast, 12% of civil servants are based in the north-west but it houses only 3% of SCSSCS has remained exclusiveThe composition of the SCS is roughly unchanged since 1967, the last time this data was collected. Then, 19% were from low socio-economic backgrounds and 67% from privileged backgrounds – although this finding should be read with caution, as it partly reflects the contraction of working-class jobs since the 1960s. See page 19-20Some departments are more exclusive than othersHM Treasury and the (formerly named) Department of Culture, Media and Sport are the most socio-economically exclusive departments (12% and 13% of staff were from low SEBs respectively.) Department for Work and Pensions and HM Revenue and Customs are the most inclusive departments (45% and 42% of staff were from low SEBs respectively)26% of HM Treasury staff and 22% of the (formerly named) Foreign & Commonwealth Office staff (rising to 48% among FCO SCS) were privately educated, compared to just 5% in HMRC and 4% in the DWPCivil servants from advantaged backgrounds often downplay their socio-economic privilege1 in 4 civil servants who self-assess as coming from low SEBs actually had advantaged upbringings. The proportion of those misaligning increases at higher grades (29% at SCS versus 23% and 24% at executive officer and administrative assistant/officer levels)Female civil servants from working class backgrounds are more likely than men from the same socio-economic bracket to believe their background will hamper their progression.There is little difference in the overall socio-economic composition of male and female civil servants, but low SEB women are more under-represented at senior grades. For instance, women in the SCS are more likely than men to be from high SEBs (73% compared to 71%)Ethnic minorities in low socio-economic backgrounds face barriers getting into the civil serviceExcept for those of Asian origin, civil servants from ethnic minorities are more likely to be from advantaged socio-economic backgrounds. For example, 27% of Black African/African Caribbean AA/AOs are from low SEBs compared to 61% from high SEBs /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Africa, Asia, Asian, Caribbean, Commission, commonwealth, Customs, disadvantaged, Government, lgbt, London, mobility, parliament, Professor, research, UK, UK Government, workforcelast_img read more

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