Jackie Henderson and Sara Dowhey Top Emerging Rider Standings

first_img SIGN UP Email* Subscribe to the Horse Sport newsletter and get an exclusive bonus digital edition! Jackie Henderson of Denfield, ON, emerged as the Eastern Division winner while Sara Dowhey of Winnipeg, MB, topped the standings in the Western Division of the 2012 Jump Canada Emerging Rider Series.In the $2,500 Eastern Division Emerging Rider competition held at the Summer Classic in Palgrave, ON, Jackie Henderson guided Sandman, Stanley Henderson’s 11-year-old Württemberg gelding, to a seventh place finish for five points. The duo also finished fourth at the Orangeville International, in Orangeville, ON, for an additional six points. They secured their Eastern Division title with a win, for seven points, in the Emerging Rider Class at the Angelstone National Phase 3, held in Rockwood, ON, finishing the season with a total of 18 points.“I really appreciate the support of Jump Canada through the Emerging Rider Series,” said Jackie Henderson. “Winning the Emerging Rider Award for the Eastern Division was a great accomplishment for Sandman and I. This award will assist me in continuing to show at this level as I complete my degree at the Ontario Veterinary College in 2013.”Paige Mawson of Toronto, ON was the runner-up in the Eastern Division riding Under Pressure, a seven-year-old Hanoverian gelding for a total of 15 points.In the Western Division, Sara Dowhey piloted her own 12-year-old Württemberg gelding Lancia di Roma to a third place finish in the Emerging Rider class at the Royal Manitoba Winter Fair in Brandon, MB, for a total of seven points to win the series.“I am very happy to be awarded the 2012 Western Division Jump Canada Emerging Rider,” said Dowhey, who is a JustWorld International Ambassador. “I had a goal set in mind after doing well in the class offered at the Royal Manitoba Winter Fair, and thanks to my wonderful and supportive mom, Ursula Dowhey, amazing coaches, Herman Schweizer, Rodney Tulloch, Dustin Cassaboom and Shauna Cook as well as the greatest Horse I could ever ask for, Lancia di Roma, traveling across Western Canada was possible, and I achieved my goal to win the series.”“We have purchased a three-year-old this summer, and while in University, I am bringing him up to competition level. My next goal is compete in the Jump Canada Talent Squad Series,” added Dowhey.Kelsee Downie of Sherwood Park, AB was the runner-up in the Western Division riding Bellemiso Cavallo, her 15-year-old Hanoverian gelding.For complete Jump Canada Emerging Rider Series standings, visit www.equinecanada.ca/jumpcanada Tags: Jump Canada Emerging Rider Series, Jackie Henderson, Sara Dowhey, Sandman, Paige Mawson, Under Pressure, Lancia di Roma, Kelsee Downie, Bellemiso Cavallo, Horse Sport Enews More from Horse Sport:Christilot Boylen Retires From Team SportAfter an exemplary career as one of Canada’s top Dressage riders, seven-time Olympian Christilot Boylen has announced her retirement from team competition.2020 Royal Agricultural Winter Fair CancelledFor only the second time in its history, The Royal Agricultural Winter Fair has been cancelled but plans are being made for some virtual competitions.Royal Agricultural Winter Fair Statement on 2020 EventAs the Province of Ontario starts to reopen, The Royal’s Board and staff will adhere to all recommendations put forward by government and health officials.Government Financial Assistance for Ontario FarmersOntario Equestrian has recently released this update of several financial assistance packages available, including those for farm business. We’ll send you our regular newsletter and include you in our monthly giveaways. PLUS, you’ll receive our exclusive Rider Fitness digital edition with 15 exercises for more effective riding.last_img read more

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Dressage Canada Performance Advantage Symposium

first_img Subscribe to the Horse Sport newsletter and get an exclusive bonus digital edition! SIGN UP Dressage Canada presents the inaugural Performance Advantage Symposium in Canada. The first of the two symposiums will be held in the East in Stouffville, ON June 14-15, and will travel to the West in Calgary, AB to be held June 24-25.Today’s top athletes use a full spectrum of tools available to develop their performance including mental, physical, complimentary and supplementary. By providing their professional insight for beginners, avid amateurs and rising stars, the Performance Advantage Symposium presenters will include some of Canada’s best talent in the fields of high performance competition, judging, mental training and conditioning, sport science, sport physiotherapy, performance analysis, horse welfare and veterinary care, and supplement support for the high performance athlete. Each presenter will share their advice and guidance on how to use and develop tools for performance development on and off the field.“The Florida Fortnight held in Wellington in January 2014 was an outstanding success and many of the attendees expressed the wish for Dressage Canada to set up the same type of symposium in Canada. So, we are excited to bring Florida to you, with many of the same presenters that were so popular with our top riders,” commented Dressage Canada’s, Desi Dillingham.Symposium Presenters:Christilot Boylen, six-time Olympian and three-time gold medalist of the Pan American Games.Alexandre Lamarsalle, co-founder of Equisens Osteopathy Clinic providing osteopath care for both horse and rider. (Ontario only)Dr. Karen Nyrop, veterinarian with special interests in English performance horse care, lameness, pre-purchase exams and exercise physiology. (Alberta only)Sandra Sokoloski, a physiotherapist with a focus on analyzing movement patterns, correct posture, body awareness and performance enhancement techniques.Dirk Stroda, a professional self-development and mental performance coach for Olympians, World Champions, amateurs and professionals.Cara Whitham, the only official with FEI 5* judging credentials for Dressage and Eventing.Omega Alpha Pharmaceuticals Inc., manufacture of supplements including over 100 natural health products.Top dressage athletes, Karen Pavicic and Belinda Trussell, have worked with Dirk Stroda as their mental performance coach. Both of them explained how powerful Stroda is and how they have used his advice for their own performance development.“I have had the privilege of knowing Dirk Stroda for over seven years. After utilizing his coaching techniques for mental training, I immediately had improvement in my performance. I had previously had assistance from a number of sports psychologists however, once I had “Power of Coherence” I had the tools to remain in the “zone” in any situation. Dirk’s approach is unlike anything else I have experienced and is highly effective, not only for high performance athletes, but for anyone who wants to manage stress in their lives”, commented Pavicic.“I had the opportunity to work with Dirk during the Florida Fortnight. He is an incredible person who is compassionate, caring and has so many tools in his tool box to help athletes achieve their personal best. During our sessions he gave me wonderful exercises and thoughts which I use daily in life and in competition. I am grateful he is in my life and I will continue to use Dirk throughout my career,” said Trussell.The symposium will provide useful insight for riders of all levels, coaches, parents, friends and colleagues. Attend both days to gain the most out of what the presenters offer and develop your full spectrum of tools to help you on and off the field.Click here to register for the symposium.Click here for each event schedule and detailed information of presenters.* Please note if you are attending the Calgary, AB symposium being held in conjunction with the CDI3*, Gold Level event, advance stabling is available. Requests for stabling should be submitted to the stabling manager, Erin James at [email protected] Tags: Dressage Canada, Omega Alpha Pharmaceuticals Inc., Christilot Boylen, Cara Whitham, Performance Advantage Symposium, Alexandre Lamarsalle, Dr. Karen Nyrop, Sandra Sokoloski, Dirk Stroda, Email* More from Horse Sport:Christilot Boylen Retires From Team SportAfter an exemplary career as one of Canada’s top Dressage riders, seven-time Olympian Christilot Boylen has announced her retirement from team competition.2020 Royal Agricultural Winter Fair CancelledFor only the second time in its history, The Royal Agricultural Winter Fair has been cancelled but plans are being made for some virtual competitions.Royal Agricultural Winter Fair Statement on 2020 EventAs the Province of Ontario starts to reopen, The Royal’s Board and staff will adhere to all recommendations put forward by government and health officials.Government Financial Assistance for Ontario FarmersOntario Equestrian has recently released this update of several financial assistance packages available, including those for farm business. We’ll send you our regular newsletter and include you in our monthly giveaways. PLUS, you’ll receive our exclusive Rider Fitness digital edition with 15 exercises for more effective riding. Horse Sport Enewslast_img read more

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Investment in COVID-19 response by Biden’s son-in-law could raise questions

first_imgJoshua Roberts/Getty ImagesBy LUCIEN BRUGGEMAN, ABC News(NEW YORK) — When the boutique tech firm Yosi Health developed software aimed at streamlining the nation’s coronavirus vaccine effort, CEO Hari Prasad sought help from one of its earliest investors — a company with a special government connection.The investor was StartUp Health, and that special connection came through its chief medical officer, Howard Krein, who is married to President Joe Biden’s daughter.That detail that was not lost on Yosi’s Prasad, who reached out to StartUp Health in December with a request to introduce their platform to government health officials.“Our goal with StartUp Health is to leverage their relationships and work with state and federal agencies,” he explained in an interview with ABC News.During the 2020 presidential campaign, attention on the Biden family focused largely on his son, Hunter Biden. But experts say it is the president’s son-in-law who could present fresh ethical challenges for the new administration.“Howard Krein is playing with fire,” said Meredith McGehee, the executive director of Issue One, a nonpartisan ethics watchdog group. “If he gets too close to that flame — if he is trying to either cash in on his relationship with the president, or he is trying to influence policy — the flame is going to get him. And it is not worth it to him or to Biden.”A renowned Philadelphia-based head and neck surgeon who married Biden’s daughter Ashley in 2012, Krein helps oversee StartUp Health investments in hundreds of companies, including some hoping to break through with the federal agencies battling the global coronavirus pandemic.Since 2011, when Krein founded the firm with his brother Steven Krein and veteran tech entrepreneur Unity Stoakes, Joe Biden has been an active supporter of the venture — headlining corporate conferences and inviting the company’s executives to the Oval Office to meet then-President Barack Obama.When the COVID-19 crisis emerged during Biden’s bid for the White House, Krein stepped up in the spring to advise his father-in-law’s campaign in an unofficial role on potential pandemic response plans — an arrangement that garnered scrutiny at the time, given StartUp Health’s push to invest in firms that were looking to tailor products to help the pandemic response.Now, with Biden in office, Krein’s involvement with StartUp Health has prompted more tough questions, ethicists and tech industry experts told ABC News. Among them: Should Krein advise companies backed by StartUp Health in their efforts to win lucrative government contracts? Should he weigh in with his father-in-law on policy decisions that may benefit those companies? And will he obtain sensitive government information that may help inform investment decisions?“Dr. Krein presents an ethical dilemma because he’s being placed in a position where people want him to deliver access and information that will provide them with a competitive advantage,” said Scott Amey, general counsel at the nonpartisan Project on Government Oversight, which investigates possible conflicts of interest and allegations of waste or fraud in federal government.“At the same time, Biden has to ensure that family and friends’ private matters don’t merge with official government actions,” Amey said. “This situation will take a good amount of transparency and oversight to ensure that lines are not crossed and that ethics standards are upheld.”Neither StartUp Health nor Krein responded to multiple inquiries from ABC News.Michael Gwin, a White House spokesperson, insisted that “Biden has set and maintained the highest ethical standards for himself, his administration, and those around him.”“Any implication to the contrary is flatly untrue and unsupported by the facts,” Gwin said.Since taking office, Biden has reaffirmed his campaign pledge to maintain a wall between his family’s business enterprises and his work leading the federal government.“We’re going to run this like the Obama-Biden administration,” he told People Magazine last week. “No one in our family and extended family is going to be involved in any government undertaking or foreign policy.”Called to the Oval OfficeStartUp Health has invested nearly $2 billion over the past decade, which it has poured into more than 350 startups focused on addressing a long list of challenges in health care, ranging from nutrition and fitness to opioid addiction.“Health care is a very tough place to run a startup … so as a startup you need all of the help and support you can get,” said Prasad. “That’s where StartUp Health plays a critical role. It’s a support system to lean on.”StartUp Health is one of a number of specialists in this arena, but it has not been shy about touting its unique connection to the corridors of power in Washington. The firm has frequently linked itself to the Biden family in promotional materials, highlighting Krein’s travels with the former vice president to promote cancer research and touting Biden’s participation as a speaker at its annual festival, which he did twice as an independent citizen after leaving the vice presidency.Shortly after the company was started, its founders were invited to an Oval Office meeting with then-President Barack Obama to preview their plans. Howard Krein recounted the details of that visit in a 2015 interview.“I happened to be talking to my father-in-law that day and I mentioned Steve and Unity were down there [in D.C.],” Krein said. “[Biden] knew about StartUp Health and was a big fan of it. He asked for Steve’s number and said, ‘I have to get them up here to talk with Barack.’ The Secret Service came and got Steve and Unity and brought them to the Oval Office.”In the intervening years, as StartUp Health has expanded its footprint in the health care tech sphere, its executives have invoked the White House meeting and their special ties to Biden as evidence of the venture’s prominence. References to Biden are scattered across StartUp Health’s website and publications. The company’s blog even republished an excerpt from Biden’s memoir.Biden’s public praise of both the company and Krein only escalated when he left the vice presidency.“I love him like he’s my own,” Biden said of Krein in 2018.Twice Biden appeared as a featured speaker at events hosted by StartUp Health that were intended to entice venture capitalists to invest in the company, touting his son-in-law’s position as an executive at the firm.“Changing the culture to vastly expand cooperation; that’s what attracts me to Startup Health — not just my incredible admiration for my son-in-law,” Biden said at the 2018 StartUp Health Festival in San Francisco. “[Krein] is one of the finest men I’ve ever known in my life, and when a father-in-law says that you know it means something.”Prior to founding StartUp Health, Krein volunteered with the World Pediatric Project for 15 years, participating in international humanitarian missions to provide reconstructive surgeries for children. He did so while continuing to practice medicine in Philadelphia.One pandemic, two rolesIn the spring of 2020, Krein appeared on StartUp Health NOW, the firm’s podcast, to discuss how new technologies may contribute to the pandemic response. During the interview, he promoted a wearable pulse-oximeter developed by an Israeli tech startup called Oxitone as a way of detecting the virus in patients before the onset of symptoms.“It’s really going to revolutionize the way we care for patients,” Krein said of Oxitone, one of StartUp Health’s earliest investments.In an interview with ABC News, Dr. Leon Eisen, the founder and CEO of Oxitone, said StartUp Health has been an invaluable partner in the growth of his company, and counts Krein as “a very good friend.” Eisen agreed it is difficult to ignore the benefit of Krein’s connections, even as he made it a point to say that StartUp Health has always conducted itself with integrity.“[Krein’s] connections could help StartUp Health to make much better business, and, as a result, all StartUp Health companies — independent of their relationship with Howard — will benefit in general from the relationships of StartUp Health and connections of StartUp Health,” Eisen said.Weeks after his March podcast appearance — during which Krein also announced that the pandemic response would become the company’s 12th “moonshot” initiative — Krein’s name surfaced as one of a small group of health experts helping then-candidate Biden shape his own pandemic response platform.A campaign spokesperson told ABC News in October that Krein’s contribution to the campaign was limited to sharing his experience treating COVID-19 patients during the daily conference calls convened by top campaign officials.Potential conflictsIn the hypercompetitive world of venture capital, where information and connections are valuable currency, Krein’s dual roles as a tech entrepreneur and as son-in-law to the president present several novel challenges, experts said.One of those challenges is determining whether Krein will have access to nonpublic information about the Biden administration’s pandemic response plan that may help guide StartUp Health’s investment choices, according to Dr. Johannes Lenhard, a University of Cambridge ethics researcher and author of a forthcoming book on the ethics of venture capital.Given the inherent risk associated with venture capital in determining which startups may someday become profitable, any informational edge would be of tremendous value to investors, Lenhard said.“This whole world is based on insider knowledge, and the information is not equally distributed,” said Lenhard. “A lot of stuff that would be totally outrageous in banking, like this idea of insider trading, is totally commonplace in venture capital. Every deal, in a sense, is based on specific information that an investor might have gotten from their network.”A White House official said that processes involving both the White House Counsel’s office and Biden family representatives are in place to address conflict-of-interest questions, but the official declined to describe those processes in detail.Ann Skeet, an expert in leadership ethics at Santa Clara University, said the ethical considerations surrounding Krein demonstrate the inherent tension now facing the Biden administration as it seeks to regain much of the public’s trust in government after what Skeet called four years of overt nepotism during the Trump administration.“Everyone who holds elected office has an obligation to the constituents they serve, and part of that includes avoiding even the appearance of any kind of impropriety,” Skeet said. “It’s something that people in those roles deal with on a regular basis.”During Trump’s four years in office, his eponymous company continued to pursue real estate deals and his hotels and golf clubs catered to a string of foreign and lobbying clients in what Skeet called a flouting of the barriers that traditionally prevent elected officials from profiting from private business while in office. Skeet said Biden owes it to Americans to hold himself to a new, higher standard of ethical conduct.“[Biden] is in a new territory now,” she said. “We all are. The whole country is.”Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Northwestern Indiana district plans closing 2 high schools

first_img (Public Domain) The head of a northwestern Indiana school district says it must close two high schools to avoid the possibility of a state takeover.A plan approved by the Hammond School Board closes Clark and Gavit high schools following the 2020-2021 school year to save $36 million over five years. About 1,850 students each would attend Morton High School and a new school under construction next to the current Hammond High School.The (Northwest Indiana) Times reports district Superintendent Scott Miller says he doesn’t want a state-picked private company running its schools like in Gary and Muncie after they both faced a financial crisis.Miller says the district’s enrollment has fallen by nearly half to about 12,000 students over the past 50 years while continuing with four high schools. Facebook Twitter Pinterest Google+ Pinterest WhatsApp Previous articleRemember to Thaw Your Bird Before It’s Too LateNext articleMichigan names new Director of elections Associated PressNews from the Associated Press and its network of reporters and publications. Facebook Northwestern Indiana district plans closing 2 high schools By Associated Press – November 25, 2019 0 328 Google+ IndianaLocalNewsSouth Bend Market Twitter WhatsApplast_img read more

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When genetics gets personal

first_imgJust five years after the Human Genome Project announced it had decoded the first human DNA, the era of personal genetics is dawning, bringing with it not just the promise of targeted, personalized medicine and a new level of self-knowledge, but also a host of ethical, legal, and practical issues. A new project out of a Harvard Medical School genetics lab is trying to make sure we’re prepared to deal with the potential benefits and pitfalls arising from these issues.Though just a handful of years have passed since the Human Genome Project’s scientific milestone, technology’s rapid advance has transformed the genetics landscape. While the decoding of the first human genome took 12 years and $3 billion, today companies have opened shop offering personal genome decoding for just a fraction of the cost. Within five years, experts predict, such a service could cost as little as $1,000 and take just days.While knowing one’s genetic makeup could reveal secrets of ancestry, health, and other characteristics, the access to these secrets raises potentially troubling ethical and legal questions, ranging from control of that information, to health insurance coverage, to job discrimination, to issues of privacy within families whose members share the same genetic background.That’s where the Personal Genetics Education Project comes in.The project was founded two years ago by Harvard Medical School Genetics Professor Chao-Ting Wu and Jack Bateman, a former postdoctoral fellow in Wu’s lab and now assistant professor of biology at Bowdoin College. It is headed by Dana Waring, who has developed educational material about personal genetics and who presents that material to schools, colleges, private firms, and even the U.S. Senate office of Democratic Party nominee Barack Obama. Waring advised Obama’s policymakers on ethical issues in their Genomics and Personalized Medicine Act of 2006.“It’s the old story of technology coming first and everyone else catching up,” Waring said. “We’re talking optimistically and hopefully, but there are risks, many of which are not totally clear.”Wherever she speaks, Waring said, people are quick to pick up the implications of the sudden availability of such intimate information.She offered the example of a child who wants to be tested for an inheritable disease even though her parents don’t want to find out. The test comes back positive and it turns out the disease is inherited through the mother. What does the child do? Does she tell her? Does she tell her siblings about her mother or even about herself, since telling people about herself would automatically tell them something about her mother?New knowledge about a genetic susceptibility for ill health also has implications in areas such as health insurance and employment because an employer may not want to hire someone likely to develop an ailment that could increase the employer’s health insurance costs.Waring has developed several lessons and made them available to high school and college teachers on the project’s Web site. The classes, she said, are intended to educate students about the science surrounding personal genetics and to foster discussions about its potential benefits — such as improved diagnosis and treatment, early detection of disease, and more effective medicines — as well as its potential pitfalls.Today’s high school and college students are important audiences, said Wu and Waring, because the personal genetics revolution will be maturing as they do, and as they take the reins of society, they’ll be the ones making the ethical, moral, and legal decisions about the technology’s use.“It’s in their hands to guide this world,” Wu said. “We’re not really telling them what to think, just posing these questions.”Wu said the project has its roots in conversations she’s had over the years with other geneticists, including her husband, Harvard Genetics Professor George Church, who is running the Personal Genome Project, an academic effort to decode the genomes of as many as 100,000 people.Wu and Church traveled to meet volunteers in that project and Wu said there was universal curiosity about the work. But the curiosity and enthusiasm was almost always tempered by reservations and concern about the use of the information to be derived.Though companies already exist that will decode a person’s genome and compare it with known markers for genetic diseases and other things, Wu and Waring expect the costs to drop rapidly and the quality of the scans to increase dramatically in the next few years. Though the Personal Genetics Education Project has been up and running for two years, Wu and Waring said they feel like they’re behind, trying to catch up. They already have more requests for speaking engagements than they can fulfill and are talking about seeking new sources of funding and hiring more staff.“It’s like many other revolutions. [How you handle it depends on] how educated you are and how prepared you are,” Wu said. “It can be fantastic if we’re prepared for it.”Among their plans is outreach to physicians, a substantial number of whom received their M.D.s before the personal genetics revolution hit. Wu said they’d like to put together an easy-to-read booklet with the basics of what’s going on, so doctors understand what’s happening when a patient walks in with a genome scan and asks for advice. As prices come down, Wu said, it may become standard medical practice for patients to get their genome scanned and kept as part of their medical records.“We feel it’s important to engage people before it’s pounding on your doorstep,” Waring said.last_img read more

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NASCAR TV Schedule: Week of Nov. 25-Dec. 1

first_imgWhich channels have NASCAR programming this week? We answer that and give the weekly NASCAR television listings here in the NASCAR TV schedule.Note: All times are ET.MORE: How to find NBCSN | Get the NBC Sports App | How to find FS1 | Get FOX Sports AppTuesday, November 266 p.m., Glory Road: Controversial Finishes (re-air), NBCSN/NBC Sports App6:30 p.m., Glory Road: The Winston Million (re-air), NBCSN/NBC Sports AppOn MRN7 p.m., NASCAR LiveThursday, November 28Noon, NASCAR Race Hub – Best of Features: Part 1, FS1/FOX Sports App1 p.m., Beyond the Wheel (re-air), FS1/FOX Sports App2 p.m., Refuse to Lose: Jeff Gordon and the 1997 Daytona 500 (re-air), FS1/FOX Sports App3 p.m., Untold Stories: Daytona (re-air), FS1/FOX Sports AppSunday, December 19:30 a.m., How It’s Made: NASCAR Engines (re-air), Science Channel9 p.m., NASCAR Xfinity Series Awards, NBCSN/NBC Sports Applast_img read more

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Watch Dopapod Perform “Mucho” For Elementary School Students In Colorado [Video]

first_imgEarlier this month, Dopapod returned to action for a weekend of shows in Denver, CO to kick off the first full leg of tour dates since their comeback performance at The Capitol Theatre back in April.One of the shows as part of their Denver weekend run was that of a special performance at the nearby Maxwell Elementary School, where Dopapod teamed up with music education nonprofit Little Kids Rock to talk to the kids and perform (assembly style) for the school’s 3rd-, 4th-, and 5th-grade students.Related: Dopapod Adds New Dates With Organ Freeman, Cycles To 2020 ‘Emit Time Tour’The elementary school performance that day featured renditions of “Mucho” and “Happy Song”, in addition to an impromptu blues jam with some of the school’s student horn players. Dopapod’s appearance at Maxwell Elementary also featured an appropriate performance of beloved children’s song/surprise recent worldwide viral sensation, “Baby Shark”. That “Baby Shark” performance wound up being teased on several occasions during Dopapod’s VIP performance the following night.Watch a portion of the band’s gig at Maxwell Elementary below.Dopapod – “Mucho” – Maxwell Elementary School[Video: Dopapod]Dopapod’s Emit Time Tour picks up again next month with a show at TLA in Philadelphia, PA on November 23rd with support from DOMi and JD Beck. Head to the band’s website for tickets and tour information.last_img read more

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Canada to Protect Northern Forest and Tundra

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreCanada announced Wednesday it is acting to protect two large swaths of boreal forest and tundra in the Northwest Territories from development — a total of almost 10 million hectares (24M acres) AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

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Saint Mary’s hosts conversation about women’s role in the Catholic Church

first_imgSaint Mary’s Campus Ministry and the Center for Spirituality hosted a dinner and conversation Tuesday evening titled “The Catholic Church Needs Women; Do Women Need the Catholic Church?” featuring Sr. Sharlet Ann Wagner, CSC, the President-elect of the Leadership Conference of Women Religious.The event consisted of small group discussions between three to four students, an adult layperson and a Sister of the Holy Cross over dinner before Wagner delivered remarks about the role of women in the Church.“I wanted to take a few minutes to affirm the statement [that the Catholic Church needs women],” she said. “We know that the Church has always counted on women. We have been the backbone and workhorse of Catholic parishes — we’ve staffed the altar society, we’ve been the sacristans, we’ve taught the religious education classes, we’ve provided the bereavement ministry, taught in the schools and taught the children in the Catholic faith.”However, Wagner went on to say women are more than just the labor by discussing her recent experience at last year’s United States Conference of Catholic Bishops Conference.“More than the labor, I would say the Catholic Church needs the prospective and voices of women,” she said. “Our Church is not whole when half the voices are missing. And we could do and be so much more.”Wagner then addressed the question of whether or not women need the Catholic Church — which she said she personally believes is an “emphatic yes” based off her own reflections.“Growing up, to me ‘church’ meant basically the hierarchy, the bishops, the priests, the institutions [and] the buildings,” Wagner said. “ … Later in life, ‘church’ came to mean, to me, the people of God. I rejected the hierarchical view and said church was the people sitting in the pews. At this point in my life, I’ve settled in the middle and church has become all of the above. … When I say I need the Catholic Church, I mean all of us together in this glorious mess of a church.”That mess is shown in the occasional “flaws” of the Church and its leaders, Wagner said.“My disgust with behaviors and attitudes has led me to genuinely struggle with remaining a member [of the Church], but I have come to realize that the Church is made of people,” she said. “Of you, of me — of people like us. And I know very well that I’m not perfect; I’m deeply flawed. So how I can ask my Church, which is made up of people like me, to be perfect?”Even so, Wagner insisted the Church still has room to improve and should call on her to grow as a person just as she hopes to ask it to continue growing.“I need the Church because its where I connect most deeply with God,” Wagner said. “Yes, I can pray without the Church. I can and do experience God walking this beautiful campus. I don’t have to go into the Church of Loretto to experience God, but I know that we human beings are communitarian by nature. And I experience God in and with my worshipping community.”Her communion was not just with her local worshipping community, she said, but with the Church as a whole, across space and time. In sum, Wagner said women need the Catholic Church because people need the Catholic Church and women are people.“I spent a week in Rome recently, participating in some meetings and Vatican City is such a wonderful mixture, of languages, of cultures and colors,“ Wagner said. ”There are people from all over the world and when I met from Vatican officials they came from all over the world [which reminded me] that I’m part of a vertical community that stretches backward for millennia and stretches forward to future generations.”Tags: Catholic church, Leadership Conference of Women Religious, Saint Mary’s Campus Ministry, Sr. Sharlet Ann Wagnerlast_img read more

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St. Edward’s Hall continues to build on traditions

first_imgEditor’s note: This article is one in a series profiling the dorms of Notre Dame.In 1882, St. Edward’s Hall was originally built by the Brothers of the Holy Cross using clay bricks that were made out of the clay from Saint Mary’s Lake and St. Joseph’s Lake. At the time, the hall served as a dormitory for children at the Notre Dame Grammar School, remaining so until 1928. After a massive fire in 1980, the hall was rebuilt into its current structure. Named after Notre Dame founder Fr. Edward Sorin’s patron saint, St. Edward’s is the oldest building presently used as a dorm.Juniors Cole Edwards and Brendan O’Donnell — who serve as hall president and vice president, respectively — said the size and culture of the dorm provides the foundation for its community. “The dorm is very tight-knit, very small … everybody knows each other,” Edwards said. “[The freshmen] know a lot of the sophomores, they’re starting to get to know the juniors and seniors a little better. I’m trying hard to meet as many as I can, as fast as I can.”The traditions of St. Ed’s are shaped by the history of the dorm. Its spring formal — also known as Yacht Dance — takes place on the last day of classes, when Stedsmen and their dates cruise around Lake Michigan after enjoying dinner in downtown Chicago. According to the dorm’s official website, St. Ed’s began its Mullets Against Malaria event in 2013, in which participants don a mullet in order to raise money for Nothing But Nets, a charitable organization which provides mosquito nets to those living in areas with high risk for malaria transmission. In recent years, the dorm has reported over $8,300 in charitable fundraising due to this event alone.These dorm traditions have continued to change with time. During a past Founder’s Week, which contains week-long dorm programming in the fall semester, former St. Edward’s commissioner Kurt Roemer organized a badminton tournament in which Stedsmen compete against each other for the championship of the “Steds Shuttlecock Showdown.” Alumni heavily contribute to the funding of St. Edward’s Hall’s traditions, with 2018 Notre Dame Day contributions totaling around $13,100, in addition to a challenge pool share of around $35,300. O’Donnell gave credit to Fr. Ralph Haag, the rector of St. Edward’s Hall, for helping to form a welcoming community. “Our rector, Fr. Ralph, is a really good guy,” O’Donnell said. “He looks out for all the kids — he’s a big part of St. Ed’s.” “I don’t know any other dorms that have that kind of relationship, and he has really been the foundation of St. Ed’s for however long he’s been here,” Edwards added. “Without that, everything we do and continue to do and, you know, issues that we work through, he makes sure that everything that makes St. Ed’s what it is stays what it is — and that’s huge for us.”Tags: dorm features, Mullets Against Malaria, Ralph Haag, St. Edward’s, St. Edwards Hall, Yacht Dancelast_img read more

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