Community Wellness Specialist

first_imgYale University, conveniently located betweenBoston and New York, offers exciting opportunities for achievementand growth in New Haven, Connecticut. Located in the heart ofhistoric downtown New Haven with more than 100 local boutiques,national retailers, cafés, casual eateries, award-winningrestaurants, and world-renowned theaters, galleries, andmuseums.General Purpose: Provides non-clinical counseling and on-site wellness support toYale College students and working closely and collaboratively withResidential College Deans. We invite you to discover the excitement, diversity,rewards and excellence of a career at Yale University. One of thecountry’s great workplaces, Yale University offers excitingopportunities for meaningful accomplishment and true growth. Ourbenefits package is among the best anywhere, with a wide variety ofinsurance choices, liberal paid time off, fantastic family andeducational benefits, a variety of retirement benefits, extensiverecreational facilities, and much more.Yale University considers applicants for employment withoutregard to and does not discriminate on the basis of an individual’ssex, race, color, religion, age, disability, status as a veteran,or national or ethnic origin; nor does Yale discriminate on thebasis of sexual orientation or gender identity orexpression. Required Education and Experience: Master’s Degree in Psychology, Social Work, or relatedfield.  Two years’ work experience in a clinical settingcounseling students individually and/or in groups or an equivalentcombination of experience and education. Yale College has more than 6,000 undergraduate students. About22% of students are the first in their family to attend college andabout 20% are Pell-grant eligible. Students are assigned to one of14 residential colleges. Each residential college has a head ofcollege, a member of the faculty, a residential college dean, ahead of college senior administrative assistant, a college deansenior administrative assistant, a service assistant for the headand an operations manager for the college. Residential collegedeans are the chief academic officer of the college and provideadvising and non-clinical counseling to the students in theircollege. PLEASE SUBMIT A COVER LETTER IF YOU WISH TO BE SERIOUSLYCONSIDERED FOR THIS ROLE. Qualifications:Demonstrated ability to counsel undergraduate students.Sensitivity towards intergenerational communication, racial/ethnicidentity processing, and issues of belonging across race, gender,sexuality, socioeconomics, etc.Demonstrated ability to provide sensitive non-clinicalcounseling and follow-up contact with students with serious mentalillness and those in crisis (e.g. after a psychiatrichospitalization), as well as students returning from time away fromYale (leave of absence).Strongly demonstrated counseling, collaboration, andcommunication skills. Ability to develop, conduct and facilitategroup discussions.Demonstrated ability to support students with issues of stress,coping, and conflict-resolution through de-escalation, wellness andresilience strategies.Ability to manage working with multiple reporting lines andprioritize time-sensitive issues. Ability to work a flexibleschedule to provide services when students’ schedules allow.Preferred Education and Experience: Knowledgeof Yale’s Residential College system. Experience with students in ahighly-selective, liberal arts environment. SSCs will refer students to a licensed Yale Mental Health andCounseling staff for psychotherapy and therapeuticinterventions. Application: For more information and immediateconsideration, please apply online at https://bit.ly/YaleCareers-64342BR.  Please be sure to reference this website when applyingfor this position. Reporting to the Dean of Student Affairs and Yale Mental Healthand Counseling, two Student Support Counselors work with individualstudents referred to them by Residential College Deans. SSCsprovide case management and college-wide group wellnessprogramming. Working on a wide range of issues, SSCs also serveYale College students in programming to develop strategies for timeand stress management, resilience and coping, conflict resolution,social and cultural belonging, and wellness and self-care. The twoSSC will support 7 residential colleges and provide services withinthose colleges. As this role is to enhance student access toservices through proximity, the SSCs provide services duringevening and weekend hours.last_img read more

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Photos on mTickets

first_imgAs part of fraud prevention First West of England now requires photo IDs for all new Child, Young Person and Student mTickets.It will reduce the need for separate ID in some cases, although students may also be asked to show college/ university ID if there is any doubt.Customers will be prompted to upload a photo when they buy tickets and will not be able to complete transaction until this has been done.It is also extending the ‘Ticket sharing’ facility to Young Persons and Students to enable parents/others to purchase mTickets.QR codes will also start to appear on mTickets, initially on University student tickets.This is in preparation for the rollout of its new Ticketer machines which will be able to ‘scan’ mTickets.last_img read more

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ND researchers mobilize as Hurricane Florence paves stormy path

first_imgHurricane Florence struck the east coast Friday, ransacking North and South Carolina with record flooding and region-wide catastrophe.The storm was downgraded from a hurricane to a tropical depression, but the damage being left in its wake persists: thousands are trapped by rising floodwaters, hundreds of thousands of homes are without power and the death toll reached 18 Sunday.For a group of professors, that damage is a siren call. Photo Courtesy of Tracy Kijewski-Correa Andrew Kennedy surveys a demolished beach in the Virgin Islands after Hurricane Maria hit in 2017. Kennedy is part of a group of professors that conducts research on natural disasters to evaluate infrastructure and building codes.Andrew Kennedy, a coastal science and engineering professor, is one of a group of faculty members in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences (CEEES) who collect data about natural disasters. Often, this involves deploying to the affected area or partnering with teams already in the region to conduct research.“With our partners in North Carolina, we have put out 10 water level gauges on the North Carolina barrier Islands on Tuesday and Wednesday of last week,” Kennedy said in an email. “[With the gauges], we will have good records of water levels and some wave information near buildings, which is needed for helping designs. However, we will not have this information until we pick up the gauges and download the data.”This isn’t the first time professors deployed to an area struck by natural disaster to gather on-the-ground data. It’s been done for “a bunch of storms” in the past, Kennedy said.“We used to have a program where we would have a helicopter fly along the coast before the storm and lower gauges that we found afterwards using divers,” he said. “But that program ended a while ago, and since then we have only been placing gauges on land to investigate conditions around built-up areas.”As of Sunday, rain accumulation reached 40 inches in southern North Carolina and 20 inches in northern South Carolina and western North Carolina, according to the National Hurricane Center, and is also affecting parts of Virginia and other New England states.Given the severity of the storm, research can’t be conducted until before or after the disaster hits, Kennedy said, which means deployment teams must wait before collecting much of the research.“It is not certain what will happen after Florence clears up,” Kennedy said. “We will likely send a team down in concert with other people and assess the damage and how that related to the conditions during Florence.”The team will likely be led by Tracy Kijewski-Correa, Kennedy said, who is the director of the Structural Extreme Events Reconnaissance (StEER) Network, a National Science Foundation initiative created this year.Kijewski-Correa said StEER is a new network involving a “volunteer corps” composed entirely of members from in or around the community affected by the storm. The team will travel to the afflicted region in a coordinated manner to gather on-the-ground research, she said.“Our job is to get on the ground fast, as fast as safely possible, and use mobile apps to collect as much data as we can using a team that’s in the field as well as a larger team that remains at their universities processing the data that they’re feeding in on off their phones,” Kijewski-Correa said.Using wind simulations, storm surge measurements, aerial data and social media, Kijewski-Correa said the StEER team has been working already to identify key neighborhoods particularly struck by Florence for on-the-ground teams. The aim is to create a “sheet map” of a concentration of damage across the affected area — one that can help other research teams or the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). “I’m literally corresponding with professionals in South Carolina and North Carolina who are locked up in their homes right now,” Kijewski-Correa said. “But we can get on the ground with our mobile app almost instantly once the rain subsides, and they can start feeding data into the second wave that will probably fly in from universities that are further away from the zone.”Virtual assessment teams work on the “backside” of the operation, Kijewski-Correa said, which involves processing the data from on-the-ground researchers and adding additional information to assist in the process.“Most of the information that you need you have to be up-close front to observe,” Kijewski-Correa said. “The reality is you cannot forensically kind of understand what happened unless someone gets close enough, either with a drone, a set of laser scanners or physically with a mobile camera to be able to take those images. You can’t really see them unless you have someone get there.”Notre Dame’s performance during the hurricane season last year warranted a contract distinguishing the University as the “coordinating node” for the network, Kijewski-Correa said. This new role will change the manner by which the storm’s damage is assessed. “If we do a really good job as the leaders, we’re empowering other researchers to get out there and collect the data rather than us having to chase every disaster, which is really hard,” she said. “We deployed people for I think all three hurricanes last year, and that’s a lot of missing class, a lot of physical and emotional burden on those people.”While about three Notre Dame professors regularly deployed for natural disasters, the goal now is to take everything learned over the last 10 years and build it into a system encouraging others closer to the target zone to engage in research, Kijewski-Correa said.“We are virtually leading [others] and orchestrating their movements and staying kind of like what we call a ‘war-room’ above the battlefield so that you can see what all your people on the ground are doing and position them well rather than being so deep in it without cell communication that you can’t really beat,” she said.The data gathered often helps researchers learn what needs to be changed in infrastructure and building designs, Kijewski-Correa said, which can be a decade-long cycle to implement after a major disaster. She said this is known as the “major learning loop,” an element of structural engineering that is essential to keep people safe.“The only way that all of the construction practices and building codes that keep all of your families safe are ever validated is for people to do exactly what we do because we cannot build your house and then subject it to all that nature can do at full-scale,” Kijewski-Correa said. “We can’t simulate the kinds of things that the hurricane does in a lab, you actually have to see what it really does because it’s so complex and so large-scale you have to see that on the ground.”Tags: Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, Florence, Hurricane, Hurricane Florence, stormlast_img read more

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DFR Deputy Commissioner Provost tops Captive Review magazine’s ‘Power 50’ list

first_imgDavid Provost, deputy commissioner of the Vermont Department of Financial Regulation’s Captive Insurance Division, has been named number one on Captive Review magazine’s ‘Power 50’ list.’ The magazine called him the most recognized person in the captive insurance world and praised him for his approachability, captive expertise and leadership. Up from number three in 2012, Provost’s guidance through the process of licensing Vermont’s 1,000th captive this past October ‘further reinforced his position as 2013’s premier captive figure,’ the magazine wrote. ‘ Commissioner Susan L Donegan said she is proud of Provost’s work. ‘ ‘David is a tribute to his profession, an invaluable asset to the department and the captive insurance industry,’ she said, ‘he strives every day to preserve and broaden Vermont’s ‘gold standard’ reputation. ‘ ‘Vermont is renowned for its tradition of quality regulation and David is at the helm. He is well-respected among his peers and his opinion is routinely requested on a global level,’ Donegan said.’ Since becoming deputy commissioner in 2008, Provost has guided 176 captive insurance companies to licensure in the state. He attributes some of his success to his open management style.’ ‘It is important to promote open communications and keep up with the changing needs of the industry,’ he said, ‘and that is accomplished by listening to our companies and paying attention to their needs while regulating them in a way that is appropriate to their limited purposes.‘Companies choose Vermont because they are confident in the service they will receive, our experience and the consistency of governmental support,’ he said.’ Captive insurance is a regulated form of self-insurance created by companies or groups of companies as an alternative to traditional insurance and is designed to better manage their own risk. Vermont’s captive insurance industry employs more than 1,400 people in full- and part-time positions and is the largest captive insurance domicile in the U.S. and the third largest in the world. Since October, two more captive insurance companies have been licensed in Vermont bringing the total to 1,002.DFR 11.17.2013‘ –>‘last_img read more

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Northeast Johnson County morning roundup

first_imgVillage Shops and Corinth launch apps for Apple and Android. The Village Shops and Corinth Square recently launched mobile apps for both Apple and Android platforms. The apps include a map of the shops as well as a full list of merchants. People who download the app can register to win a $50 gift card in weekly drawings. The Village Shops app is here and the Corinth app is here.Politico covers “moderate revolt” in Kansas. Politico reporter Manu Raju filed a report from Wichita on Kansas moderate Republicans’ endorsement this week of Democrat Paul Davis for governor. “The race is shaping up as a contest between a pair of candidates portraying each other as outside the mainstream. Davis says Brownback’s hard-right agenda has damaged the state economy and undermined the spirit of compromise that had long prevailed in the state capitol. Brownback is casting Davis as an Obama supporter who’s too liberal for a reddening state. Moderate Republicans could tip the balance,” writes Raju. [GOP moderates revolt in Kansas — Politco]TV covers Prairie Village “pop-up garden”. KMBC aired a piece Tuesday about the community garden a neighbor planted in the traffic island at 73rd Street and Village Drive. [Pop-up garden adds spice to Prairie Village neighborhood — KMBC]NEJC natives make dean’s list at Washington University. Four northeast Johnson County natives made the spring honor roll at Washington University in St. Louis. The students are: Cira Gloria Danda of Mission Hills; Max Hofmeister of Mission Hills; Erin Elizabeth Sellers of Prairie Village; and John Thomas Walker of Prairie Village. To qualify, the students had to maintain a grade point average of at least 3.6.last_img read more

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Redevelopment projects in Mission have potential to fulfill vision nearly 2 decades in the making, says new mayor Ron Appletoft

first_imgMission Mayor Ron Appletoft says that new developments will dominate the city’s agenda in the coming years.It’s been more than a decade since Ron Appletoft helped craft a vision for Mission’s central business corridor as a member of the city council.Now — after rolling off the council, coming back on in 2015, and then being elected the city’s new mayor in November — he’s in a position to see much of what he and his peers on the governing body envisioned in the 2000s come to fruition.With the new five-story Mission Trails apartment and retail project planned for Johnson Drive near Lamar, and a development agreement in place for the long-stalled Mission Gateway project, the city could see an influx of new residents in its downtown in the coming years. Those projects alone would go a long way toward the concept of a vibrant Johnson Drive where people live, work, shop and dine.“Whenever you have a vision, it’s never a short thing,” Appletoft said last week, a day after he was sworn in to succeed Steve Schowengerdt as mayor. “You have to figure out what you’re going to do, how you’re going to fund it, and make sure people see where you’re trying to get.”Appletoft acknowledges that the path to put the city in the position it’s in today hasn’t always been easy. The renovation of Johnson Drive during Laura McConwell’s tenure as mayor was needed to set the stage for the regreening of the area, but it caused its share of frustrations for business owners and Mission residents. The fits and starts with Tom Valenti’s plans for the Gateway project have tried the patience of citizens, but the proposal approved by the city last fall has the potential to be “the jewel we’re looking for,” says Appletoft.“Nothing happens overnight,” Appletoft said. “I just want to continue our momentum. Any successes we may have in the next few years, those are built on things the city did when Laura was mayor, and when Steve was mayor, and the work the council was doing.”With the Gateway project, in particular, Appletoft said, Mission has the opportunity to create something special that would make it stand out.“If [Valenti] builds what he proposed to us, it will be a spectacular project,” Appletoft said. “And I think it will be a metro, regional draw.”Of course, Valenti still has to make good on his end of the bargain. Appletoft said he hopes the developer will be able to come to the city in the coming months and announce the tenants he’s signed for two buildings reserved for “entertainment” uses in the project. If the project become reality, Mission will soon have two major new developments on either end of Johnson Drive, bringing new residents and shoppers to the area.“When that happens, you’ll see the business are going to do better, the businesses are going to be more valuable, and you have this energy of everything working together,” he said.last_img read more

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Meyer Sound Redefines Tanger Center with USA’s Largest Constellation System

first_imgThe Steven Tanger Center for the Performing Arts in Greensboro, North Carolina is now the home to the largest Meyer Sound Constellation® acoustic system in the United States. The center’s events will be supported by world-class audience amenities and advanced technologies, including variable acoustical environments tailored for each performance. The project was both boldly ambitious and fiscally conservative. It was ambitious in that the $90 million facility would incorporate the latest technologies for acoustical and staging flexibility, allowing the venue to serve as a concert hall for symphony performances and opera as well as an auditorium for spoken word events and a road house for touring shows from rock concerts to Broadway musicals. It was conservative, however, in that the cost was substantially less than what would be needed to build two separate venues.“I knew from the outset that the economics would be driven by selling out touring shows, which is why we set 3,000 as our minimum capacity and designed our staging to accommodate tours well into the future,” states Matt Brown, who as managing director of the Greensboro Coliseum Complex now also carries responsibility for the Tanger Center. “Yet following the demolition of the old War Memorial Auditorium, the Greensboro Symphony was in need of a new home. Our goal was to provide an optimum environment for both types of performances without compromising either.”The challenge was handed to the acoustical consultants for the project, Arup of New York, with acoustical design at various stages guided by Matthew Mahon, Christopher Darland and Ed Arenius. Arup’s recommendation was to design the hall with relatively dry physical acoustics to accommodate spoken word and amplified music with electroacoustic enhancement added as required for most other musical events.“The symphony would have preferred a 1,600-seat symphonic concert hall, but Guilford College’s Bryan Series and Broadway series were selling double that number,” recalls Brown, “so we needed to acoustically accommodate both. That led to a thorough education on electroacoustic technology culminating in the selection of a Constellation system.”Also involved early in the process was Cliff Miller, president of SE Systems, eventually selected as the AV systems integrator. Although brought on board primarily to consult on road house requirements, Miller also helped connect key people in Greensboro to the Meyer Sound team in Berkeley.“To a great extent, the choice of Constellation was driven by a push from Dmitry Sitkovetsky, the music director of the symphony,” recalls Miller. “He visited Meyer Sound in Berkeley to hear Constellation early on when other systems were still under consideration. He also consulted with other conductors familiar with the technology before tilting strongly toward Constellation.”Not only did Sitkovetsky hear Constellation in the audience at Meyer Sound’s Pearson Theatre, he also sat in with a string quartet, playing his Stradivarius violin. In addition, he had previously noted the acoustical improvements at Moscow’s Svetlanov Hall following installation of Constellation there. Also traveling to Berkeley to audition Constellation was Tom Philion, president and CEO of ArtsGreensboro.The Constellation system as installed by SE Systems comprises a total of 205 small full-range loudspeakers mounted laterally and overhead. Eight different models were deployed, both full-range and subwoofers, all incorporating Meyer Sound’s exclusive IntelligentDC for self-powered systems with simplified cabling requirements. For ambient acoustical sensing, 57 miniature condenser microphones are arrayed throughout the hall, feeding signals to the 18-module D‑Mitri® digital audio platform. Five of the modules are D-VRAS processors hosting the patented Virtual Room Acoustic System algorithm. Installation project manager for SE Systems was Sam Trexler.The Tanger Center schedule for 2021 and beyond features the Greensboro Symphony subscription series highlighting concerts with Kenny G and Sting. Also on tap is the inaugural Broadway season with Wicked, The Lion King, Dear Evan Hansen, Mean Girls and Beautiful – The Carole King Musical. Speakers for the Bryan Series include actress Sally Field and former U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May.“The acoustical toolset we have in Constellation as applied in a 3,000-seat setting affords economic advantages that I believe will be a model for all future performing arts venues of this type, not just here in the United States, but around the world,” summarizes Matt Brown.It was a disappointment to the arts community in Greensboro, North Carolina when COVID-19 forced cancellation of grand opening festivities for the new Steven Tanger Center for the Performing Arts only days before the scheduled event. The multi-day celebrations in March 2020 were to include performances by, among others, Josh Groban, Tony Bennett and Jay Leno. A new opening date has not yet been set.last_img read more

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Dade Bar opens a referral service

first_img September 15, 2010 Regular News D ade Bar opens a referral service The Dade County Bar Association will soon launch a Florida Bar-sponsored lawyer referral service to cover Miami-Dade County.The Dade County Bar Association Lawyer Referral Service will take over coverage of Miami-Dade County from The Florida Bar Lawyer Referral Service on Friday, October 1. (The Bar’s LRS covers those areas of the state where the local bar does not operate a lawyer referral service.)Lawyers interested in joining the Dade County Bar Association Lawyer Referral Service should contact: The DCBA Lawyer Referral Service, 123 N.W. First Avenue, Suite 214, Miami 33128-1895, (305) 371-2646 or [email protected] Dade Bar opens a referral servicelast_img read more

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FLU NEWS SCAN: Pandemrix and narcolepsy, H1N1 border screening, H5N1 seroprevalence

first_imgApr 19, 2012Ireland reports Pandemrix links to narcolepsy in kids, teensIrish children and teens receiving the Pandemrix 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) vaccine had a statistically significant 13-times-greater risk of developing narcolepsy than did children not receiving the vaccine, according to a report from the country’s health department today. Investigators found 32 cases reported from April 2009 that met the case definition of narcolepsy, 28 of which were in 5- to 19-year-olds. They established a narcolepsy incidence of 5.8 (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.5-9.0) per 100,000 person-years in vaccinated versus 0.5 (95% CI, 0.2%-1.0%) per 100,000 person-years in unvaccinated patients, which translated into a “highly statistically significant” 13-fold increased risk (95% CI, 4.8-34.7). Dr Darina O’Flanagan, director of the Health Protection Surveillance Centre, said in an Irish Department of Health (DOH) press release today, “International experts agree that a number of factors are likely to have contributed to the increased risk of developing narcolepsy and further research is required to understand the exact causative mechanism.” The European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) added in its own release that the report’s “powerful epidemiological association” is similar to those reported by Finland and Sweden. Last summer European regulators restricted the use of Pandemrix in children and young adults under 20 years old.Apr 19 Irish DOH press releaseApr 19 ECDC news releaseFull DOH reportJul 21, 2011 CIDRAP News story “EMA narcolepsy review restricts Pandemrix use in kids, teensChinese study finds H1N1 border screening ineffectiveBorder entry screening was unlikely to have delayed the spread of pH1N1 flu into China by more than 4 days, researchers reported yesterday in Emerging Infectious Diseases. Chinese and UK scientists analyzed data from multiple surveillance systems and clinical investigations to determine transmission patterns of pH1N1 in China from May through November 2009 and assess whether entry screening and holiday school closures affected transmission. They found that school closures for 8 days of national holidays in October reduced the effective reproduction number by 37% (95% confidence interval, 28%-45%). They also found that border entry screening detected at most 37% of pH1N1 cases in international travelers, with 89% of them identified as having fever at the time of entry into the country. The authors said their data parallel European and US results, and they conclude, “Border entry screening during the influenza pandemic delayed spread in China by a few days, at most.”Apr 18 Emerg Infect Dis study Study finds H5N1 antibodies in 2.6% of Chinese poultry workersA study of blood samples from 306 poultry workers in a Chinese province that has had H5N1 avian flu outbreaks and two human cases found that 8 workers (2.6%) had serologic evidence of H5N1 infection. Reporting yesterday in BMC Infectious Diseases, Chinese investigators said they examined samples from three counties in Jiangsu province and used a hemagglutinin inhibition assay titer of 1:160 as a measure of seropositivity. They found the rate of seropositive samples varied from 0 to 5.4% among the three counties but did not specify individual titers or history of exposure to H5N1 viruses. They also reported that, of the two strains used in testing, no samples were positive for a 2010 H5N1 strain; all positive samples were for a 2005 H1N1 strain. The authors conclude, “Our findings suggest that avian-to-human transmission of influenza H5N1 virus remains low in China.”Apr 18 BMC Infect Dis abstractlast_img read more

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Welcome to the leisure domes

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

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